*

Faroese killing whales and dolphins turned the harbour waters blood red

Situated between Norway and Iceland, the Faroe Islands hunt whales and dolphins each summer as a traditional practice, which is also known as the grindadrap in the local language.

Photo via Sea Shepherd Global

Activist organization Sea Shepherd Global posed as tourists from July to September this year andrecorded the hunts. Such traditional practice was no more than barbaric slaughter and was definitely unnecessary, said the group.

Photos showed the Faroese killing whales and dolphins, which had turned the harbour waters blood red. The animals had deep cuts around their neck areas as they were killed by lances before being dragged onto the shore.

Photo via Sea Shepherd Global

Sea Shepherd Global said 198 Atlantic whitesided dolphins and 436 pilot whales were slaughteredin nine hunts, condemning the frenzy. 

The Faroe Islands' government, however, had no plans to call a halt. The spokesperson said that the activist group aimed to provoke public outrage at the community intentionally. Each whale offers the islanders with several hundred kilograms of meat and blubber, otherwise the country has to resort to imports. 

Photo via Sea Shepherd Global

They also stated that the longterm pilot whale hunt accounted for less than one percent of the total stock. According to official statistics, 295 pilot whales were killed last year and 501 in the year 2015.  

They added that the lance for hunting was designed by a vet and ensured that whales lose consciousness in a few seconds. 

Photo via Sea Shepherd Global