Skip to Content Facebook Feature Image

Onto Innovation Debuts Sub-surface Defect Inspection for Advanced Packaging

News

Onto Innovation Debuts Sub-surface Defect Inspection for Advanced Packaging
News

News

Onto Innovation Debuts Sub-surface Defect Inspection for Advanced Packaging

2024-04-23 19:32 Last Updated At:20:01

WILMINGTON, Mass.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Apr 23, 2024--

Onto Innovation Inc. (NYSE: ONTO) today announced the release of a new sub-surface inspection capability for the Dragonfly ® G3 sub-micron 2D/3D inspection and metrology platform. The new capability enables whole wafer inspection for critical yield impacting defects that can lead to lost die as well as entire wafers breaking in subsequent process steps. Such defects were previously impossible to find in a production environment. In today’s world of wafer thinning and multi-layer wafer or die bonding, sub-surface defects are far more dangerous than ever before as bonded layers are now a tenth of their former thickness and far more brittle and therefore more susceptible to damage pre- or post-bonding. Sub-surface defects that occur during the bonding or thinning process such as micro-cracks can cause not only die yield issues, but wafers can be shattered resulting in the loss of hundreds of die in an instant.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20240423254870/en/

Now, Onto Innovation is offering the capability to detect these yield killing defects on the well-established Dragonfly platform at production speeds. By using novel infra-red (IR) technology and specially designed algorithms, the Dragonfly platform provides customers a choice to scan the entire wafer for hidden defects rather than be limited to sampling only selected areas of the wafer. This greatly impacts final yield and cost savings through reduced scrapped wafer/die stacks.

“Customers are demanding 100% inspection capability with production-worthy throughput,” says Mayson Brooks, vice president and general manager of Onto’s inspection business. “The Dragonfly G3 system’s new high speed IR capability delivers just that, combined with the flexibility to select from multiple objective lenses allowing customers to inspect at different magnifications for different applications and devices.”

“The Dragonfly G3 system with its enhanced sub-surface defect detection builds upon the previous model’s successful adoption by HBM customers for die position metrology on stacked dies and wafers,” says Brooks.

According to TechInsights, the market for inspection products supporting wafer level packaging (WLP) is forecast to grow from $400 million in 2024 to more than $600 million by 2028. The advanced node portion of this market supporting new HBM technologies as well as advanced GPUs used in artificial intelligence (AI) applications is currently outgrowing the overall market with an annual growth rate of >19%.

For more information about the high speed IR capability on the Dragonfly G3 system, contact us or reach out to your local sales team.

About Onto Innovation Inc.

Onto Innovation is a leader in process control, combining global scale with an expanded portfolio of leading-edge technologies that include: Un-patterned wafer quality; 3D metrology spanning chip features from nanometer scale transistors to large die interconnects; macro defect inspection of wafers and packages; metal interconnect composition; factory analytics; and lithography for advanced semiconductor packaging. Our breadth of offerings across the entire semiconductor value chain combined with our connected thinking approach results in a unique perspective to help solve our customers’ most difficult yield, device performance, quality, and reliability issues. Onto Innovation strives to optimize customers’ critical path of progress by making them smarter, faster and more efficient. With headquarters and manufacturing in the U.S., Onto Innovation supports customers with a worldwide sales and service organization. Additional information can be found at www.ontoinnovation.com.

Forward Looking Statements

This press release contains forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995 (the “Act”) which include statements relating to Onto Innovation’s business momentum and future growth; the benefit to customers and the capabilities of Onto Innovation’s products and customer service; Onto Innovation’s ability to both deliver products and services consistent with our customers’ demands and expectations and strengthen its market position, Onto Innovation’s beliefs about market opportunities as well as other matters that are not purely historical data. Onto Innovation wishes to take advantage of the “safe harbor” provided for by the Act and cautions that actual results may differ materially from those projected as a result of various factors, including risks and uncertainties, many of which are beyond Onto Innovation’s control. Such factors include, but are not limited to, the Company’s ability to leverage its resources to improve its position in its core markets; its ability to weather difficult economic environments; its ability to open new market opportunities and target high-margin markets; the strength/weakness of the back-end and/or front-end semiconductor market segments; fluctuations in customer capital spending; the Company’s ability to effectively manage its supply chain and adequately source components from suppliers to meet customer demand; the effects of political, economic, legal, and regulatory changes or conflicts on the Company's global operations; its ability to adequately protect its intellectual property rights and maintain data security; the effects of natural disasters or public health emergencies, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, on the global economy and on the Company’s customers, suppliers, employees, and business; its ability to effectively maneuver global trade issues and changes in trade and export regulations and license policies; the Company’s ability to maintain relationships with its customers and manage appropriate levels of inventory to meet customer demands; and the Company’s ability to successfully integrate acquired businesses and technologies. Additional information and considerations regarding the risks faced by Onto Innovation are available in Onto Innovation’s Form 10-K report for the year ended December 30, 2023, and other filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission. As the forward-looking statements are based on Onto Innovation’s current expectations, the Company cannot guarantee any related future results, levels of activity, performance or achievements. Onto Innovation does not assume any obligation to update the forward-looking information contained in this press release, except as required by law.

Source: Onto Innovation Inc.

ONTO-IP

Onto Innovation's Dragonfly G3 sub-micron 2D/3D inspection and metrology system now offers the capability to detect sub-surface defects using a novel infra-red (IR) technology and specially designed algorithms. (Photo: Business Wire)

Onto Innovation's Dragonfly G3 sub-micron 2D/3D inspection and metrology system now offers the capability to detect sub-surface defects using a novel infra-red (IR) technology and specially designed algorithms. (Photo: Business Wire)

NEW YORK (AP) — In the last two years, bird flu has been blamed for the deaths of millions of wild and domestic birds worldwide. It's killed legions of seals and sea lions, wiped out mink farms, and dispatched cats, dogs, skunks, foxes and even a polar bear.

But it seems to have hardly touched people.

That's "a little bit of a head scratcher,” although there are some likely explanations, said Richard Webby, a flu researcher at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital in Memphis. It could have to do with how infection occurs or because species have differences in the microscopic docking points that flu viruses need to take root and multiply in cells, experts say.

But what keeps scientists awake at night is whether that situation will change.

“There's a lot we don't understand,” said Dr. Tom Frieden, a former CDC director who currently heads Resolve to Save Lives, a not-for-profit that works to prevent epidemics. “I think we have to get over the 'hope for the best and bury our head in the sand' approach. Because it could be really bad."

Some researchers theorize that flu viruses that originated in birds were the precursors to terrible scourges in humans, including pandemics in 1918 and 1957. Those viruses became deadly human contagions and spread in animals and people.

A number of experts think it’s unlikely this virus will become a deadly global contagion, based on current evidence. But that's not a sure bet.

Just in case, U.S. health officials are readying vaccines and making other preparations. But they are holding off on bolder steps because the virus isn't causing severe disease in people and they have no strong evidence it’s spreading from person to person.

The flu that's currently spreading — known as H5N1 — was first identified in birds in 1959. It didn’t really began to worry health officials until a Hong Kong outbreak in 1997 that involved severe human illnesses and deaths.

It has caused hundreds of deaths around the world, the vast majority of them involving direct contact between people and infected birds. When there was apparent spread between people, it involved very close and extended contact within households.

Like other viruses, however, the H5N1 virus has mutated over time. In the last few years, one particular strain has spread alarmingly quickly and widely.

In the United States, animal outbreaks have been reported at dozens of dairy cow farms and more than 1,000 poultry flocks, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Four human infections have been reported among the hundreds of thousands of people who work at U.S. poultry and dairy farms, though that may be an undercount.

Worldwide, doctors have detected 15 human infections caused by the widely circulating bird flu strain. The count includes one death — a 38-year-old woman in southern China in 2022 — but most people had either no symptoms or only mild ones, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

There's no way to know how many animals have been infected, but certain creatures seem to be getting more severe illnesses.

Take cats, for example. Flu is commonly thought of as a disease of the lungs, but the virus can attack and multiply in other parts of the body too. In cats, scientists have found the virus attacking the brain, damaging and clotting blood vessels and causing seizures and death.

Similarly gruesome deaths have been reported in other animals, including foxes that ate dead, infected birds.

The flu strain's ability to lodge in the brain and nervous system is one possible reason for "higher mortality rate in some species,” said Amy Baker, an Iowa-based U.S. Department of Agriculture scientist who studies bird flu in animals. But scientists "just don’t know what the properties of the virus or the properties of the host are that are leading to these differences,” Baker said.

Unlike cats, cows have been largely spared. Illnesses have been reported in less than 10% of the cows in affected dairy herds, according to the USDA. Those that did develop symptoms experienced fever, lethargy, decreased appetite and increased respiratory secretions.

Cow infections largely have been concentrated in the udders of lactating animals. Researchers investigating cat deaths at dairy farms with infected cows concluded the felines caught the virus from drinking raw milk.

Researchers are still sorting out how the virus has been spreading from cow to cow, but studies suggest the main route of exposure is not the kind of airborne droplets associated with coughing and sneezing. Instead it's thought to be direct contact, perhaps through shared milking equipment or spread by the workers who milk them.

Then there's the issue of susceptibility. Flu virus need to be able to latch onto cells before they can invade them.

“If it doesn't get into a cell, nothing happens. ... The virus just swims around,” explained Juergen Richt, a researcher at Kansas State University.

But those docking spots — sialic acid receptors — aren't found uniformly throughout the body, and differ among species. One recent study documented the presence of bird flu-friendly receptors in dairy cattle mammary glands.

Eye redness has been a common symptom among people infected by the current bird flu strain. People who milk cows are eye level with the udders, and splashes are common. Some scientists also note that the human eye has receptors that the virus can bind to.

A study published this month found ferrets infected in the eyes ended up dying, as the researchers demonstrated that the virus could be as deadly entering through the eyes as through the respiratory tract.

Why didn't the same happen in the U.S. farmworkers?

That's a hard one to answer, experts said. Perhaps people have some level of immunity, due to past exposure to other forms of flu or to vaccinations, Richt suggested.

A more menacing question: What happens if the virus mutates in a way that makes it more lethal to people or allows it to spread more easily?

Pigs are a concern because they are considered ideal mixing vessels for bird flu to potentially combine with other flu viruses to create something more dangerous. Baker has been studying the current strain in pigs and found it can replicate in the lungs, but the disease is very mild.

But that could all change, which is why there's a push in the scientific community to ramp up animal testing.

Frieden, of Resolve to Save Lives, noted public health experts have been worried about a deadly new flu pandemic for a long time.

“The only thing predictable about influenza is it's unpredictable,” he said.

The Associated Press Health and Science Department receives support from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Science and Educational Media Group. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

FILE - A dead sea bird lays beside a dead sea lion on the beach at Punta Bermeja, on the Atlantic coast of the Patagonian province of Río Negro, near Viedma, Argentina, Monday, Aug. 28, 2023. Government experts suspect that bird flu is killing sea lions along Argentina's entire Atlantic coastline, causing authorities to close many beaches in order to prevent the virus from spreading further. (AP Photo/Juan Macri, File)

FILE - A dead sea bird lays beside a dead sea lion on the beach at Punta Bermeja, on the Atlantic coast of the Patagonian province of Río Negro, near Viedma, Argentina, Monday, Aug. 28, 2023. Government experts suspect that bird flu is killing sea lions along Argentina's entire Atlantic coastline, causing authorities to close many beaches in order to prevent the virus from spreading further. (AP Photo/Juan Macri, File)

Recommended Articles