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Slade Cecconi, Diamondbacks earn 5-3 victory over the Giants

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Slade Cecconi,  Diamondbacks earn 5-3 victory over the Giants
Sport

Sport

Slade Cecconi, Diamondbacks earn 5-3 victory over the Giants

2024-04-22 08:36 Last Updated At:09:02

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Right-hander Slade Cecconi held the San Francisco Giants to two runs in six innings in his 2024 debut, and Gabriel Moreno hit a two-run, go-ahead single in the sixth inning to lead the Arizona Diamondbacks to a 5-3 victory Sunday.

Cecconi (1-0) started in place of an injured Merrill Kelly to help the Diamondbacks earn a split of the four-game series. He was recalled from Triple-A Reno to make his fifth career start to replace Kelly, who was scratched with a shoulder injury.

Most Diamondbacks came to the park unaware they would not be playing behind Kelly, the team's No. 2 starter. Cecconi flew in from Reno on Saturday night and was not told he was starting until a few hours before the game. Manager Torey Lovullo said that made Cecconi's performance, and the team's reaction to the injury news, more impressive.

"It was not an easy day," Lovullo said. “You wake up and get the news on Merrill. It takes a toll on the team. And then what Slade did just kind of gave us a chance to catch our breath, and we won a big game.”

The Giants did not have a hit against Cecconi until Thairo Estrada had an infield single with two outs in the fifth. Mike Yastrzemski then homered over the right-field wall to give the Giants a 2-1 lead. It was his first homer of the season.

Moreno hit his go-ahead single in the sixth off left-hander Erik Miller (0-1) to give Arizona a 3-2 lead.

Arizona scored twice in the ninth to extend its lead to 5-2, during which Giants manager Bob Melvin and third base coach Matt Williams were ejected for yelling at plate umpire Stu Scheurwater over a foul-tip call.

Melvin's ejection was his second this season. Replays showed Kevin Newman appeared to swing over Nick Avila's two-strike pitch. Scheurwater ruled the ball hit Newman's bat. The ejections came after Newman, his at-bat extended, hit an RBI double.

“It's an out right there, instead of a hit and a run,” Melvin said. “It looked to me like it was fairly clear.”

Kevin Ginkel allowed Estrada's RBI double with two outs in the ninth, but struck out Yastrzemski for his fourth save of the season.

Giants starter Jordan Hicks allowed one run and one hit in five innings. He kept the Giants in the game despite walking four and hitting two batters. Hicks did not have a strikeout and allowed a run on Jake McCarthy's sacrifice fly in the second inning.

Kelly developed shoulder discomfort throwing between starts. He had an MRI that revealed a mild strain, but he likely will get another MRI in Phoenix.

Kelly began the season 2-0 with a 2.19 ERA in four starts. He pitched effectively during the 2023 postseason, contributing one win each in the National League Division Series against the Dodgers, the NL Championship Series against the Phillies and the World Series against the eventual-champion Rangers.

TRAINER'S ROOM

Diamondbacks shortstop Blaze Alexander left the game in the fifth inning with a hamstring cramp. Alexander said he did not believe it was serious.

UP NEXT

The Giants, behind RHP Keaton Winn (1-3, 4.09 ERA), open a three-game home series against the Mets and RHP Jose Quintana (1-1, 3.05) on Monday.

The Diamondbacks continue their 10-game trip in St. Louis on Monday, with RHP Brandon Pfaadt (1-1, 5.32) facing RHP Lance Lynn (1-0, 2.18).

AP MLB: https://apnews.com/hub/MLB

Arizona Diamondbacks' Gabriel Moreno hits a two-run single against the San Francisco Giants during the sixth inning of a baseball game in San Francisco, Sunday, April 21, 2024. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

Arizona Diamondbacks' Gabriel Moreno hits a two-run single against the San Francisco Giants during the sixth inning of a baseball game in San Francisco, Sunday, April 21, 2024. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

San Francisco Giants' Mike Yastrzemski, right, celebrates after hitting a two-run home run that also scored Thairo Estrada (39) during the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Arizona Diamondbacks in San Francisco, Sunday, April 21, 2024. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

San Francisco Giants' Mike Yastrzemski, right, celebrates after hitting a two-run home run that also scored Thairo Estrada (39) during the fifth inning of a baseball game against the Arizona Diamondbacks in San Francisco, Sunday, April 21, 2024. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

Arizona Diamondbacks pitcher Slade Cecconi works against the San Francisco Giants during the third inning of a baseball game in San Francisco, Sunday, April 21, 2024. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

Arizona Diamondbacks pitcher Slade Cecconi works against the San Francisco Giants during the third inning of a baseball game in San Francisco, Sunday, April 21, 2024. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

Arizona Diamondbacks pitcher Slade Cecconi works against the San Francisco Giants during the first inning of a baseball game in San Francisco, Sunday, April 21, 2024. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

Arizona Diamondbacks pitcher Slade Cecconi works against the San Francisco Giants during the first inning of a baseball game in San Francisco, Sunday, April 21, 2024. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

DENVER (AP) — Colorado Gov. Jared Polis signed two bills into law Friday that overhaul state oversight of the funeral home industry after a series of gruesome discoveries, including 190 discomposing bodies in a facility, families being sent fake ashes and the unauthorized sale of body parts.

The cases put Colorado's lax funeral home regulations — some of the weakest in the nation — in the spotlight and rocked hundreds of already grieving families.

Some families had ceremonially spread ashes that turned out to be fake. Others said they had nightmares about what their loved ones might have looked like in a decayed state.

“When grieving the loss of a loved one, the last thing a family should worry about is the trustworthiness and professionalism of those entrusted to care for the person who has passed," Polis said in a statement.

The new laws bring Colorado in line with most other states.

One requires regulators to routinely inspect funeral homes and give them more enforcement power. Another implements licensing for funeral directors and other workers in the industry. They would need to pass background checks and a national exam while possessing degrees and work experience.

Previously, funeral home directors in Colorado didn't have to graduate from high school, let alone have a degree.

The funeral home industry was generally on board with the changes though some expressed concern that strict requirements for funeral home directors were unnecessary and would make it difficult to find hirable applicants.

The bill signings follow a rocky year for Colorado funeral homes.

In early October, neighbors noticed a putrid smell coming from a building in the town of Penrose about two hours south of Denver. Authorities soon found 190 decaying bodies there including adults, infants and fetuses.

Some were stacked atop each other. Decomposition fluid covered the floors while flies and maggots swarmed.

Almost two dozen bodies dated to 2019 and some 60 more were from 2020. As the bodies were identified, families who had received ashes learned the cremains weren't their loved ones.

In most states, funeral homes are routinely inspected but no such rules were on the books in Colorado. The owners of the funeral home were arrested in November and collectively face hundreds of charges of abusing corpses and other counts.

Just months later, in February, a woman's body was found in the back of hearse where a suburban Denver funeral home had left it for over a year. At least 30 sets of cremated remains were found stashed throughout the funeral director's home.

Bedayn is a corps member for the Associated Press/Report for America Statehouse News Initiative. Report for America is a nonprofit national service program that places journalists in local newsrooms to report on undercovered issues.

Mead Gruver in Cheyenne, Wyoming, contributed to this report.

FILE - Colorado Governor Jared Polis delivers the 2024 State of the State address to a joint session of the legislature in the House of Representatives in the State Capitol, Thursday, Jan. 11, 2024, in Denver. Polis is set to sign two bills Friday, May 24, that overhaul the state's oversight of the funeral home industry after a series of gruesome discoveries, including 190 discomposing bodies in a facility, families being sent fake ashes and the unauthorized sale of body parts.(Hyoung Chang/The Denver Post via AP, File)

FILE - Colorado Governor Jared Polis delivers the 2024 State of the State address to a joint session of the legislature in the House of Representatives in the State Capitol, Thursday, Jan. 11, 2024, in Denver. Polis is set to sign two bills Friday, May 24, that overhaul the state's oversight of the funeral home industry after a series of gruesome discoveries, including 190 discomposing bodies in a facility, families being sent fake ashes and the unauthorized sale of body parts.(Hyoung Chang/The Denver Post via AP, File)

FILE - Fremont County coroner Randy Keller, left, and other authorities unload materials that will be used to put up tents at the Return to Nature Funeral Home where over 100 bodies have been improperly stored, Saturday, Oct. 7, 2023, in Penrose, Colo. Colorado Gov. Jared Polis is set to sign two bills Friday, May 24, 2024, that overhaul the state's oversight of the funeral home industry after a series of gruesome discoveries, including 190 discomposing bodies in a facility, families being sent fake ashes and the unauthorized sale of body parts.(Parker Seibold/The Gazette via AP, File)

FILE - Fremont County coroner Randy Keller, left, and other authorities unload materials that will be used to put up tents at the Return to Nature Funeral Home where over 100 bodies have been improperly stored, Saturday, Oct. 7, 2023, in Penrose, Colo. Colorado Gov. Jared Polis is set to sign two bills Friday, May 24, 2024, that overhaul the state's oversight of the funeral home industry after a series of gruesome discoveries, including 190 discomposing bodies in a facility, families being sent fake ashes and the unauthorized sale of body parts.(Parker Seibold/The Gazette via AP, File)

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