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India's parliament has fewer Muslims as strength of Modi's party grows

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India's parliament has fewer Muslims as strength of Modi's party grows
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News

India's parliament has fewer Muslims as strength of Modi's party grows

2024-05-15 19:23 Last Updated At:19:30

MALAPPURAM, India (AP) — Preventing Muslim migrants from gaining citizenship. Revoking the semi-autonomy of the country’s only Muslim-majority region. Building a Hindu temple where a violent mob razed a mosque.

These were political triumphs for Prime Minister Narendra Modi over the past decade, burnishing his reputation as a leader who prioritizes the interests of India's Hindu majority. For India's 200 million Muslims, they highlight their waning political power in the world's largest democracy.

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FILE - A group of Muslims huddle together in the back of a mini truck after violent clashes in the locality in New Delhi, India, on Feb. 26, 2020. Tensions between Hindus and Muslims in India are not new, but they have gotten worse under Prime Minister Narendra Modi. (AP Photo/Rajesh Kumar Singh, File)

MALAPPURAM, India (AP) — Preventing Muslim migrants from gaining citizenship. Revoking the semi-autonomy of the country’s only Muslim-majority region. Building a Hindu temple where a violent mob razed a mosque.

FILE- A Muslim rests in his house after breaking Ramadan fast in Ayodhya, India, on March 28, 2023. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup, File)

FILE- A Muslim rests in his house after breaking Ramadan fast in Ayodhya, India, on March 28, 2023. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup, File)

Supporters of M. Abdul Salam, the only Muslim candidate from India's ruling Bharatiya Janata Party, eat breakfast before resuming campaigning in Malappuram, in Indian southern state of Kerala, on April 24, 2024. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

Supporters of M. Abdul Salam, the only Muslim candidate from India's ruling Bharatiya Janata Party, eat breakfast before resuming campaigning in Malappuram, in Indian southern state of Kerala, on April 24, 2024. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

Muslims check for their names in voters' list as they arrive to vote in Nahal village, Uttar Pradesh state, India, on April 26, 2024. (AP Photo/Altaf Qadri)

Muslims check for their names in voters' list as they arrive to vote in Nahal village, Uttar Pradesh state, India, on April 26, 2024. (AP Photo/Altaf Qadri)

FILE- Muslim students leave Mahatma Gandhi Memorial college after they were denied entry into the campus for wearing the burqa in Udupi, Karnataka state, India, on Feb. 24, 2022. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi, File)

FILE- Muslim students leave Mahatma Gandhi Memorial college after they were denied entry into the campus for wearing the burqa in Udupi, Karnataka state, India, on Feb. 24, 2022. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi, File)

A Muslim passerby stops to listen to the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party's only Muslim candidate during an election campaigns in Malappuram, in Indian southern state of Kerala, on April 24, 2024. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

A Muslim passerby stops to listen to the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party's only Muslim candidate during an election campaigns in Malappuram, in Indian southern state of Kerala, on April 24, 2024. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

M. Abdul Salam, the only Muslim candidate from the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party, campaigns in Malappuram, in the southern Indian state of Kerala, on April 24, 2024. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

M. Abdul Salam, the only Muslim candidate from the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party, campaigns in Malappuram, in the southern Indian state of Kerala, on April 24, 2024. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

M. Abdul Salam, the only Muslim candidate from the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party, campaigns in Malappuram, in the southern Indian state of Kerala, on April 24, 2024. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

M. Abdul Salam, the only Muslim candidate from the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party, campaigns in Malappuram, in the southern Indian state of Kerala, on April 24, 2024. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

A Muslim woman displays the indelible ink mark on her index finger after casting her vote on the outskirts of Samastipur, in the eastern Indian state of Bihar, Monday, May 13, 2024. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

A Muslim woman displays the indelible ink mark on her index finger after casting her vote on the outskirts of Samastipur, in the eastern Indian state of Bihar, Monday, May 13, 2024. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

M. Abdul Salam, second right, the only Muslim candidate from the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party campaigns in Malappuram, in the southern Indian state of Kerala, on April 24, 2024. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

M. Abdul Salam, second right, the only Muslim candidate from the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party campaigns in Malappuram, in the southern Indian state of Kerala, on April 24, 2024. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

Muslims offer prayers at a mosque in New Delhi, India, Thursday, April 11, 2024. Some two hundred million Muslims make up the predominantly Hindu country's largest minority group. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

Muslims offer prayers at a mosque in New Delhi, India, Thursday, April 11, 2024. Some two hundred million Muslims make up the predominantly Hindu country's largest minority group. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

Muslims offer prayers at a mosque in New Delhi, India, Thursday, April 11, 2024. In the mid-1980s, Muslims accounted for 11% of India's population, and had 9% of seats in Parliament; today they are 14% of the population and control about 4.6% of Parliament. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

Muslims offer prayers at a mosque in New Delhi, India, Thursday, April 11, 2024. In the mid-1980s, Muslims accounted for 11% of India's population, and had 9% of seats in Parliament; today they are 14% of the population and control about 4.6% of Parliament. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

Tensions between Hindus and Muslims in India are not new, but they have gotten worse under Modi, whose ruling Bharatiya Janata Party touts a Hindu-nationalist ideology. And with Modi seemingly on the cusp of a third five-year term, the outlook for Muslim politicians — and citizens — is bleak. This year's vote will be decided in June.

It's not just that Modi has ramped up anti-Muslim rhetoric in campaign speeches. Ever since the BJP began its rise as a political force in the mid-1980s, the proportion of Muslim lawmakers in parliament and state legislatures has shrunk.

Muslim representation has fallen in the ruling BJP, and in opposition parties, too.

When Modi assumed power in 2014, the outgoing parliament had 30 Muslim lawmakers — and just one was a member of the BJP. Muslims now hold 25 out of 543 seats, and none belong to the BJP.

India has gone from being a country where Muslims were largely marginalized to one where they are “actively excluded,” said Ali Khan Mahmudabad, a political scientist and historian at New Delhi’s Ashoka University.

“Without representation, you are unable to ask the state for resources and articulate the kind of needs the community has in order to progress, whether its education, jobs, health or basic infrastructure,” Mahmudabad said.

In the mid-1980s, Muslims accounted for 11% of India's population, and had 9% of seats in parliament; today they are 14% of the population and have less than 5% of seats in parliament.

Nine out of 10 members in parliament are Hindus, who make up 80 percent of India’s population of 1.4 billion.

The political representation of Muslims at the state level is only slightly better. India has more than 4,000 lawmakers in state legislatures across 28 states and Muslim lawmakers hold roughly 6% of these seats.

A government report in 2006 found Muslims lagged Hindus, Christians and people from India's lower castes in literacy, income and access to education. They have made some gains since then but are still at a significant disadvantage, according to multiple independent studies.

Under Modi's decade in power, the BJP has enacted or proposed various laws that Muslim leaders consider discriminatory.

— Some states ruled by the BJP passed laws restricting interfaith marriage as a way to address what they claim is the threat posed by Hindu women marrying Muslim men and then converting.

— One state formerly ruled by the BJP banned girls from wearing hijabs in school. (The law was reversed after the BJP lost political control.)

— The BJP is advocating a common legal code that would affect some religious practices, by changing some laws in India's constitution that deal with matters ranging from marriage to divorce and inheritance.

Violence against Muslims is commonplace, and Modi has said little to deter it. Muslims have been lynched by Hindu mobs over allegations of eating beef or smuggling cows, an animal considered holy to Hindus. Their homes and businesses have been bulldozed, and their places of worship set on fire.

At recent campaign rallies, Modi has said Muslims are “infiltrators” and that they “have too many children.” Without evidence, he has accused the BJP's main rival, the Congress party, of planning to redistribute the wealth of Hindus to Muslims.

Many Muslims believe Modi is stoking divisions as a campaign strategy.

“They're keeping the Hindu-Muslim issue hot... so they remain enemies,” said Mehmood Bhai Khatri, a 64-year-old Muslim voter from Modi's home state of Gujarat, a BJP stronghold.

“But who will speak up? If they do, they may be picked up (by police) or a bulldozer will be sent to their homes," said Khatri. "So out of fear, nobody speaks up.”

Not one of India's 28 states has a Muslim as chief minister; the BJP and its allies have chief ministers in 19 states.

In Uttar Pradesh, the country's most populous state and where roughly 16% of residents are Muslim, just 7% of state lawmakers are Muslim.

As the BJP becomes ever more powerful, India's opposition parties have become increasingly reluctant to nominate Muslim candidates for fear of alienating Hindu voters, experts say.

While Hindus overwhelmingly rally around the BJP, Muslims have struggled to form a cohesive political agenda, in part because of how diverse their community is across sects, ethnicity, language, customs, and culture.

“There is no way to unite this very heterogeneous group of people, without making Islam the common denominator,” said Mahmudabad, the political scientist.

But when political parties don't field enough Muslims, issues important to them — from minority rights to hate speech — hardly ever get debated in the parliament, said Muhammad Saad, a cab driver in New Delhi who is Muslim.

“If there are no Muslims in the parliament, who will raise the voice for us?” Saad questioned.

Analysts say the BJP has made some outreach efforts to Muslims, such as seeking their help as volunteers and at the polls. But the party fielded just 13 Muslim candidates combined in the 2014 and 2019 elections, and none were elected.

The BJP denies discriminating against Muslim people.

The party "permits accommodation of all kinds of people, not just the Hindus,” said M Abdul Salam, the only Muslim out of some 430 BJP candidates running for parliament this year. If he wins, he will become the first Muslim member of the BJP since 2014 in India’s lower house of the parliament.

Salam, who is from the Muslim-majority southern city of Malappuram, said Muslim politicians from other parties could gain power by joining the BJP’s alliance in parliament.

But Muslims from other parties are struggling simply to stay in office.

S T Hasan, a Muslim member of parliament from the northern state of Uttar Pradesh, was not chosen by the Samajwadi Party to seek reelection. He was replaced by a Hindu politician, a decision he believes was made to appeal to Hindu voters, who are the majority in the region he represents.

Hasan said political parties, especially those that consider themselves secular, need to make more room for minority candidates.

“Fair representation of every community is good for a democracy," he said. “But what we are seeing is that one community is being gradually pushed to the corner.”

Pathi reported from New Delhi and Ahmedabad.

Follow AP's Asia-Pacific coverage at https://apnews.com/hub/asia-pacific

FILE - A group of Muslims huddle together in the back of a mini truck after violent clashes in the locality in New Delhi, India, on Feb. 26, 2020. Tensions between Hindus and Muslims in India are not new, but they have gotten worse under Prime Minister Narendra Modi. (AP Photo/Rajesh Kumar Singh, File)

FILE - A group of Muslims huddle together in the back of a mini truck after violent clashes in the locality in New Delhi, India, on Feb. 26, 2020. Tensions between Hindus and Muslims in India are not new, but they have gotten worse under Prime Minister Narendra Modi. (AP Photo/Rajesh Kumar Singh, File)

FILE- A Muslim rests in his house after breaking Ramadan fast in Ayodhya, India, on March 28, 2023. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup, File)

FILE- A Muslim rests in his house after breaking Ramadan fast in Ayodhya, India, on March 28, 2023. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup, File)

Supporters of M. Abdul Salam, the only Muslim candidate from India's ruling Bharatiya Janata Party, eat breakfast before resuming campaigning in Malappuram, in Indian southern state of Kerala, on April 24, 2024. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

Supporters of M. Abdul Salam, the only Muslim candidate from India's ruling Bharatiya Janata Party, eat breakfast before resuming campaigning in Malappuram, in Indian southern state of Kerala, on April 24, 2024. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

Muslims check for their names in voters' list as they arrive to vote in Nahal village, Uttar Pradesh state, India, on April 26, 2024. (AP Photo/Altaf Qadri)

Muslims check for their names in voters' list as they arrive to vote in Nahal village, Uttar Pradesh state, India, on April 26, 2024. (AP Photo/Altaf Qadri)

FILE- Muslim students leave Mahatma Gandhi Memorial college after they were denied entry into the campus for wearing the burqa in Udupi, Karnataka state, India, on Feb. 24, 2022. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi, File)

FILE- Muslim students leave Mahatma Gandhi Memorial college after they were denied entry into the campus for wearing the burqa in Udupi, Karnataka state, India, on Feb. 24, 2022. (AP Photo/Aijaz Rahi, File)

A Muslim passerby stops to listen to the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party's only Muslim candidate during an election campaigns in Malappuram, in Indian southern state of Kerala, on April 24, 2024. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

A Muslim passerby stops to listen to the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party's only Muslim candidate during an election campaigns in Malappuram, in Indian southern state of Kerala, on April 24, 2024. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

M. Abdul Salam, the only Muslim candidate from the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party, campaigns in Malappuram, in the southern Indian state of Kerala, on April 24, 2024. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

M. Abdul Salam, the only Muslim candidate from the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party, campaigns in Malappuram, in the southern Indian state of Kerala, on April 24, 2024. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

M. Abdul Salam, the only Muslim candidate from the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party, campaigns in Malappuram, in the southern Indian state of Kerala, on April 24, 2024. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

M. Abdul Salam, the only Muslim candidate from the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party, campaigns in Malappuram, in the southern Indian state of Kerala, on April 24, 2024. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

A Muslim woman displays the indelible ink mark on her index finger after casting her vote on the outskirts of Samastipur, in the eastern Indian state of Bihar, Monday, May 13, 2024. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

A Muslim woman displays the indelible ink mark on her index finger after casting her vote on the outskirts of Samastipur, in the eastern Indian state of Bihar, Monday, May 13, 2024. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

M. Abdul Salam, second right, the only Muslim candidate from the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party campaigns in Malappuram, in the southern Indian state of Kerala, on April 24, 2024. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

M. Abdul Salam, second right, the only Muslim candidate from the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party campaigns in Malappuram, in the southern Indian state of Kerala, on April 24, 2024. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

Muslims offer prayers at a mosque in New Delhi, India, Thursday, April 11, 2024. Some two hundred million Muslims make up the predominantly Hindu country's largest minority group. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

Muslims offer prayers at a mosque in New Delhi, India, Thursday, April 11, 2024. Some two hundred million Muslims make up the predominantly Hindu country's largest minority group. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

Muslims offer prayers at a mosque in New Delhi, India, Thursday, April 11, 2024. In the mid-1980s, Muslims accounted for 11% of India's population, and had 9% of seats in Parliament; today they are 14% of the population and control about 4.6% of Parliament. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

Muslims offer prayers at a mosque in New Delhi, India, Thursday, April 11, 2024. In the mid-1980s, Muslims accounted for 11% of India's population, and had 9% of seats in Parliament; today they are 14% of the population and control about 4.6% of Parliament. (AP Photo/Manish Swarup)

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Chanel goes to the opera in a gleaming but designer-less couture collection

2024-06-26 05:57 Last Updated At:06:00

PARIS (AP) — The show must go on, with aplomb. Chanel’s latest couture display Tuesday was a finely executed collection channeling theatricality.

Few Parisian fashion houses can fill the Paris Opera and gain applause from Vogue Editor-in-Chief Anna Wintour and other luminaries without even having a designer. It's a testament to Chanel’s enduring power and its world-renowned atelier following Virginie Viard's abrupt exit on June 5.

Here are some highlights of the fall couture displays:

Guests clutching Chanel opera glasses got happily lost as they explored marble staircases to find a stage in the Opera’s outer corridors, filled with red velvet opera boxes designed by French movie director Christophe Honoré. The stage was set with silhouettes evoking the opera and its heyday: dramatic capes, puffed sleeves and richly embroidered pieces.

The designs’ gleam rivaled only that of the sumptuous 19th-century atrium itself, with shimmering buttons and brilliant threads reflecting the light.

There were moments of drama, with guests reaching for their cameras (being too close for the opera glasses) to capture a black gown with puff sleeves whose feathers, beading and ribbons gleamed provocatively.

This season, there was a welcome move to less accessorizing, a departure from the hallmark of former designer Viard. The focus was on the garments themselves, highlighting the intricate craftsmanship and luxurious materials. Feathers, tassels, embroidered flowers, precious braids, lacquered jersey, supple tweeds, silky velvet, illusion tulle, taffeta, and duchesse satin adorned myriad looks befitting the venue.

Although the necklines were a standout feature—scooped or raised mini-turtle necks—alongside banded, accented shoulders or busts, the collection as a whole had a slightly disparate feel that sometimes seemed to lack a singular aesthetic anchor.

Chanel paid tribute to the ateliers of the “petites mains," or the dozens of artisans who work in six ateliers a stone’s throw from the venue.

For a house that prides itself on perfect image execution, the news that arrived in the middle of the night felt less than polished. Chanel faced its first major event Tuesday without its creative director, who abruptly left after over 30 years with the brand. The announcement was highly unorthodox, just weeks before the couture show.

Later, it emerged that the French couturier would be absent even from her final couture display, with her team stepping in to take charge.

Viard succeeded Karl Lagerfeld upon his death in 2019 and was his closest collaborator for decades. She had overseen record sales for Chanel, reaching a reported $19.7 billion last year. Ready-to-wear sales reportedly increased 23 percent during her tenure.

Yet in the fickle world of fashion, strong sales are not always enough. Viard’s tenure was dogged by controversy, most recently with criticism of her collections, including a poorly received mid-season show in Marseille. Viard faced backlash for runway shows that critics said lacked the grandiose flair defining Lagerfeld’s era, and she often received critiques for underwhelming design choices.

Though her appointment was initially seen as temporary, she was only the third creative director in Chanel’s over 100-year history after Lagerfeld and, of course, legendary founder Gabrielle “Coco” Chanel.

The fashion world speculates on her successor. Names like Hedi Slimane, Marine Serre and Simon Porte Jacquemus circulate, suggesting potential shifts in Chanel’s creative direction.

To nostalgic jazz music, 89-year-old fashion veteran Giorgio Armani returned to his touchstones of the Art Deco period — the 1920s and ’30s — and romance for a slow-burning and brightly gleaming couture display at the Palais de Tokyo. It was called “Pearls.”

Models donned berets in a show that glowed not only with pearls but also with velvets, silk chiffons and tulle, and ended in froths of sparkle. The meticulous craftsmanship, with embellishments like sequins, crystals and rhinestone embroideries, gave Armani's pieces a luminous, ethereal quality for fall that dazzled the eye as it was showcased by slow-walking models. On occasion, Armani was victim to his romantic spirit when he veered into the literal, such as one diamond-encrusted beret.

But tailoring — a design cornerstone for Armani, who cut his cloth in menswear — was a powerful theme in the show. A black angular jacket captured the collection theme perfectly, with its curved, graphic-lined lapel gleaming with myriad pearls adorning the shoulders.

Armani is often linked to the word “timeless” and praised for his ability to create pieces that remain stylish and relevant across decades. This strength reassures the audience, but while always beautiful, the pieces on display Tuesday sometimes lacked the surprise seen in other couture shows this season.

What remains relevant is the Italian runway icon’s enduring influence on the fashion and entertainment industries, as seen by the swath of top editors and stars such as Cate Blanchett, Jodie Turner-Smith, Naomie Harris and Eva Green, who lined the front row. So iconic, in fact, th at there was a new adjective for him revealed in the show notes — “Armanian.”

Bubbles are never far away from the effervescent couturier Alexis Mabille. Guests sipped champagne, with champagne-filled ice buckets even on the runway in a celebration of luxurious excess.

Unfurling, undressing, and plays on corsetry were on the drinks menu this season, starting with an opening number featuring a gleaming bustier that resembled an opening flower. The intimacy and ritual of getting dressed is a theme that pervades Mabille's work.

Varied looks sometimes surprised guests, such as a Bob Mackie-style feathered headdress that out-Cher-ed Cher. The extravagant piece had an almost equestrian flourish and was a real feat of couture execution, showcasing Mabille’s flair for Hollywood-inspired glamour.

A golden bullet creation, and a gleaming metallic power cape with an armor-like bustier, gave the collection a lot of attitude, if not always coherence. Mabille’s collections often embrace a wide array of silhouettes and themes, sometimes leading to a lack of unified narrative. However, the diversity is also part of his charm.

Charles de Vilmorin, the 27-year-old wunderkind of the Parisian couture scene, has once again proven his mettle with a spellbinding show that merged experimental silhouettes, dark musings, and eye-catching color palettes. Known for his vibrant use of color, de Vilmorin’s palette often evokes the sumptuousness of Christian Lacroix’s 1980s work, making him one of the most buzzed-about couturiers in Paris today.

On Tuesday, the audience was transported to a gothic dreamscape where Anna Cleveland emerged as a bewitching figure, trapped in a black straight-jacket gown that screamed both asylum and Tim Burton. De Vilmorin, known for grappling with the pressures of creation and the lofty expectations of the fashion world, channeled these tensions into his collection.

Another ‘straight-jacket’ gown appeared adorned with massive black and red plumes, like a satanic phoenix rising from the ashes. The storytelling that followed was nothing short of a sartorial saga. A gigantic rat scurried down the runway, followed by a model donning an oversized witch’s hat with a fringe of hair.

Adding to the darkly whimsical narrative was a nobleman figure, clad in a crisply wrinkled white bow shirt tied with whimsical flair. This juxtaposition of elegance and dishevelment was pure De Vilmorin. The show’s crescendo was a color-blocked blue and red chiffon Renaissance gown, a nod to historical opulence with a contemporary twist.

A model wears a creation for the Chanel Haute Couture Fall-Winter 2024-2025 collection presented Tuesday, June 25, 2024 in Paris. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

A model wears a creation for the Chanel Haute Couture Fall-Winter 2024-2025 collection presented Tuesday, June 25, 2024 in Paris. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

A model wears a creation for the Chanel Haute Couture Fall-Winter 2024-2025 collection presented Tuesday, June 25, 2024 in Paris. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

A model wears a creation for the Chanel Haute Couture Fall-Winter 2024-2025 collection presented Tuesday, June 25, 2024 in Paris. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

A model wears a creation for the Chanel Haute Couture Fall-Winter 2024-2025 collection presented Tuesday, June 25, 2024 in Paris. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

A model wears a creation for the Chanel Haute Couture Fall-Winter 2024-2025 collection presented Tuesday, June 25, 2024 in Paris. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

A model wears a creation for the Chanel Haute Couture Fall-Winter 2024-2025 collection presented Tuesday, June 25, 2024 in Paris. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

A model wears a creation for the Chanel Haute Couture Fall-Winter 2024-2025 collection presented Tuesday, June 25, 2024 in Paris. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

Models prepare backstage at the Thom Browne Haute Couture Fall-Winter 2024-2025 collection presented Monday, June 24, 2024 in Paris. (Photo by Vianney Le Caer/Invision/AP)

Models prepare backstage at the Thom Browne Haute Couture Fall-Winter 2024-2025 collection presented Monday, June 24, 2024 in Paris. (Photo by Vianney Le Caer/Invision/AP)

A model wears a creation for the Chanel Haute Couture Fall-Winter 2024-2025 collection presented Tuesday, June 25, 2024 in Paris. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

A model wears a creation for the Chanel Haute Couture Fall-Winter 2024-2025 collection presented Tuesday, June 25, 2024 in Paris. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

Models prepare backstage at the Thom Browne Haute Couture Fall-Winter 2024-2025 collection presented Monday, June 24, 2024 in Paris. (Photo by Vianney Le Caer/Invision/AP)

Models prepare backstage at the Thom Browne Haute Couture Fall-Winter 2024-2025 collection presented Monday, June 24, 2024 in Paris. (Photo by Vianney Le Caer/Invision/AP)

A model wears a creation for the Chanel Haute Couture Fall-Winter 2024-2025 collection presented Tuesday, June 25, 2024 in Paris. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

A model wears a creation for the Chanel Haute Couture Fall-Winter 2024-2025 collection presented Tuesday, June 25, 2024 in Paris. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

Models wear creations for the Chanel Haute Couture Fall-Winter 2024-2025 collection presented Tuesday, June 25, 2024 in Paris. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

Models wear creations for the Chanel Haute Couture Fall-Winter 2024-2025 collection presented Tuesday, June 25, 2024 in Paris. (AP Photo/Christophe Ena)

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