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Royal Queen Seeds Celebrates 4/20 With Billboard Takeover in Times Square

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Royal Queen Seeds Celebrates 4/20 With Billboard Takeover in Times Square
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News

Royal Queen Seeds Celebrates 4/20 With Billboard Takeover in Times Square

2024-04-22 17:57 Last Updated At:18:11

NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Apr 22, 2024--

Royal Queen Seeds (RQS), one of the largest and most trusted cannabis seed banks in the world, celebrated 4/20 with a 20-story advertisement in Times Square, marking New York’s move toward legal and regulated home cultivation of cannabis for all adults.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20240422549501/en/

The 200-foot-tall One Times Square Billboard, which historically counts down to New Years, encouraged New Yorkers to grow their own cannabis and included a countdown to 4:20 p.m., which was celebrated with RQS’ latest U.S. cannabis seed partner, TYSON 2.0 and its Co-founder Mike Tyson.

“Growing cannabis at home is one of the most rewarding experiences, and for New Yorkers looking to cultivate, Royal Queen Seeds is a trusted partner throughout their journey, from seed germination to harvesting,” said Shai Ramsahai, President of RQS. “Cannabis home grow should be legal, especially in the states where you can legally purchase cannabis as an adult for recreation, yet are still prohibited or outright criminalized for growing the same plant on your own private property.”

With a majority of Americans supporting legal cannabis home cultivation and home growers reporting emotional health, safety and economic benefits according to a 2024 Harris Poll survey, it is the perfect time for New York residents to discover the joy of growing cannabis at home.

“Beyond the self-recorded benefits people enjoy from home cultivation, home growers develop a deeper understanding of and relationship with cannabis and mother nature,” Ramsahai continued. “As one of the largest cannabis seed banks in the world, we will continue to advocate for fair and legal home cannabis cultivation laws and regulations for personal use.”

As RQS heralds a new era for cannabis in New York with the Times Square celebration, the company is also riding high with its recent “hat trick” of award recognition, named Best Seed Bank by Spannabis, International Cannabis Industry Awards and the Emjays.

For more information, visit royalqueenseeds.com/us. To download the results of the survey or high-resolution photos and b-roll of the countdown click here.

About Royal Queen Seeds

Established in 2007 in Amsterdam, Royal Queen Seeds (RQS) is the market leader at the forefront of the global cannabis genetics industry, recognized as “Best Seedbank of the Year” at The Emjays International Cannabis Awards 2023 in Las Vegas. Driven by an inherent passion for the plant, RQS meticulously tests each seed for germination, vigor, yield and both recreational and medical efficacy. This dedication, combined with relentless research and development, allows RQS to pioneer and anticipate market trends while delivering top-tier genetics curated by its team of biologists. The company is also a respected cannabis educator that offers comprehensive grow guides, resources and instruction for cultivators. It has developed an extensive range of modern genetics—including autoflowering and proprietary F1 hybrids—that cater to the varied needs of contemporary growers at every skill level, from hobbyists to professionals. Multiple Cannabis Cup victories and “Best Seed Bank” awards—at prestigious global events including The International Cannabis Awards and Spannabis—speak to the company’s outstanding breeding and innovation.

RQS now operates online in the U.S., Thailand and 28 countries across Europe. Headquartered in Barcelona, brick and mortar locations can be found in Amsterdam, Barcelona and Bangkok. Learn more at royalqueenseeds.com.

NEW YORK, NEW YORK - APRIL 20: (L-R) President of Royal Queen Seeds Shai Ramsahai, Mike Tyson and Adam Wilks attend the Royal Queen Seeds takeover of the One Times Square Billboard for 4/20 on April 20, 2024 in New York City. (Photo by Gary Gershoff/Getty Images for Royal Queen Seeds)

NEW YORK, NEW YORK - APRIL 20: (L-R) President of Royal Queen Seeds Shai Ramsahai, Mike Tyson and Adam Wilks attend the Royal Queen Seeds takeover of the One Times Square Billboard for 4/20 on April 20, 2024 in New York City. (Photo by Gary Gershoff/Getty Images for Royal Queen Seeds)

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Documentary filmmaker Morgan Spurlock, who skewered fast food industry, dies at 53

2024-05-24 23:38 Last Updated At:23:40

NEW YORK (AP) — Documentary filmmaker Morgan Spurlock, an Oscar nominee whose most famous works skewered America's food industry and who notably ate only at McDonald’s for a month to illustrate the dangers of a fast-food diet, has died. He was 53.

Spurlock died Thursday in New York from complications of cancer, according to a statement issued Friday by his family.

“It was a sad day, as we said goodbye to my brother Morgan,” Craig Spurlock, who worked with him on several projects, said in the statement. “Morgan gave so much through his art, ideas, and generosity. The world has lost a true creative genius and a special man. I am so proud to have worked together with him.”

Spurlock made a splash in 2004 with his groundbreaking film “Super Size Me,” which was nominated for an Academy Award. The film chronicled the detrimental physical and psychological effects of Spurlock eating only McDonald’s food for 30 days. He gained about 25 pounds, saw a spike in his cholesterol and lost his sex drive.

“Everything’s bigger in America,” he said in the film. “We’ve got the biggest cars, the biggest houses, the biggest companies, the biggest food, and finally: the biggest people.”

In one scene, Spurlock showed kids a photo of George Washington and none recognized the Founding Father. But they all instantly knew the mascots for Wendy’s and McDonald’s.

The film grossed more than $22 million on a $65,000 budget and preceded the release of Eric Schlosser’s influential “Fast Food Nation,” which accused the industry of being bad for the environment and rife with labor issues.

Spurlock returned in 2019 with “Super Size Me 2: Holy Chicken!” — a sober look at an industry that processes 9 billion animals a year in America. He focused on two issues: chicken farmers stuck in a peculiar financial system and the attempt by fast-food chains to deceive customers into thinking they’re eating healthier.

“We’re at an amazing moment in history from a consumer standpoint where consumers are starting to have more and more power,” he told The Associated Press in 2019. “It’s not about return for the shareholders. It’s about return for the consumers.”

Spurlock was a gonzo-like filmmaker who leaned into the bizarre and ridiculous. His stylistic touches included zippy graphics and amusing music, blending a Michael Moore-ish camera-in-your-face style with his own sense of humor and pathos.

“I wanted to be able to lean into the serious moments. I wanted to be able to breathe in the moments of levity. We want to give you permission to laugh in the places where it’s really hard to laugh,” he told the AP.

After he exposed the fast-food and chicken industries, there was an explosion in restaurants stressing freshness, artisanal methods, farm-to-table goodness and ethically sourced ingredients. But nutritionally not much had changed.

“There has been this massive shift and people say to me, ‘So has the food gotten healthier?’ And I say, ‘Well, the marketing sure has,’” he said.

Not all his work dealt with food. Spurlock made documentaries about the boy band One Direction and the geeks and fanboys at Comic-Con. One of his films looked at life behind bars at the Henrico County Jail in Virginia.

With 2008's “Where in the World is Osama bin Laden?” Spurlock went on a global search to find the al-Qaida leader, who was killed in 2011. In “POM Wonderful Presents: The Greatest Movie Ever Sold,” Spurlock tackled questions of product placement, marketing and advertising.

“Being aware is half the battle, I think. Literally knowing all the time when you’re being marketed to is a great thing,” Spurlock told AP at the time. “A lot of people don’t realize it. They can’t see the forest for the trees."

“Super Size Me 2: Holy Chicken!” was to premiere at the Sundance Film Festival in 2017 but it was shelved at the height of the #MeToo movement when Spurlock came forward to detail his own history of sexual misconduct.

He confessed that he had been accused of rape while in college and had settled a sexual harassment case with a female assistant. He also admitted to cheating on numerous partners. “I am part of the problem,” he wrote.

“For me, there was a moment of kind of realization — as somebody who is a truth-teller and somebody who has made it a point of trying to do what’s right — of recognizing that I could do better in my own life. We should be able to admit we were wrong,” he told the AP.

Spurlock grew up in Beckley, West Virginia. His mother was an English teacher who he remembered would correct his work with a red pen. He graduated with a BFA in film from New York University in 1993.

He is survived by two sons — Laken and Kallen; his mother Phyllis Spurlock; father Ben; brothers Craig and Barry; and former spouses Alexandra Jamieson and Sara Bernstein, the mothers of his children.

Mark Kennedy is at http://twitter.com/KennedyTwits

FILE - Morgan Spurlock of the CNN series "Inside Man" poses at the CNN Worldwide All-Star Party, on Friday, Jan. 10, 2014, in Pasadena, Calif. Spurlock, an Oscar-nominee who made food and American diets his life’s work, famously eating only at McDonald’s for a month to illustrate the dangers of a fast-food diet, has died. He was 53. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP, File)

FILE - Morgan Spurlock of the CNN series "Inside Man" poses at the CNN Worldwide All-Star Party, on Friday, Jan. 10, 2014, in Pasadena, Calif. Spurlock, an Oscar-nominee who made food and American diets his life’s work, famously eating only at McDonald’s for a month to illustrate the dangers of a fast-food diet, has died. He was 53. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP, File)

FILE - Director Morgan Spurlock from the film "Focus Forward" poses for a portrait during the 2013 Sundance Film Festival at the Fender Music Lodge on Jan. 21, 2013 in Park City, Utah. Spurlock, an Oscar-nominee who made food and American diets his life’s work, famously eating only at McDonald’s for a month to illustrate the dangers of a fast-food diet, has died. He was 53. (Photo by Victoria Will/Invision/AP, File)

FILE - Director Morgan Spurlock from the film "Focus Forward" poses for a portrait during the 2013 Sundance Film Festival at the Fender Music Lodge on Jan. 21, 2013 in Park City, Utah. Spurlock, an Oscar-nominee who made food and American diets his life’s work, famously eating only at McDonald’s for a month to illustrate the dangers of a fast-food diet, has died. He was 53. (Photo by Victoria Will/Invision/AP, File)

FILE - Filmmaker Morgan Spurlock arrives at the premiere of "Pom Wonderful Presents: The Greatest Movie Ever Sold" in Los Angeles on Wednesday, April 20, 2011. Spurlock, an Oscar-nominee who made food and American diets his life’s work, famously eating only at McDonald’s for a month to illustrate the dangers of a fast-food diet, has died. He was 53. (AP Photo/Matt Sayles, File)

FILE - Filmmaker Morgan Spurlock arrives at the premiere of "Pom Wonderful Presents: The Greatest Movie Ever Sold" in Los Angeles on Wednesday, April 20, 2011. Spurlock, an Oscar-nominee who made food and American diets his life’s work, famously eating only at McDonald’s for a month to illustrate the dangers of a fast-food diet, has died. He was 53. (AP Photo/Matt Sayles, File)

FILE - Morgan Spurlock poses at the Los Angeles premiere of his film "Super Size Me," Thursday night, April 22, 2004, in the Hollywood section of Los Angeles. Spurlock, an Oscar-nominee who made food and American diets his life’s work, famously eating only at McDonald’s for a month to illustrate the dangers of a fast-food diet, has died. He was 53. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

FILE - Morgan Spurlock poses at the Los Angeles premiere of his film "Super Size Me," Thursday night, April 22, 2004, in the Hollywood section of Los Angeles. Spurlock, an Oscar-nominee who made food and American diets his life’s work, famously eating only at McDonald’s for a month to illustrate the dangers of a fast-food diet, has died. He was 53. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

FILE - Filmmaker Morgan Spurlock participate in the BUILD Speaker Series to discuss the film, "Go North", at AOL Studios on Wednesday, Jan. 4, 2017, in New York. Spurlock, an Oscar-nominee who made food and American diets his life’s work, famously eating only at McDonald’s for a month to illustrate the dangers of a fast-food diet, has died. He was 53. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)

FILE - Filmmaker Morgan Spurlock participate in the BUILD Speaker Series to discuss the film, "Go North", at AOL Studios on Wednesday, Jan. 4, 2017, in New York. Spurlock, an Oscar-nominee who made food and American diets his life’s work, famously eating only at McDonald’s for a month to illustrate the dangers of a fast-food diet, has died. He was 53. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)

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