Skip to Content Facebook Feature Image

SURFER Announces New Editor-in-Chief, Special Edition Print Magazine

News

SURFER Announces New Editor-in-Chief, Special Edition Print Magazine
News

News

SURFER Announces New Editor-in-Chief, Special Edition Print Magazine

2024-04-23 19:02 Last Updated At:19:21

NEW YORK--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Apr 23, 2024--

The Arena Group announces the return of SURFER with a special print edition due out this summer. First published in 1960, this marks the revival of premium surf journalism, world-class photography, as well as a number of other exciting projects in the works.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20240423267057/en/

The relaunch of SURFER coincides with the appointment of Jake Howard as the brand’s new editor-in-chief. A fixture in the surf publishing world for more than 25 years, he brings a wide array of experiences to the role, including previously serving as managing editor for SURFER and senior editor for the World Surf League. He launched RedBullSurfing.com in 2009, and has covered the sport for ESPN, The Surfer’s Journal, Surfline, as well as provided marketing expertise for leading brands including Quiksilver, Roxy and Rip Curl. Now returning to SURFER since first working for the publication in 2000, Howard, along with a talented, dynamic team, will lead the charge into the future.

“To have a seat at the editor’s desk of SURFER, it’s a dream. In 1960, John Severson published the first issue of SURFER, and to be able to carry on that tradition and legacy, it’s a tremendous honor,” said Jake Howard, Editor-in-Chief of SURFER. “This special print edition will lead SURFER into a new era while upholding our commitment to capturing the true spirit of surfing through elevated storytelling, photography and film projects.”

The upcoming magazine will be comprised of exclusive features from the most authoritative voices in the sport. From barefoot adventures, to words of wisdom from surf heroes, to an elevated surf photography experience, every page will offer a riveting dive into the sport, culture and lifestyle of surfing.

“Jake’s return to SURFER brings an exciting new edge to this iconic brand,” said Natasha Cholerton-Brown, General Manager, Adventure Sports Network at The Arena Group. "His incredible background, connections to the surf world and core industry channels, coupled with his top-class editorial sensibilities, will undoubtedly usher in a new generation of readers to SURFER."

The print edition of the magazine will be available for sale on August 20, 2024. The first 50 buyers on SURFER.com will receive a special gift box containing SURFER gifts and merchandise.

About The Arena Group

The Arena Group (NYSE American: AREN) is an innovative technology platform and media company with a proven cutting-edge playbook that transforms media brands. Our unified technology platform empowers creators and publishers with tools to publish and monetize their content, while also leveraging quality journalism of anchor brands like TheStreet, Parade, Men’s Journal and Athlon Sports to build their businesses. The company aggregates content across a diverse portfolio of over 265 brands, reaching over 100 million users monthly. Visit us at thearenagroup.net and discover how we are revolutionizing the world of digital media.

Forward Looking Statements

This press release includes statements that constitute forward-looking statements. Forward-looking statements may be identified by the use of words such as “forecast,” “guidance,” “plan,” “estimate,” “will,” “would,” “project,” “maintain,” “intend,” “expect,” “anticipate,” “prospect,” “strategy,” “future,” “likely,” “may,” “should,” “believe,” “continue,” “opportunity,” “potential,” and other similar expressions that predict or indicate future events or trends or that are not statements of historical matters, and include, for example, statements related to the proposed strategic transaction with Simplify Inventions, including the Company’s ability to complete the transaction and the potential benefits thereof, the Company’s anticipated restructuring of its indebtedness, the Company’s anticipated future expenses and investments, business strategy and plans, expectations relating to its industry, market conditions and market trends and growth, market position and potential market opportunities, and objectives for future operations. These forward-looking statements are based on information available at the time the statements are made and/or management’s good faith belief as of that time with respect to future events and are subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed in or suggested by the forward-looking statements. Factors that could cause or contribute to such differences include, but are not limited to, the ability of the Company to expand its verticals; the Company’s ability to grow its subscribers; the Company’s ability to grow its advertising revenue; general economic uncertainty in key global markets and a worsening of global economic conditions or low levels of economic growth; the effects of steps that the Company could take to reduce operating costs; the remaining effects of the COVID-19 pandemic and impact on the demand for the Company products; the inability of the Company to sustain profitable sales growth; circumstances or developments that may make the Company unable to implement or realize the anticipated benefits, or that may increase the costs, of its current and planned business initiatives; and those factors detailed by the Company in its public filings with the SEC, including its Annual Reports on Form 10-K and Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q. Important factors that could cause actual results relating to the pending transaction with Bridge Media Networks to differ materially from such plans, estimates or expectations include, among others: (1) that one or more closing conditions to the transactions, including certain regulatory approvals, may not be satisfied or waived, on a timely basis or otherwise, including that a governmental entity may prohibit, delay or refuse to grant approval for the consummation of the proposed transactions, may require conditions, limitations or restrictions in connection with such approvals or that the required approval by the stockholders of The Arena Group may not be obtained; (2) the risk that the proposed transactions may not be completed in the time frame expected by the parties, or at all; (3) unexpected costs, charges or expenses resulting from the proposed transactions; (4) uncertainty of the expected financial performance of the combined company following completion of the proposed transactions; (5) failure to realize the anticipated benefits of the proposed transactions, including as a result of delay in completing the proposed transactions or integrating Bridge Media Networks and The Arena Group; (6) the ability of the combined company to implement its business strategy; (7) difficulties and delays in achieving revenue and cost synergies of the combined company; (8) any inability to retain and hire key personnel; (9) the occurrence of any event that could give rise to termination of the proposed transactions; (10) potential litigation in connection with the proposed transactions or other settlements or investigations that may affect the timing or occurrence of the proposed transactions or result in significant costs of defense, indemnification and liability; (11) evolving legal, regulatory and tax regimes; (12) changes in economic, financial, political and regulatory conditions, in the United States and elsewhere, and other factors that contribute to uncertainty and volatility, including natural and man-made disasters, civil unrest, pandemics, geopolitical uncertainty and conditions that may result from legislative, regulatory, trade and policy changes associated with the current or subsequent U.S. administration; (13) the ability of Bridge Media Networks, The Arena Group and the combined company to successfully recover from a disaster or other business continuity problem due to a hurricane, flood, earthquake, terrorist attack, war, pandemic, security breach, cyber-attack, power loss, telecommunications failure or other natural or man-made event; (14) the impact of public health crises, such as pandemics and epidemics and any related company or governmental policies and actions to protect the health and safety of individuals or governmental policies or actions to maintain the functioning of national or global economies and markets; (15) actions by third parties, including government agencies; (16) potential adverse reactions or changes to business relationships resulting from the announcement or completion of the transactions; (17) the risk that disruptions from the proposed transactions will harm Bridge Media Networks and The Arena Group, including current plans and operations; (18) certain restrictions during the pendency of the acquisition that may impact Bridge Media Networks’ or The Arena Group’s ability to pursue certain business opportunities or strategic transactions; (19) Bridge Media Networks’, The Arena Group’s and the combined company’s ability to meet expectations regarding the accounting and tax treatments of the proposed transactions; (20) delays in Bridge Media Networks attracting advertisers or executing its business growth strategy; (21) continued fragmentation of audiences and a reduction in the number of television subscribers; (22) decreases in advertising spending or advertising demand or the demand for Bridge Media Networks programming; (23) increased competition for programing, audiences and advertisers; (24) loss of Bridge Media Networks’ key affiliate customer, Agency 5; (25) changes in government regulations, licensing requirements, or FCC’s rules and regulations and the applicability of such rules and regulations to Bridge Media Networks; (26) failure to identify strategic acquisitions candidates or achieve the desired results of strategic acquisitions; (27) loss of material intellectual property rights of Bridge Media’s programming, technology, digital and other content; (28) labor disputes, increasing demand for creative talent and union activity; (29) loss of key employees or the inability to attract and retain skilled employees; (30) inability to or limitations on raising additional capital in the future. The foregoing list of factors is not exhaustive and (31) and those factors detailed by the Company in its public filings with the SEC, including its Annual Reports on Form 10-K and Quarterly Reports on Form 10-Q. Should one or more of these risks, uncertainties, or facts materialize, or should underlying assumptions prove incorrect, actual results may vary materially from those indicated or anticipated by the forward-looking statements contained herein. Accordingly, you are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date they are made. Forward-looking statements should not be read as a guarantee of future performance or results and will not necessarily be accurate indications of the times at, or by, which such performance or results will be achieved. Except as required under the federal securities laws and the rules and regulations of the SEC, we do not have any intention or obligation to update publicly any forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events, or otherwise.

Jake Howard, New Editor-in-Chief of SURFER (Photo: Business Wire)

Jake Howard, New Editor-in-Chief of SURFER (Photo: Business Wire)

Bayer Leverkusen is two games from European soccer immortality.

The new champion of Germany has two cup finals in four days — starting Wednesday in the Europa League against Atalanta — to complete a previously unthinkable unbeaten season in domestic and continental competition.

On Saturday, Leverkusen will be heavily favored to win the German cup final against a Kaiserslautern team that finished 13th in the second division, not so far from falling into relegation playoffs.

And so the biggest remaining challenge for coach Xabi Alonso’s team is game No. 52 of 53, in Dublin against an Atalanta that is finishing the season strong.

It feels fitting because the Europa League has been a regular drama for Leverkusen.

Three times in six games in the knockout rounds the team was 2-0 down deep into the second half and still behind entering stoppage time: In both round of 16 games against Qarabag and in the semifinals return leg against Roma.

In another streak-saving Europa game, at West Ham in the quarterfinals, Leverkusen was set to advance on aggregate score yet needed an 89th-minute goal by wing-back Jeremie Frimpong to draw 1-1 and stay unbeaten.

“We don’t want to wait until the last seconds of the game,” said Patrick Schick, whose three stoppage-time goals against Qarabag in March were key to advancing 5-4 on aggregate. “We would like to make it clear, really, earlier.”

There have been other stellar teams in European soccer who added the elite Champions League to their domestic league title, unlike Leverkusen playing in the second-tier Europa League.

Still, Manchester United in 1999, Inter Milan in 2010, Barcelona in 2011 and Manchester City last year were wealthy clubs whose success could have been expected. Each started their season with established, star-packed teams led by coaches — Alex Ferguson, Jose Mourinho, Pep Guardiola — who'd already won multiple domestic and European trophies.

This is Alonso’s first full season coaching at the top level. His team was in relegation trouble last season. There was no superstar transfer signing in the offseason.

“For me it’s very special,” the 42-year-old Alonso said last week. “My first title as a coach was the Bundesliga. It was super, it was very special. But a title in Europe would be wonderful and hopefully we will be able to say that.”

Alonso twice won the Champions League as an elegant midfielder, with Liverpool and then Real Madrid, who will play Borussia Dortmund for this season’s Champions League title. That June 1 final at Wembley Stadium is between two teams involved in the failed Super League breakaway in 2021 — Madrid driving it forward, Dortmund declining its invitation.

Bayer Leverkusen and Atalanta were nowhere close to being invited to the breakaway three years ago and today represent soccer projects that won respect from neutral fans across Europe.

Both are based in provincial cities, each with more than 100 years of history, reaching surprise peaks. Before this season, they had only ever won three trophies: Atalanta’s Italian cup in 1963 and Leverkusen’s 1988 UEFA Cup – the forerunner of the Europa League – and Germany cup in 1993.

While Leverkusen once lost a Champions League final, to Madrid in 2002, and Atalanta was minutes away from a semifinals place in 2020, neither has felt entitled to European success.

Their modest stadiums in Leverkusen and Bergamo add up to a combined capacity of about 51,000 that could fit into the Dublin venue, formerly Lansdowne Road, that will host them Wednesday. For a showpiece European final, the official limit is 48,000.

Leverkusen and Atalanta do not figure in UEFA research of the top-50 earnings list of European clubs for total matchday income from ticket and hospitality sales.

Two well-run clubs, relying on smart transfer dealings — albeit underwritten, respectively, by pharmaceutical giant Bayer and Boston Celtics co-owner Steve Pagliuca — had combined total revenues last year that added up to about the same $500 million as Manchester City’s player wage bill alone.

Yet both Leverkusen and Atalanta, under coach Gian Piero Gasperini since 2016, play easy-on-the-eye soccer in attack and team-first defense.

“They play one against one on the whole pitch,” Schick said of Atalanta. “Wherever you move, you have one defender behind you so they don’t leave you the space to breathe.”

Atalanta has been a refreshing force under Gasperini and already has a place in the Champions League next season. In any normal year they would be popular first-time European title winners.

What Leverkusen has done is not normal, though, and a legend could be just days from being created.

AP soccer: https://apnews.com/hub/soccer

Leverkusen team poses prior to the start of the Europa League second leg semi-final soccer match between Leverkusen and Roma at the BayArena in Leverkusen, Germany, Thursday, May 9, 2024. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader)

Leverkusen team poses prior to the start of the Europa League second leg semi-final soccer match between Leverkusen and Roma at the BayArena in Leverkusen, Germany, Thursday, May 9, 2024. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader)

Atalanta players celebrate at the end of the Europa League semifinal second leg soccer match between Atalanta and Marseille at the Bergamo's stadium, in Bergamo, Italy, Thursday, May 9, 2024. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)

Atalanta players celebrate at the end of the Europa League semifinal second leg soccer match between Atalanta and Marseille at the Bergamo's stadium, in Bergamo, Italy, Thursday, May 9, 2024. (AP Photo/Antonio Calanni)

Atalanta coach Gian Piero Gasperini attends a Media Open Day at the Giulio Onesti Olympic Center in Rome, Italy, Thursday, May 16, 2024. Atalanta will play Bayer Leverkusen in the Europa League soccer final scheduled for May 22, 2024 in Dublin. (Alfredo Falcone/LaPresse via AP)

Atalanta coach Gian Piero Gasperini attends a Media Open Day at the Giulio Onesti Olympic Center in Rome, Italy, Thursday, May 16, 2024. Atalanta will play Bayer Leverkusen in the Europa League soccer final scheduled for May 22, 2024 in Dublin. (Alfredo Falcone/LaPresse via AP)

Leverkusen's Josip Stanisic, center, scores a goal during the Europa League second leg semi-final soccer match between Leverkusen and Roma at the BayArena in Leverkusen, Germany, Thursday, May 9, 2024. (Bernd Thissen/dpa via AP)

Leverkusen's Josip Stanisic, center, scores a goal during the Europa League second leg semi-final soccer match between Leverkusen and Roma at the BayArena in Leverkusen, Germany, Thursday, May 9, 2024. (Bernd Thissen/dpa via AP)

Leverkusen's head coach Xabi Alonso celebrates with the trophy as his team won the German Bundesliga, after the German Bundesliga soccer match between Bayer Leverkusen and FC Augsburg at the BayArena in Leverkusen, Germany, Saturday, May 18, 2024. Bayer Leverkusen have won the Bundesliga title for the first time. It is the first team in Bundesliga history, that won the championship unbeaten for the whole season. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)

Leverkusen's head coach Xabi Alonso celebrates with the trophy as his team won the German Bundesliga, after the German Bundesliga soccer match between Bayer Leverkusen and FC Augsburg at the BayArena in Leverkusen, Germany, Saturday, May 18, 2024. Bayer Leverkusen have won the Bundesliga title for the first time. It is the first team in Bundesliga history, that won the championship unbeaten for the whole season. (AP Photo/Martin Meissner)

Recommended Articles