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Milwaukee man charged in dismemberment death pleads not guilty

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Milwaukee man charged in dismemberment death pleads not guilty
News

News

Milwaukee man charged in dismemberment death pleads not guilty

2024-04-23 07:49 Last Updated At:08:01

SOUTH MILWAUKEE (AP) — A Milwaukee man charged with killing and mutilating a woman whose body parts washed up on a beach along Lake Michigan pleaded not guilty during a court appearance Monday.

Maxwell Anderson, 33, of Milwaukee, entered the plea to charges of first-degree intentional homicide, mutilating a corpse and arson in the death of Sade Robinson, 19.

Anderson waived his right to a preliminary hearing. He's due back in Milwaukee County Circuit Court on May 16, local news outlets reported.

The court appearance was Anderson's first since his arrest on April 4, two days after a leg believed to belong to Robinson was found by a passerby down a bluff at Warnimont Park along Lake Michigan in Cudahy. The leg had been severed just below the hip.

A torso and an arm believed to belong to Robinson were found Thursday morning along a remote stretch of tree-lined beach in South Milwaukee about a quarter of a mile (400 meters) from an apartment complex, the Milwaukee County Sheriff’s Office said.

Anderson is being held on a $5 million bond.

A phone message seeking comment was left Monday evening for one of his attorneys, Anthony Cotton.

Robinson was reported missing April 2 by a friend. An employee of the building where Robinson lived told police that Robinson was excited about a date she had planned for April 1, according to the complaint.

Surveillance video from a restaurant showed Robinson and Anderson sitting together at the bar on the evening of April 1. Her burned car was found the next morning.

FILE - This March 2024 photo provided by the Wisconsin Department of Corrections shows Maxwell Anderson, who was charged Friday, April 12, 2024, in the slaying of a woman whose dismembered leg was found near a beach down a bluff along Lake Michigan near Milwaukee. Anderson pleaded not guilty to the charges during a court appearance Monday, April 22. (Wisconsin Department of Corrections via AP, File)

FILE - This March 2024 photo provided by the Wisconsin Department of Corrections shows Maxwell Anderson, who was charged Friday, April 12, 2024, in the slaying of a woman whose dismembered leg was found near a beach down a bluff along Lake Michigan near Milwaukee. Anderson pleaded not guilty to the charges during a court appearance Monday, April 22. (Wisconsin Department of Corrections via AP, File)

FILE - In this image taken from video, Maxwell Anderson is led into the courtroom for his initial appearance, Friday, April 12, 2024, in Milwaukee. Anderson, charged with killing and mutilating a woman whose body parts have washed up on a beach along Lake Michigan, pleaded not guilty to those charges during a court appearance Monday, April 22. (WDJT-TV via AP, File)

FILE - In this image taken from video, Maxwell Anderson is led into the courtroom for his initial appearance, Friday, April 12, 2024, in Milwaukee. Anderson, charged with killing and mutilating a woman whose body parts have washed up on a beach along Lake Michigan, pleaded not guilty to those charges during a court appearance Monday, April 22. (WDJT-TV via AP, File)

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Group of graduates walk out of Harvard commencement chanting 'Free, free Palestine'

2024-05-24 05:48 Last Updated At:05:51

CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (AP) — Hundreds of students in graduation robes walked out of the Harvard commencement on Thursday chanting “Free, free Palestine” after weeks of protests on campus and a day after the school announced that 13 Harvard students who participated in a protest encampment would not be able to receive diplomas alongside their classmates.

Some students chanted “Let them walk, let them walk” during Thursday’s commencement, referring to allowing those 13 students to get their diplomas along with fellow graduates.

Student speaker Shruthi Kumar said “this semester our freedom of speech and our expressions of solidarity became punishable,” she said to cheers and applause.

She said she had to recognize “the 13 undergraduates in the class of 2024 who will not graduate today,” generating prolonged cheers and clapping from graduates. “I am deeply disappointed by the intolerance for freedom of speech and the right to civil disobedience on campus.”

Over 1,500 students had petitioned, and nearly 500 staff and faculty had spoken up, all over the sanctions, she said.

“This is about civil rights and upholding democratic principles,” she said. “The students had spoken. The faculty had spoken. Harvard do you hear us?”

Those in the encampment had called for a ceasefire in Gaza and for Harvard to divest from companies that support the war.

Commencement speaker Maria Ressa, a journalist and advocate for freedom of the press, told the graduates that “you don't know who you are until you're tested, until you fight for what you believe in. Because that defines who you are.”

“The campus protests are testing everyone in America. Protests are healthy. They shouldn't be violent. They shouldn't be silenced,” she said.

Asmer Asrar Safi was one of the 13 students blocked from receiving a diploma Thursday. The penalty shows how far the school will go to silence voices that challenge their donor base, he said.

“While we will not be returning to this school, we hope that our friends carry the liberatory legacy of the Gaza solidarity encampment alive, and strive even harder for divestment,” he said in a written statement.

Alaha Nasari, who graduated with a degree in the history of science and global health, said she and other students opted to walk out of the ceremonies when interim President Alan Garber took to the stage.

“I think that the lack of faculty support has been one of the most disheartening aspects of being a student protester,” she said.

Also on Thursday, the presidents of Northwestern and Rutgers universities defended their decisions to end pro-Palestinian encampments through negotiations rather than police force, telling the House Committee on Education and the Workforce that they defused the danger on their campuses without ceding ground to protesters. The hearing was part of a series examining how colleges have responded to allegations of antisemitism.

The decision by Harvard's top governing board follows a recommendation Monday by faculty members to allow the 13 to receive their degrees despite their participation in the encampment.

However, Harvard’s governing board said that each of the 13 were found to have violated the university’s policies by their conduct during the encampment protest.

“In coming to this determination, we note that the express provisions of the Harvard College Student Handbook state that students who are not in good standing are not eligible for degrees,” the Harvard Corporation said in a written statement.

The statement left open the possibility of an appeals process.

Supporters of the students at Harvard said the decision not to allow them to receive degrees at commencement violated a May 14 agreement between Garber and the Harvard Out of Occupied Palestine coalition that would have allowed the students to graduate.

Protesters against the war between Israel and Hamas voluntarily dismantled their tents after they said university officials agreed to discuss questions about the endowment, bringing a peaceful end to the kinds of demonstrations that were broken up by police on other campuses.

The group issued a statement late Wednesday saying the decision jeopardizes the post-graduation lives of the 13 students.

“By rejecting a democratic faculty vote, the Corporation has proved itself to be a wholly illegitimate body, and Garber an illegitimate president,” the group said.

There was a noticeable presence of police officers around the campus Thursday mixing with soon-to-be-graduates, their family members and sidewalk flower sellers.

A small plane circled above, trailing an Israeli and U.S. flag. A truck was parked outside the campus with an electronic billboard with the names and images of some of the pro-Palestinian protesters under the banner: “Harvard’s Leading Antisemites.”

At Drexel University in Philadelphia, protesters packed up their belongings and left a pro-Palestinian encampment Thursday after the school announced a decision to have police clear the encampment. A wave of pro-Palestinian tent encampments on campuses has led to over 3,000 arrests nationwide.

Rathke reported from Marshfield, Vt.

Graduating students hold Palestinian flags and chant as they walk out in protest over the 13 students who have been barred from graduating due to protest activities, during commencement in Harvard Yard, at Harvard University, in Cambridge, Mass., Thursday, May 23, 2024. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

Graduating students hold Palestinian flags and chant as they walk out in protest over the 13 students who have been barred from graduating due to protest activities, during commencement in Harvard Yard, at Harvard University, in Cambridge, Mass., Thursday, May 23, 2024. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

Students celebrate during commencement in Harvard Yard at Harvard University, in Cambridge, Mass., Thursday, May 23, 2024. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

Students celebrate during commencement in Harvard Yard at Harvard University, in Cambridge, Mass., Thursday, May 23, 2024. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

Keynote speaker Maria Ressa, a journalist and advocate for freedom of the press, addresses students during commencement in Harvard Yard, at Harvard University, in Cambridge, Mass., Thursday, May 23, 2024. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

Keynote speaker Maria Ressa, a journalist and advocate for freedom of the press, addresses students during commencement in Harvard Yard, at Harvard University, in Cambridge, Mass., Thursday, May 23, 2024. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

Keynote speaker Maria Ressa, a journalist and advocate for freedom of the press, addresses graduates in Harvard Yard during commencement at Harvard University, Thursday, May 23, 2024, in Cambridge, Mass. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

Keynote speaker Maria Ressa, a journalist and advocate for freedom of the press, addresses graduates in Harvard Yard during commencement at Harvard University, Thursday, May 23, 2024, in Cambridge, Mass. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

Keynote speaker Maria Ressa, a journalist and advocate for freedom of the press, addresses graduates in Harvard Yard during commencement at Harvard University, Thursday, May 23, 2024, in Cambridge, Mass. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

Keynote speaker Maria Ressa, a journalist and advocate for freedom of the press, addresses graduates in Harvard Yard during commencement at Harvard University, Thursday, May 23, 2024, in Cambridge, Mass. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

Keynote speaker Maria Ressa, a journalist and advocate for freedom of the press, addresses graduates in Harvard Yard during commencement at Harvard University, Thursday, May 23, 2024, in Cambridge, Mass. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

Keynote speaker Maria Ressa, a journalist and advocate for freedom of the press, addresses graduates in Harvard Yard during commencement at Harvard University, Thursday, May 23, 2024, in Cambridge, Mass. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

A student displays the Palestinian flag on his mortar board as graduates take their seats in Harvard Yard during commencement at Harvard University, Thursday, May 23, 2024, in Cambridge, Mass. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

A student displays the Palestinian flag on his mortar board as graduates take their seats in Harvard Yard during commencement at Harvard University, Thursday, May 23, 2024, in Cambridge, Mass. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

Phoebe Carter, who will graduate from the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences later in the day, watches as students march to their seats in Harvard Yard during commencement at Harvard University, Thursday, May 23, 2024, in Cambridge, Mass. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

Phoebe Carter, who will graduate from the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences later in the day, watches as students march to their seats in Harvard Yard during commencement at Harvard University, Thursday, May 23, 2024, in Cambridge, Mass. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

A student holds up the flag of Palestine as the 13 students, who have been barred from graduating due to protest activities, are recognized by a student address speaker during the commencement in Harvard Yard at Harvard University, Thursday, May 23, 2024, in Cambridge, Mass. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

A student holds up the flag of Palestine as the 13 students, who have been barred from graduating due to protest activities, are recognized by a student address speaker during the commencement in Harvard Yard at Harvard University, Thursday, May 23, 2024, in Cambridge, Mass. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

Graduating students chant as they depart commencement in protest to the 13 graduating seniors who were not allowed to participate due to protest activities, in Harvard Yard during commencement at Harvard University, Thursday, May 23, 2024, in Cambridge, Mass. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

Graduating students chant as they depart commencement in protest to the 13 graduating seniors who were not allowed to participate due to protest activities, in Harvard Yard during commencement at Harvard University, Thursday, May 23, 2024, in Cambridge, Mass. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

Graduating students chant as they depart commencement in protest to the 13 graduating seniors who were not allowed to participate due to protest activities, in Harvard Yard during commencement at Harvard University, Thursday, May 23, 2024, in Cambridge, Mass. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

Graduating students chant as they depart commencement in protest to the 13 graduating seniors who were not allowed to participate due to protest activities, in Harvard Yard during commencement at Harvard University, Thursday, May 23, 2024, in Cambridge, Mass. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

Harvard University students pass protestors while filing into Harvard Yard for commencement at Harvard University, Thursday, May 23, 2024, in Cambridge, Mass. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

Harvard University students pass protestors while filing into Harvard Yard for commencement at Harvard University, Thursday, May 23, 2024, in Cambridge, Mass. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

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