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Annual gas operating volume of China's 1st salt cavern storage hits 1 billion cubic meters

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Annual gas operating volume of China's 1st salt cavern storage hits 1 billion cubic meters
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Annual gas operating volume of China's 1st salt cavern storage hits 1 billion cubic meters

2024-05-16 20:58 Last Updated At:21:07

The annual operating capacity for China's first salt cavern compressed air energy storage reached 1.054 billion cubic meters, data released by the China Oil and Gas Pipeline Network Corporation (PipeChina) showed on Thursday.

After a new injection-production gas well entered operation in recent days, the daily gas production capacity of the Jintan gas storage plant came to a record high of 27 million cubic meters.

"As an important supporting facility of the natural gas pipeline network in the Yangtze River Delta region, our Jintan storage has built and put into operation a total of 40 gas injection-production wells, and has carried out 72 cycles of injection and production, with a gas production volume of nearly 5.7 billion cubic meters, equivalent to replacing 7.5 million tons of standard coal and reducing carbon dioxide emissions by over 8 million tons. In other words, the storage has made active contribution to reaching China's targets for carbon peaking and neutrality by optimizing the energy structure in the Yangtze River Delta region," said Yu Guoping, deputy manager of the Jiangsu branch of PipeChina's energy storage technology company.

The salt cavern compressed air energy storage, located in Changzhou City of east China's Jiangsu Province, started operation in May 2023, marking significant progress in the research and application of China's new energy storage technology.

Annual gas operating volume of China's 1st salt cavern storage hits 1 billion cubic meters

Annual gas operating volume of China's 1st salt cavern storage hits 1 billion cubic meters

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Yemen's children struggle for education amid decade-long conflict

2024-06-20 21:57 Last Updated At:22:07

June 20 marks World Refugee Day, shedding light on Yemen's children who have endured nearly a decade-long conflict that has uprooted millions, depriving them of homes and educational opportunities.

In the southwestern province of Taiz, 11-year-old Muhammad Abdo fled to the south with his family four years ago from escalating conflict in the west, where they have faced hunger and hardship, prioritizing survival over schooling.

"My father suffers from mental illness. I had to work to support my younger brothers. My older brother passed away, leaving behind his children. In this situation, I don't have time to go to school," Abdo told China Central Television (CCTV).

For four years, Abdo had to forsake schooling to work on nearby farms. But hope for education flickered back to life in Abdo's displacement camp, with a makeshift school funded by donations.

"I miss school and the feeling of reading. I had forgotten what that felt like. Now teachers are teaching us again, and I have rediscovered the joy of reading and writing," said Abdo.

According to UNICEF, Yemen has 12 million school-age children, with 4.5 million being out of school, posing a monumental challenge for the country's educational system. Rebuilding schools, rehiring teachers, and ensuring they receive salaries remain critical amid ongoing conflict.

"We are very happy to see them back in school. However, we need more aid. We need to be provided with campuses, books, uniforms, and food to ensure they can continue their educational journey," said Tawfiq Hassan, who is teaching at the makeshift school.

Due to displacement, Abdo missed four years of schooling and is now in fourth grade, significantly older than his classmates.

"My dream is to become a teacher and teach students in school," said Abdo.

Education remains pivotal in reshaping Yemen's future, crucial for the well-being of displaced children and refugees. Addressing political disputes and achieving a ceasefire are essential for improving conditions and upholding their educational rights, fostering stability for Yemen's recovery.

Yemen's children struggle for education amid decade-long conflict

Yemen's children struggle for education amid decade-long conflict

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