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Successful Airdrop Tests for Oshkosh FMTV A2 LVAD

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Successful Airdrop Tests for Oshkosh FMTV A2 LVAD
News

News

Successful Airdrop Tests for Oshkosh FMTV A2 LVAD

2024-04-22 20:44 Last Updated At:21:00

OSHKOSH, Wis.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Apr 22, 2024--

The U.S. Army Operational Test Command’s Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate (ABNSOTD) recently conducted the final airdrop test of the Oshkosh® Defense FMTV A2 Cargo 6x6 Low-Velocity Airdrop (LVAD). The airdrops, which took place at Fort Liberty in North Carolina, mark a key milestone for the FMTV A2 LVAD program. The tests validated the design and capabilities of the Cargo 6x6 LVAD to ensure its suitability for the stringent demands of airdrop and follow-on operations.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20240422970557/en/

Developed to address the challenges of an aging medium LVAD fleet, the three Oshkosh Defense FMTV A2 LVAD variants, the Cargo 6x6, Cargo 4x4, and Dump Truck 6x6, are each engineered to fulfill a critical need for the Airborne community.

“We are extremely pleased with the results of the FMTV A2 LVAD airdrop tests,” stated Pat Williams, chief programs officer at Oshkosh Defense. “This is an integral step in delivering the FMTV A2 LVAD capability that underscores our commitment to partnering with the U.S. Army to deliver mission-critical tactical vehicles that meet the needs of the modern battlefield.”

The FMTV A2 Cargo 6x6 LVAD successfully demonstrated its ability to withstand the rigors of an airdrop, maintain structural integrity upon landing and complete the post-drop road maneuvers. In 2023, the Cargo 6x6 LVAD prototype completed Rollover Protection Structures (ROPS), RIGEX (Rigging Exercises), Roller Loading, and Simulated Airdrop Impact Testing (SAIT). The Cargo 4x4 and Dump Truck LVAD variants will undergo similar testing in 2024.

About Oshkosh Defense

Oshkosh Defense is a global leader in the design, production and sustainment of best-in-class military vehicles, technology solutions and mobility systems. Oshkosh develops and applies emerging technologies that advance safety and mission success. Setting the industry standard for sustaining fleet readiness, Oshkosh ensures every solution is supported worldwide throughout its entire life cycle.

Oshkosh Defense, LLC is an Oshkosh Corporation company [NYSE: OSK]. Learn more about Oshkosh Defense at www.oshkoshdefense.com.

About Oshkosh Corporation

At Oshkosh (NYSE: OSK), we make innovative, mission-critical equipment to help everyday heroes advance communities around the world. Headquartered in Wisconsin, Oshkosh Corporation employs approximately 17,000 team members worldwide, all united behind a common purpose: to make a difference in people’s lives. Oshkosh products can be found in more than 150 countries under the brands of JLG®, Hinowa, Power Towers, Pierce®, MAXIMETAL, Oshkosh® Defense, McNeilus®, IMT®, Jerr-Dan®, Frontline™ Communications, Oshkosh® Airport Products, JBT AeroTech and Pratt Miller. For more information, visit www.oshkoshcorp.com.

®, ™ All brand names referred to in this news release are trademarks of Oshkosh Corporation or its subsidiary companies.

Forward Looking Statements

This news release contains statements that the Company believes to be “forward-looking statements” within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. All statements other than statements of historical fact, including, without limitation, statements regarding the Company’s future financial position, business strategy, targets, projected sales, costs, earnings, capital expenditures, debt levels and cash flows, and plans and objectives of management for future operations, are forward-looking statements. When used in this news release, words such as “may,” “will,” “expect,” “intend,” “estimate,” “anticipate,” “believe,” “should,” “project” or “plan” or the negative thereof or variations thereon or similar terminology are generally intended to identify forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements are not guarantees of future performance and are subject to risks, uncertainties, assumptions, and other factors, some of which are beyond the Company’s control, which could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements. These factors include risks related to the Company’s ability to successfully execute on its strategic road map and meet its long-term financial goals. Additional information concerning these and other factors is contained in the Company’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. All forward-looking statements speak only as of the date of this news release. The Company assumes no obligation, and disclaims any obligation, to update information contained in this news release. Investors should be aware that the Company may not update such information until the Company’s next quarterly earnings conference call, if at all.

Oshkosh FMTV A2 LVAD Airdrop Tests Successful (Photo: U.S. Army)

Oshkosh FMTV A2 LVAD Airdrop Tests Successful (Photo: U.S. Army)

NEW YORK (AP) — Closing arguments in Donald Trump 's historic hush money trial are set to begin Tuesday morning, giving prosecutors and defense attorneys one final opportunity to convince the jury of their respective cases before deliberations begin.

Jurors will undertake the unprecedented task of deciding whether to convict the former U.S. president of felony criminal charges stemming from hush money payments tied to an alleged scheme to buy and bury stories that might wreck Trump's 2016 presidential campaign.

At the heart of the charges are reimbursements paid to Michael Cohen for a $130,000 hush money payment that was paid to porn actor Stormy Daniels in exchange for not going public with her claim about a 2006 sexual encounter with Trump.

Prosecutors say the payments to Cohen, Trump's then-lawyer, were falsely logged as “legal expenses” to hide the true nature of the transactions.

Trump has denied all wrongdoing.

He pleaded not guilty to 34 counts of falsifying business records, charges which are punishable by up to four years in prison.

Closing arguments are expected to last all day Tuesday, with jury deliberations beginning as soon as Wednesday.

The case is the first of Trump's four indictments to go to trial as he seeks to reclaim the White House from Democrat Joe Biden.

The other cases center on charges of illegally hoarding classified documents at his estate in Palm Beach, Florida, and conspiring to overturn the 2020 presidential election. It’s unclear whether any of them will reach trial before the November election.

Currently:

— Here’s what every key witness said at Donald Trump’s hush money trial

— As Trump’s hush money trial nears end, would-be spectators camp out for days to get inside

— Closing arguments, jury instructions and maybe a verdict? Major week looms

— Trump hush money case: A timeline of key events

— Key players: Who’s who at Trump’s hush money criminal trial

— Hush money, catch and kill and more: A guide to unique terms used at Trump’s trial

Here's the latest:

Prosecutors and defense lawyers will have their final opportunity to address the jury in closing arguments.

The arguments don’t count as evidence in the case charging Donald Trump with falsifying business records to cover up hush money payments during the 2016 presidential election. They’ll instead function as hourslong recaps of the key points the lawyers want to leave jurors with before the panel disappears behind closed doors for deliberations.

Jurors over the course of a month have heard testimony about sex and bookkeeping, tabloid journalism and presidential politics. Their task ahead will be to decide whether prosecutors who have charged Trump with 34 counts of falsifying business records have proved their case beyond a reasonable doubt.

With closing arguments in Donald Trump's hush money trial expected to get underway Tuesday morning, jurors have a weighty task ahead of them — deciding whether to convict the former U.S. president of some, all or none of the 34 felony counts he's charged with.

To convict Trump of felony falsifying business records, prosecutors must convince jurors beyond a reasonable doubt that he not only falsified or caused business records to be entered falsely but also did so with intent to commit or conceal another crime. Any verdict must be unanimous.

To prevent a conviction, the defense simply needs to convince at least one juror that prosecutors haven’t proved Trump’s guilt beyond a reasonable doubt, the standard for criminal cases.

New York also has a misdemeanor falsifying business records charge, which requires proving only that a defendant made or caused the false entries, but it is not part of Trump’s case and will not be considered by jurors.

For many Americans, Memorial Day weekend was a moment to remember the sacrifices of U.S. military personnel and to unplug from the bustle of daily life.

For others, it was a chance to snag a prime spot in line for entry into Donald Trump's hush money trial ahead of Tuesday's closing arguments. Last Friday afternoon saw several people camped out — including professional line sitters with pup tents — for a chance to see the tail end of the historic proceedings up close and personal.

Though most of the seats inside the courtroom are reserved for lawyers, members of Trump’s entourage, security personnel and journalists, a few are open to the general public.

The former president's Manhattan trial has drawn visitors from all over, including students from local schools and plenty of out-of-towners.

Closing arguments in Donald Trump's hush money trial are expected to begin on Tuesday, marking the beginning of the end of the historic proceedings that kicked off in April.

Prosecutors and defense lawyers will make their final pitch to jurors, hoping to sway them in one direction or another after more than four weeks of witness testimony.

Following the conclusion of closing arguments, which are expected to last all day, Judge Juan M. Merchan will spend about an hour instructing the jury on the law governing the case, providing a roadmap for what it can and cannot take into account as it evaluates the Republican former president’s guilt or innocence.

Jurors could begin deliberations as early as Wednesday.

Former President Donald Trump speaks with his attorney Todd Blanche during in his trial, Tuesday, May 21, 2024, in Manhattan Criminal Court in New York. Looking on, from left are. U.S. Rep. Dale Strong, R-Ala. Texas Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick, radio host Sebastian Gorka and U.S. Rep. Troy Nehls, R-Texas. (Curtis Means/Dailymail.com via AP, Pool)

Former President Donald Trump speaks with his attorney Todd Blanche during in his trial, Tuesday, May 21, 2024, in Manhattan Criminal Court in New York. Looking on, from left are. U.S. Rep. Dale Strong, R-Ala. Texas Lt. Gov. Dan Patrick, radio host Sebastian Gorka and U.S. Rep. Troy Nehls, R-Texas. (Curtis Means/Dailymail.com via AP, Pool)

Former President Donald Trump speaks alongside his attorney Todd Blanche following the day's proceedings in his trial Tuesday, May 21, 2024, in Manhattan Criminal Court in New York. (Michael M. Santiago/Pool Photo via AP)

Former President Donald Trump speaks alongside his attorney Todd Blanche following the day's proceedings in his trial Tuesday, May 21, 2024, in Manhattan Criminal Court in New York. (Michael M. Santiago/Pool Photo via AP)

FILE - Former President Donald Trump sits in Manhattan criminal court, May 21, 2024, in New York. Trump has spent the majority of his time as a criminal defendant sitting nearly motionless, for hours, leaning back in his chair with his eyes closed, so zen he often appeared to be asleep. It is, at least in part, a strategy in response to warnings that behaving like he has in past trials could backfire. (Justin Lane/Pool Photo via AP, File)

FILE - Former President Donald Trump sits in Manhattan criminal court, May 21, 2024, in New York. Trump has spent the majority of his time as a criminal defendant sitting nearly motionless, for hours, leaning back in his chair with his eyes closed, so zen he often appeared to be asleep. It is, at least in part, a strategy in response to warnings that behaving like he has in past trials could backfire. (Justin Lane/Pool Photo via AP, File)

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