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Trump suggests Chinese migrants are in the US to build an 'army.' The migrants tell another story

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Trump suggests Chinese migrants are in the US to build an 'army.' The migrants tell another story
News

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Trump suggests Chinese migrants are in the US to build an 'army.' The migrants tell another story

2024-05-13 12:17 Last Updated At:12:31

NEW YORK (AP) — It was 7 a.m. on a recent Friday when Wang Gang, a 36-year-old Chinese immigrant, jostled for a day job in New York City’s Flushing neighborhood.

When a potential employer pulled up near the street corner, Wang and dozens of other men swarmed around the car. They were hoping to be picked for work on a construction site, at a farm, as a mover — anything that would pay.

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Wang Gang, 36, front, a Chinese immigrant, talks with the driver of a car with others as they try to get a daily paid job working construction or in another trade in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York on May 3, 2024. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in Flushing is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Fu Ting)

NEW YORK (AP) — It was 7 a.m. on a recent Friday when Wang Gang, a 36-year-old Chinese immigrant, jostled for a day job in New York City’s Flushing neighborhood.

A notebook and Commercial Driving License study notes belonging to Chinese migrant Li Kai, aka Khaled, an ethnic Hui Muslim, are seen in his apartment in Flushing, New York, Friday, May 3, 2024. Li Kai came to the U.S. with his wife and two sons seeking religious freedom and a better life. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

A notebook and Commercial Driving License study notes belonging to Chinese migrant Li Kai, aka Khaled, an ethnic Hui Muslim, are seen in his apartment in Flushing, New York, Friday, May 3, 2024. Li Kai came to the U.S. with his wife and two sons seeking religious freedom and a better life. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

Chinese migrant Li Kai aka Khaled, an ethnic Hui Muslim, studies for a U.S. Commercial Driving License in his apartment in Flushing, New York, Friday, May 3, 2024. Li Kai came to the United States with his wife and two sons seeking religious freedom and a better life. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

Chinese migrant Li Kai aka Khaled, an ethnic Hui Muslim, studies for a U.S. Commercial Driving License in his apartment in Flushing, New York, Friday, May 3, 2024. Li Kai came to the United States with his wife and two sons seeking religious freedom and a better life. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

Chen Wang, a Chinese migrant currently homeless in New York, poses for a photo in front of his tent on Friday, May 3, 2024. Chen came to the U.S. after getting criminally admonished by Chinese police for anti-Chinese Communist Party posts on X, formerly known as Twitter. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

Chen Wang, a Chinese migrant currently homeless in New York, poses for a photo in front of his tent on Friday, May 3, 2024. Chen came to the U.S. after getting criminally admonished by Chinese police for anti-Chinese Communist Party posts on X, formerly known as Twitter. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

A canal that Chen Wang, a Chinese migrant currently homeless in New York, built to redirect water on his camp site is seen on Friday, May 3, 2024. Chen came to the U.S. after getting criminally admonished by Chinese police for anti-Chinese Communist Party posts on X, formerly known as Twitter. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

A canal that Chen Wang, a Chinese migrant currently homeless in New York, built to redirect water on his camp site is seen on Friday, May 3, 2024. Chen came to the U.S. after getting criminally admonished by Chinese police for anti-Chinese Communist Party posts on X, formerly known as Twitter. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

Chen Wang, a Chinese migrant currently homeless in New York, poses for a photo near his tent on Friday, May 3, 2024. Chen came to the U.S. after getting criminally admonished by Chinese police for anti-Chinese Communist Party posts on X, formerly known as Twitter. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

Chen Wang, a Chinese migrant currently homeless in New York, poses for a photo near his tent on Friday, May 3, 2024. Chen came to the U.S. after getting criminally admonished by Chinese police for anti-Chinese Communist Party posts on X, formerly known as Twitter. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

Chen Wang, a Chinese migrant currently homeless in New York, is reflected in a mirror at his camp site, Friday, May 3, 2024. Chen came to the U.S. after getting criminally admonished by Chinese police for anti-Chinese Communist Party posts on X, formerly known as Twitter. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

Chen Wang, a Chinese migrant currently homeless in New York, is reflected in a mirror at his camp site, Friday, May 3, 2024. Chen came to the U.S. after getting criminally admonished by Chinese police for anti-Chinese Communist Party posts on X, formerly known as Twitter. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

Grass that Chen Wang, a Chinese migrant currently homeless in New York, planted around his tent is seen on Friday, May 3, 2024. Chen came to the U.S. after getting criminally admonished by Chinese police for anti-Chinese Communist Party posts on X, formerly known as Twitter. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

Grass that Chen Wang, a Chinese migrant currently homeless in New York, planted around his tent is seen on Friday, May 3, 2024. Chen came to the U.S. after getting criminally admonished by Chinese police for anti-Chinese Communist Party posts on X, formerly known as Twitter. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

Chinese migrant Li Kai aka Khaled, an ethnic Hui Muslim, studies for a Commercial Driving License in his apartment in Flushing, New York, Friday, May 3, 2024. Li Kai came to the U.S. with his wife and two sons seeking religious freedom and a better life. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

Chinese migrant Li Kai aka Khaled, an ethnic Hui Muslim, studies for a Commercial Driving License in his apartment in Flushing, New York, Friday, May 3, 2024. Li Kai came to the U.S. with his wife and two sons seeking religious freedom and a better life. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

Chen Wang, a Chinese migrant currently homeless in New York, poses for a photo in front of his tent on Friday, May 3, 2024. Chen came to the U.S. after getting criminally admonished by Chinese police for anti-Chinese Communist Party posts on X, formerly known as Twitter. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

Chen Wang, a Chinese migrant currently homeless in New York, poses for a photo in front of his tent on Friday, May 3, 2024. Chen came to the U.S. after getting criminally admonished by Chinese police for anti-Chinese Communist Party posts on X, formerly known as Twitter. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

Wang Gang, 36, center left, a Chinese immigrant, talks with the driver of a car with others as they try to get a daily paid job working construction or in another trade in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York on May 3, 2024. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in Flushing is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Fu Ting)

Wang Gang, 36, center left, a Chinese immigrant, talks with the driver of a car with others as they try to get a daily paid job working construction or in another trade in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York on May 3, 2024. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in Flushing is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Fu Ting)

Wang had no luck, even as he waited for two more hours. It would be another day without a job since he crossed the southern U.S. border illegally in February.

The daily struggle of Chinese immigrants in Flushing is a far cry from the picture former President Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint of them as a coordinated group of “military-age” men who have come to the United States to build an “army” and attack America.

Since the start of the year, as the Chinese newcomers adjust to life in the U.S., Trump has alluded to “fighting age” or “military age” Chinese men at least six times and suggested at least twice that they were forming a migrant “army." The talking point also appears in conservative media and on social platforms.

“They’re coming in from China — 31, 32,000 over the last few months — and they’re all military age and they mostly are men,” Trump said during a campaign rally last month. “And it sounds like to me, are they trying to build a little army in our country?"

Asian advocacy organizations say they worry the rhetoric could encourage further harassment and violence toward the Asian community, which saw more hate incidents during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Wang, who traveled several weeks from Wuhan, China, to Ecuador, to the southern U.S. border, said the idea that Chinese migrants were building a military “does not exist” among immigrants he has met.

“We came here to make money," he said.

Immigrants in Flushing said they came to escape poverty and financial losses from China’s strict lockdown during the pandemic, or to escape the threat of imprisonment in a repressive society where they couldn’t speak or exercise their religion freely.

Since late 2022 — when China’s three-year COVID-19 lockdown began to lift — the U.S. has seen a sharp rise in the number of Chinese migrants. In 2023, U.S. authorities arrested more than 37,000 Chinese nationals at the U.S.-Mexico border, more than 10 times the previous year’s number. In December alone, border officials arrested 5,951 Chinese nationals on the southern border, a record monthly high, before the number trended down during the first three months of this year.

Most who have come are single adults, according to federal data. There are more men than women on the perilous route, which typically involves flying to South America and then making the long, arduous trek north to the U.S. border.

One reason men may come alone in higher numbers is the danger, said a 35-year-old Chinese man who only gave his family name of Yin because he was concerned about the safety of his wife and children, who remain in China for now.

“This trip is deadly. People die. The trip isn’t suitable for women — it’s not suitable for anyone,” said Yin.

Immigrants in Flushing said they came to America to escape China, not to fight on its behalf.

Thirty-six-year-old Chen Wang, from southeastern China, said he decided to come to the U.S. in late 2021 after he posted comments critical of the ruling party on Twitter. He was admonished by local police and feared that he could be imprisoned.

More than two years later, he is still unemployed and lives in a tent in the woods that he has made into a home. Chen described his fellow Chinese on the journey as simply people “chasing a better life.”

To be sure, U.S. intelligence leaders have grave concerns about the threat China’s authoritarian government poses to the country. There also have been crimes committed by Chinese immigrants, including the arrest in March of a Chinese national breaching a military base in California, but there has been no evidence that migrants from China are coming to the U.S. to fight Americans.

Deputy Secretary of State Kurt Campbell last month called the Chinese nationals “economic migrants.”

China has said it strongly opposes illegal immigration. Its foreign ministry said Trump’s claims of a Chinese migrant army were “an egregious mismatch of the facts.” The Department of Homeland Security didn’t respond to requests for comment.

Steven Cheung, communications director for the Trump campaign, said letting so many Chinese migrants into the U.S. sets a “dangerous precedent" that nefarious actors could exploit.

“These individuals have not been vetted or screened, and we have no idea who they are affiliated with or what their intention is,” he said in an emailed statement.

Sapna Cheryan, a psychology professor at the University of Washington, said the claims about Chinese migrants — made without evidence — build on pervasive stereotypes that Asian people do not belong in the country.

These ideas have fueled violence against Asian Americans and could embolden people again, she said.

Li Kai, also known as Khaled, a 44-year-old Muslim from a city close to Beijing, said he was worried about Trump’s statements regarding illegal immigration and Muslims, but said he has no choice other than to stay.

He was one of the few who made the trip with his family. He shares a bunk bed and sofa with his wife and two sons in a temporary home in Flushing where he has placed an American flag on the wall.

When his sons are at school, he studies for a commercial driver’s license. He hopes to find a job and start paying taxes.

“Now that I have brought my family here, I want to have a stable life here,” he said. “I would like to pay back.”

Tang reported from Washington.

The Associated Press receives support from several private foundations to enhance its explanatory coverage of elections and democracy. See more about AP’s democracy initiative here. The AP is solely responsible for all content.

Wang Gang, 36, front, a Chinese immigrant, talks with the driver of a car with others as they try to get a daily paid job working construction or in another trade in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York on May 3, 2024. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in Flushing is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Fu Ting)

Wang Gang, 36, front, a Chinese immigrant, talks with the driver of a car with others as they try to get a daily paid job working construction or in another trade in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York on May 3, 2024. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in Flushing is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Fu Ting)

A notebook and Commercial Driving License study notes belonging to Chinese migrant Li Kai, aka Khaled, an ethnic Hui Muslim, are seen in his apartment in Flushing, New York, Friday, May 3, 2024. Li Kai came to the U.S. with his wife and two sons seeking religious freedom and a better life. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

A notebook and Commercial Driving License study notes belonging to Chinese migrant Li Kai, aka Khaled, an ethnic Hui Muslim, are seen in his apartment in Flushing, New York, Friday, May 3, 2024. Li Kai came to the U.S. with his wife and two sons seeking religious freedom and a better life. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

Chinese migrant Li Kai aka Khaled, an ethnic Hui Muslim, studies for a U.S. Commercial Driving License in his apartment in Flushing, New York, Friday, May 3, 2024. Li Kai came to the United States with his wife and two sons seeking religious freedom and a better life. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

Chinese migrant Li Kai aka Khaled, an ethnic Hui Muslim, studies for a U.S. Commercial Driving License in his apartment in Flushing, New York, Friday, May 3, 2024. Li Kai came to the United States with his wife and two sons seeking religious freedom and a better life. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

Chen Wang, a Chinese migrant currently homeless in New York, poses for a photo in front of his tent on Friday, May 3, 2024. Chen came to the U.S. after getting criminally admonished by Chinese police for anti-Chinese Communist Party posts on X, formerly known as Twitter. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

Chen Wang, a Chinese migrant currently homeless in New York, poses for a photo in front of his tent on Friday, May 3, 2024. Chen came to the U.S. after getting criminally admonished by Chinese police for anti-Chinese Communist Party posts on X, formerly known as Twitter. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

A canal that Chen Wang, a Chinese migrant currently homeless in New York, built to redirect water on his camp site is seen on Friday, May 3, 2024. Chen came to the U.S. after getting criminally admonished by Chinese police for anti-Chinese Communist Party posts on X, formerly known as Twitter. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

A canal that Chen Wang, a Chinese migrant currently homeless in New York, built to redirect water on his camp site is seen on Friday, May 3, 2024. Chen came to the U.S. after getting criminally admonished by Chinese police for anti-Chinese Communist Party posts on X, formerly known as Twitter. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

Chen Wang, a Chinese migrant currently homeless in New York, poses for a photo near his tent on Friday, May 3, 2024. Chen came to the U.S. after getting criminally admonished by Chinese police for anti-Chinese Communist Party posts on X, formerly known as Twitter. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

Chen Wang, a Chinese migrant currently homeless in New York, poses for a photo near his tent on Friday, May 3, 2024. Chen came to the U.S. after getting criminally admonished by Chinese police for anti-Chinese Communist Party posts on X, formerly known as Twitter. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

Chen Wang, a Chinese migrant currently homeless in New York, is reflected in a mirror at his camp site, Friday, May 3, 2024. Chen came to the U.S. after getting criminally admonished by Chinese police for anti-Chinese Communist Party posts on X, formerly known as Twitter. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

Chen Wang, a Chinese migrant currently homeless in New York, is reflected in a mirror at his camp site, Friday, May 3, 2024. Chen came to the U.S. after getting criminally admonished by Chinese police for anti-Chinese Communist Party posts on X, formerly known as Twitter. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

Grass that Chen Wang, a Chinese migrant currently homeless in New York, planted around his tent is seen on Friday, May 3, 2024. Chen came to the U.S. after getting criminally admonished by Chinese police for anti-Chinese Communist Party posts on X, formerly known as Twitter. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

Grass that Chen Wang, a Chinese migrant currently homeless in New York, planted around his tent is seen on Friday, May 3, 2024. Chen came to the U.S. after getting criminally admonished by Chinese police for anti-Chinese Communist Party posts on X, formerly known as Twitter. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

Chinese migrant Li Kai aka Khaled, an ethnic Hui Muslim, studies for a Commercial Driving License in his apartment in Flushing, New York, Friday, May 3, 2024. Li Kai came to the U.S. with his wife and two sons seeking religious freedom and a better life. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

Chinese migrant Li Kai aka Khaled, an ethnic Hui Muslim, studies for a Commercial Driving License in his apartment in Flushing, New York, Friday, May 3, 2024. Li Kai came to the U.S. with his wife and two sons seeking religious freedom and a better life. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

Chen Wang, a Chinese migrant currently homeless in New York, poses for a photo in front of his tent on Friday, May 3, 2024. Chen came to the U.S. after getting criminally admonished by Chinese police for anti-Chinese Communist Party posts on X, formerly known as Twitter. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

Chen Wang, a Chinese migrant currently homeless in New York, poses for a photo in front of his tent on Friday, May 3, 2024. Chen came to the U.S. after getting criminally admonished by Chinese police for anti-Chinese Communist Party posts on X, formerly known as Twitter. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in New York is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Serkan Gurbuz)

Wang Gang, 36, center left, a Chinese immigrant, talks with the driver of a car with others as they try to get a daily paid job working construction or in another trade in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York on May 3, 2024. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in Flushing is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Fu Ting)

Wang Gang, 36, center left, a Chinese immigrant, talks with the driver of a car with others as they try to get a daily paid job working construction or in another trade in the Flushing neighborhood of the Queens borough of New York on May 3, 2024. The daily struggle to find work for Chinese immigrants living illegally in Flushing is a far cry from the picture Donald Trump and other Republicans have sought to paint about them. Asian advocacy organizations say they're concerned the exaggerated rhetoric could fuel further harassment against Asians in the U.S. (AP Photo/Fu Ting)

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Reading of the 2024 Emmy nominations begins

2024-07-17 23:37 Last Updated At:23:40

LOS ANGELES (AP) — The reading of the 2024 Emmy Award nominations has begun.

Emmy winners Sheryl Lee Ralph and Tony Hale are announcing the nominees for the best work in television in a live-streamed ceremony available at Emmys.com and on YouTube. (It can also be watched on APNews.com. )

The nominees for best limited or anthology series are: “Baby Reindeer”; “Fargo”; “Lessons in Chemistry”; “Ripley”; “True Detective: Night Country.”

The nominees for outstanding reality competition show are: “The Amazing Race”; “RuPaul’s Drag Race”; “Top Chef”; “The Traitors” and “The Voice.”

The nominees are being announced just six months after the last Emmy Awards, which were delayed by last year’s writers and actors strikes.

Getting back to its traditional schedule, the show will be held Sept. 15 at the Peacock Theater in Los Angeles and air on ABC.

None of last year’s top three nominees — “Succession,” “The White Lotus” and “The Last of Us” — all from HBO, are in the competition. “Succession,” the dominant winner three of the past four years, is finished and the other two are series between seasons.

Taking advantage of the opening could be FX upstart “Shogun” and Netflix Emmy perennial “The Crown.”

“Shogun" shook up the drama race when its makers said in May that despite reaching the end of the story of James Clavell's historical novel about political machinations in early 17th century Japan, they would explore making more than one season. That shifted the critical darling from the limited series category to the more elite drama category, where it immediately became the favorite.

If “Shogun” does dominate, FX could be this year's HBO, with “The Bear" set to clean up in comedy and “Fargo” likely to get plenty of nominations in the limited or anthology series categories.

“The Bear” is eligible for its second season, in which chef and lead Carmen “Carmie” Berzatto, played by Emmy winner Jeremy Allen White, attempts to transform a shoddy sandwich shop into an elite restaurant. The series created by Christopher Storer could easily top the 13 nominations and six wins it got last time around.

For more coverage on this year’s Emmy Awards and recent television shows, visit: https://apnews.com/hub/television

This image released by Netflix shows Elizabeth Debicki as Diana, Princess of Wales, in a scene from "The Crown." (Keith Bernstein/Netflix via AP)

This image released by Netflix shows Elizabeth Debicki as Diana, Princess of Wales, in a scene from "The Crown." (Keith Bernstein/Netflix via AP)

This image released by FX shows Eita Okuno as Saeki Nobutatsu, from left, Anna Sawai as Toda Mariko, Hiromoto Ida as Kiyama Ukon Sadanaga in a scene from "Shogun." (Katie Yu/FX via AP)

This image released by FX shows Eita Okuno as Saeki Nobutatsu, from left, Anna Sawai as Toda Mariko, Hiromoto Ida as Kiyama Ukon Sadanaga in a scene from "Shogun." (Katie Yu/FX via AP)

FILE - Emmy statues appear on stage at the 70th Primetime Emmy nominations announcement in Los Angeles on July 12, 2018. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP, File)

FILE - Emmy statues appear on stage at the 70th Primetime Emmy nominations announcement in Los Angeles on July 12, 2018. (Photo by Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP, File)

This image released by FX shows Jeremy Allen White as Carmen Berzatto, in a scene from "The Bear." (FX via AP)

This image released by FX shows Jeremy Allen White as Carmen Berzatto, in a scene from "The Bear." (FX via AP)

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