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 Zep® Introduces Pro Wash N Wick Innovative Vehicle Wash

News

 Zep® Introduces Pro Wash N Wick Innovative Vehicle Wash
News

News

 Zep® Introduces Pro Wash N Wick Innovative Vehicle Wash

2024-04-23 20:11 Last Updated At:20:20

ATLANTA--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Apr 23, 2024--

Zep ® , the go-to cleaning brand for professionals, announces the launch of Pro Wash N Wick, a superior vehicle wash engineered for excellence. The premium-grade solution introduces a breakthrough in vehicle washing technology, that combines unparalleled cleaning with fast sheeting to create an exceptionally quick drying and spot-free shine.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20240423531123/en/

Pro Wash N Wick is distinguished by its high-foaming formula, which effortlessly cuts through road film, diesel exhaust and bugs. The product's proprietary non-silicone formula sheets water from the surface, eliminating the need for manual drying while creating a spotless, clean finish. The formula can be used with or without agitation and in hot or cold water to create a perfect shine. Additionally, Pro Wash N Wick is safe on polished aluminum, making it a versatile solution that extends to a wide range of commercial vehicles, including buses, trains, and light to heavy-duty trucks. Its specialized formula saves time and cost by streamlining the cleaning process and inventory needs. This technology is only available with Zep, revolutionizing the way vehicles are washed.

“Pro Wash N Wick represents Zep's commitment to innovation and our understanding of the needs within the vehicle wash industry,” said Lauren Houser, Zep Vice President of Marketing. “This product is designed to make vehicle washing more efficient and effective for businesses, providing a comprehensive cleaning solution that enhances appearance and maintains the condition of fleets over time. It underscores our dedication to delivering high-quality, efficient products, keeping fleets cleaner for longer, and saving businesses significant time, energy, and resources.”

Ideal for commercial fleets, Pro Wash N Wick promises a high-gloss, spot-free finish with minimal effort. Its high foaming action tackles the toughest soils, making it suitable for various washing methods, including drive-through, touchless, and manual washing. The product is designed for use in high-pressure sprayer applications such as pressure washers, truck wash facilities, foaming equipment, and drive-through friction or touchless gantry systems, ensuring versatility and ease of use in commercial washing scenarios. Non-corrosive, Pro Wash N Wick does not erode concrete or harm washing equipment.

As businesses seek more efficient, effective, and sustainable washing solutions for their vehicles, Pro Wash N Wick by Zep stands out as a top choice, reaffirming Zep's role as a leader in cleaning technologies and product offerings.

For more information on Pro Wash N Wick and to explore the full range of products and purchasing options, please call Zep at (877) 428-9937 and press #3 for Inside Sales.

About Zep, Inc.

Zep, Inc. is a leading innovator, producer, and distributor of maintenance, cleaning, and sanitation solutions for food and beverage, industrial and institutional, retail, and vehicle care customers. Zep possesses a large portfolio of premium brands built over an 85-year legacy of developing the most effective products trusted by professionals and consumers to get the job done right the first time.

Zep Pro Wash N Wick is a premium-grade solution that introduces a breakthrough in vehicle washing technology, combining unparalleled cleaning with fast sheeting to create an exceptionally quick drying and spot-free shine. (Photo: Business Wire)

Zep Pro Wash N Wick is a premium-grade solution that introduces a breakthrough in vehicle washing technology, combining unparalleled cleaning with fast sheeting to create an exceptionally quick drying and spot-free shine. (Photo: Business Wire)

DENVER (AP) — Colorado Gov. Jared Polis signed two bills into law Friday that overhaul state oversight of the funeral home industry after a series of gruesome discoveries, including 190 discomposing bodies in a facility, families being sent fake ashes and the unauthorized sale of body parts.

The cases put Colorado's lax funeral home regulations — some of the weakest in the nation — in the spotlight and rocked hundreds of already grieving families.

Some families had ceremonially spread ashes that turned out to be fake. Others said they had nightmares about what their loved ones might have looked like in a decayed state.

“When grieving the loss of a loved one, the last thing a family should worry about is the trustworthiness and professionalism of those entrusted to care for the person who has passed," Polis said in a statement.

The new laws bring Colorado in line with most other states.

One requires regulators to routinely inspect funeral homes and give them more enforcement power. Another implements licensing for funeral directors and other workers in the industry. They would need to pass background checks and a national exam while possessing degrees and work experience.

Previously, funeral home directors in Colorado didn't have to graduate from high school, let alone have a degree.

The funeral home industry was generally on board with the changes though some expressed concern that strict requirements for funeral home directors were unnecessary and would make it difficult to find hirable applicants.

The bill signings follow a rocky year for Colorado funeral homes.

In early October, neighbors noticed a putrid smell coming from a building in the town of Penrose about two hours south of Denver. Authorities soon found 190 decaying bodies there including adults, infants and fetuses.

Some were stacked atop each other. Decomposition fluid covered the floors while flies and maggots swarmed.

Almost two dozen bodies dated to 2019 and some 60 more were from 2020. As the bodies were identified, families who had received ashes learned the cremains weren't their loved ones.

In most states, funeral homes are routinely inspected but no such rules were on the books in Colorado. The owners of the funeral home were arrested in November and collectively face hundreds of charges of abusing corpses and other counts.

Just months later, in February, a woman's body was found in the back of hearse where a suburban Denver funeral home had left it for over a year. At least 30 sets of cremated remains were found stashed throughout the funeral director's home.

Bedayn is a corps member for the Associated Press/Report for America Statehouse News Initiative. Report for America is a nonprofit national service program that places journalists in local newsrooms to report on undercovered issues.

Mead Gruver in Cheyenne, Wyoming, contributed to this report.

FILE - Colorado Governor Jared Polis delivers the 2024 State of the State address to a joint session of the legislature in the House of Representatives in the State Capitol, Thursday, Jan. 11, 2024, in Denver. Polis is set to sign two bills Friday, May 24, that overhaul the state's oversight of the funeral home industry after a series of gruesome discoveries, including 190 discomposing bodies in a facility, families being sent fake ashes and the unauthorized sale of body parts.(Hyoung Chang/The Denver Post via AP, File)

FILE - Colorado Governor Jared Polis delivers the 2024 State of the State address to a joint session of the legislature in the House of Representatives in the State Capitol, Thursday, Jan. 11, 2024, in Denver. Polis is set to sign two bills Friday, May 24, that overhaul the state's oversight of the funeral home industry after a series of gruesome discoveries, including 190 discomposing bodies in a facility, families being sent fake ashes and the unauthorized sale of body parts.(Hyoung Chang/The Denver Post via AP, File)

FILE - Fremont County coroner Randy Keller, left, and other authorities unload materials that will be used to put up tents at the Return to Nature Funeral Home where over 100 bodies have been improperly stored, Saturday, Oct. 7, 2023, in Penrose, Colo. Colorado Gov. Jared Polis is set to sign two bills Friday, May 24, 2024, that overhaul the state's oversight of the funeral home industry after a series of gruesome discoveries, including 190 discomposing bodies in a facility, families being sent fake ashes and the unauthorized sale of body parts.(Parker Seibold/The Gazette via AP, File)

FILE - Fremont County coroner Randy Keller, left, and other authorities unload materials that will be used to put up tents at the Return to Nature Funeral Home where over 100 bodies have been improperly stored, Saturday, Oct. 7, 2023, in Penrose, Colo. Colorado Gov. Jared Polis is set to sign two bills Friday, May 24, 2024, that overhaul the state's oversight of the funeral home industry after a series of gruesome discoveries, including 190 discomposing bodies in a facility, families being sent fake ashes and the unauthorized sale of body parts.(Parker Seibold/The Gazette via AP, File)

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