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California Legislature OKs plan aimed at in-person learning

California lawmakers on Thursday approved a $6.6 billion plan aimed at pressuring school districts to return students to the classroom before the end of the school year.

The bill does not order school districts to resume in-person instruction and it does not say parents must send their kids back to the classroom if they don’t want to.

Instead, the state will dangle $2 billion before cash-strapped school boards, offering them a share of that money only if they offer in-person instruction by the end of the month.

California Gov. Gavin Newsom speaks about the state's plan to reopen schools as coronavirus vaccinations continue during a news conference on the school yard at Barron Park Elementary in Palo Alto, Calif., Tuesday, March 2, 2021. (Karl MondonBay Area News Group via AP)

School districts have until May 15 to decide. Districts that resume in-person learning after that date won’t get any of that money.

“We need to get the schools reopen. I know it’s hard, but today we are providing powerful tools for schools to move into this direction,” said state Sen. Scott Wiener, a Democrat from San Francisco who pleaded with his school district to accept the money and offer in-person instruction.

The bill passed both houses of the state Legislature on Thursday by overwhelming margins. But many lawmakers criticized the bill as too weak.

Students wearing face masks and face shields to protect from covid-19 sit at their desks during class at the Sinaloa Middle School in Novato, Calif. on Tuesday, March 2, 2021. The school just reopened Monday, Feb. 22, 2021 for in-person learning.(AP PhotoHaven Daily)

The bill does not say how much time students should spend in the classroom, prompting fears some districts might have students return for just one day per week and still be eligible to get the money.

Republicans in the state Senate tried to amend the bill to require schools to offer at least three days per week of in-person learning, but Democrats in the majority rejected it.

And while the bill requires most elementary school grades to return to the classroom to get the money, it does not require all middle and high school grades to return this year.

A student works on an art project while surrounded by plexiglass during class at the Sinaloa Middle School in Novato, Calif. on Tuesday, March 2, 2021. The school just reopened Monday, Feb. 22, 2021 for in-person learning. (AP PhotoHaven Daily)

Gov. Gavin Newsom, a Democrat, has said he plans to sign the bill into law on Friday. The bill comes as Newsom faces a potential recall election later this year, fueled by anger over his handling of the fallout from the coronavirus pandemic.

Newsom has trumpeted the back to school proposal as evidence of his commitment to getting students who have studied mostly online since last March into classrooms again.

But Scott Wilk, the Republican leader in the state Senate, said the bill was simply an effort by Democrats to give Newsom political cover so he can “get parents to believe he’s doing everything he possibly can for them.”

Jennifer Becker, right, Science Teacher at the Sinaloa Middle School, talks to one of her students in Novato, Calif. on Tuesday, March 2, 2021. The school just reopened Monday, Feb. 22, 2021 for in-person learning. (AP PhotoHaven Daily)

“The truth is this bill doesn’t do anything to reopen our schools. I believe with or without this bill, school districts that want to reopen will and school districts that don’t want to reopen won’t,” said Wilk, who voted for the bill along with most other Republicans.

A student plays the flute while wearing a protective face mask during a music class at the Sinaloa Middle School in Novato, Calif., Tuesday, March 2, 2021. The school just reopened Monday, Feb. 22, 2021, for in-person learning. (AP PhotoHaven Daily)

Socially distanced and with protective partitions students work on an art project during class at the Sinaloa Middle School in Novato, Calif., on Tuesday, March 2, 2021. The school just reopened Monday, Feb. 22, 2021, for in-person learning. (AP PhotoHaven Daily)