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Observers allowed back into UN climate talks after protest

The United Nations says dozens of observers expelled from its annual climate meeting in Madrid will be allowed back into the venue.

Some 100 people were escorted off site Wednesday after some staged an impromptu demonstration outside a hall where U.N. chief Antonio Guterres was speaking.

The protesters said they were angered by the slow pace of the talks and the apparent unwillingness of major greenhouse gas emitters to do more to curb global warming.

Protesters gather at the COP25 summit in Madrid, Wednesday Dec. 11, 2019. World leaders agreed in Paris four years ago to keep global warming below 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit), ideally no more than 1.5 C (2.7 F) by the end of the century. Scientists say countries will miss both of those goals by a wide margin unless drastic steps are taken to begin cutting greenhouse gas emissions next year. Claiming that the message doesn't seem to be getting through to governments, over one hundred activists led by representatives of indigenous peoples from Latin and North America made their way to the talks' venue, blocking for some tense minutes the entrance to a plenary meeting where U.N. Secretary General António Guterres was about to speak. (AP PhotoBernat Armangue)

The U.N. climate office said Thursday that the protesters violated rules they had agreed to in advance to be accredited for the talks, including a prohibition on holding "unauthorized demonstrations.”

In a joint statement, representatives from the various groups said they would abide by the guidelines and seek permission before staging future protests.

The talks, which are officially due to end on Friday, appear to be heading for overtime amid disagreements over rules for international carbon markets and help for poor countries affected by climate change.

Protesters gather at the COP25 summit in Madrid, Wednesday Dec. 11, 2019. World leaders agreed in Paris four years ago to keep global warming below 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 degrees Fahrenheit), ideally no more than 1.5 C (2.7 F) by the end of the century. Scientists say countries will miss both of those goals by a wide margin unless drastic steps are taken to begin cutting greenhouse gas emissions next year. Claiming that the message doesn't seem to be getting through to governments, over one hundred activists led by representatives of indigenous peoples from Latin and North America made their way to the talks' venue, blocking for some tense minutes the entrance to a plenary meeting where U.N. Secretary General António Guterres was about to speak. (AP PhotoBernat Armangue)

Antonio Guterres, Secretary-General of the United Nations delivers a speech during a Global Climate Plenary event at the COP25 climate talks congress in Madrid, Spain, Wednesday, Dec. 11, 2019. (AP PhotoPaul White)