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Dallas Stars into their 2nd West final in a row after knocking out last two Cup champions

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Dallas Stars into their 2nd West final in a row after knocking out last two Cup champions
Sport

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Dallas Stars into their 2nd West final in a row after knocking out last two Cup champions

2024-05-19 13:34 Last Updated At:13:40

DALLAS (AP) — The Dallas Stars finally get a little bit of a breather after avoiding another Game 7 on the way to their second Western Conference final in a row.

They knocked out the last two Stanley Cup champions while playing 13 games in 26 nights. The last one stretched past midnight into early Saturday, when Matt Duchene's game-winning goal in double overtime ended Game 6 at Colorado. That came nearly an hour after Dallas thought it had won in the first extra period against the 2022 champs.

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Colorado Avalanche goaltender Alexandar Georgiev, right, deflects a shot by Dallas Stars left wing Mason Marchment during the first overtime of Game 6 of an NHL hockey playoff series Friday, May 17, 2024, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

DALLAS (AP) — The Dallas Stars finally get a little bit of a breather after avoiding another Game 7 on the way to their second Western Conference final in a row.

Dallas Stars goaltender Jake Oettinger makes a glove save against the Colorado Avalanche during the first period of Game 6 of an NHL hockey playoff series Friday, May 17, 2024, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Dallas Stars goaltender Jake Oettinger makes a glove save against the Colorado Avalanche during the first period of Game 6 of an NHL hockey playoff series Friday, May 17, 2024, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Dallas Stars center Joe Pavelski, right, checks Colorado Avalanche right wing Mikko Rantanen during the first period of Game 6 of an NHL hockey playoff series Friday, May 17, 2024, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Dallas Stars center Joe Pavelski, right, checks Colorado Avalanche right wing Mikko Rantanen during the first period of Game 6 of an NHL hockey playoff series Friday, May 17, 2024, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Dallas Stars left wing Mason Marchment, left, hugs goaltender Jake Oettinger after Game 6 of an NHL hockey playoff series Friday, May 17, 2024, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Dallas Stars left wing Mason Marchment, left, hugs goaltender Jake Oettinger after Game 6 of an NHL hockey playoff series Friday, May 17, 2024, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Dallas Stars center Matt Duchene celebrates after scoring the winning goal in the second overtime of Game 6 of an NHL hockey playoff series against the Colorado Avalanche Friday, May 17, 2024, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Dallas Stars center Matt Duchene celebrates after scoring the winning goal in the second overtime of Game 6 of an NHL hockey playoff series against the Colorado Avalanche Friday, May 17, 2024, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Dallas Stars center Matt Duchene, third from left, is congratulated after scoring the winning goal by, from left, right wing Evgenii Dadonov and centers Wyatt Johnston and Radek Faksa in the second overtime of Game 6 of an NHL hockey playoff series Friday, May 17, 2024, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Dallas Stars center Matt Duchene, third from left, is congratulated after scoring the winning goal by, from left, right wing Evgenii Dadonov and centers Wyatt Johnston and Radek Faksa in the second overtime of Game 6 of an NHL hockey playoff series Friday, May 17, 2024, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Dallas Stars head coach Peter De Boer, left, congratulates center Matt Duchene after he scored the winning goal in the second overtime of Game 6 of an NHL hockey playoff series against the Colorado Avalanche Friday, May 17, 2024, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Dallas Stars head coach Peter De Boer, left, congratulates center Matt Duchene after he scored the winning goal in the second overtime of Game 6 of an NHL hockey playoff series against the Colorado Avalanche Friday, May 17, 2024, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Dallas began these playoffs with a seven-game series over the Vegas Golden Knights, who last year beat the Stars in a six-game West final and then won the Stanley Cup.

“For the guys that were here last year, all we wanted was an opportunity to be in the position that we were last year, and snap your fingers and we’re back,” Stars goalie Jake Oettinger said. "Now it’s up to us to change the ending. We couldn’t ask for more than just another opportunity to get another run at it.”

The top-seeded Stars host Game 1 of the West final on Thursday against Edmonton or Vancouver. The Oilers won 5-1 on Saturday night to force a deciding Game 7 in that second-round series, on Monday night in Vancouver.

While Stars coach Pete DeBoer has never lost a Game 7, including one already this postseason against Vegas, they didn't particularly want to have to play another one.

“I don’t know what it is, in how many days, but it seems like it’s been a lot,” forward Mason Marchment said. "The grind is what makes it the playoffs, right? So just keep going and get ready for the next round.”

Marchment put a puck in the net 12 1/2 minutes into the first overtime against the Avs, but on-ice officials immediately waved off the goal and that call stood after replay review. The ruling was that Duchene, whose skates were outside the crease while jostling with defenseman Cale Makar, had impaired goalie Alexandar Georgiev's ability to try to make a play.

“It’s indescribable. You’re so happy and see all the boys hopping over the bench and then I look over and he’s kind of waving it off," Marchment said on the quick change of emotions. "Doesn't really matter now because we won. I thought it was a good goal but ...”

There was no debate about Duchene's goal to win it at 11:42 of the second overtime. After he carried the puck deep and flipped it to the front of the net, it was pinging around sticks before Joe Pavelski, the nearly 40-year-old still looking for his first Stanley Cup, pushed it to Duchene to left of Georgiev.

“Obviously, it can be a little tough to reset after you think it’s over, and hope it’s over, and then it’s kind of a gut-punch a little bit, but that’s kind of what we do,” Duchene said. “We’re a pretty even-keeled group. Everyone just reset and kept going.”

After opening these playoffs losing their first two games at home against Vegas, the Stars are in the West final for the third time in five seasons. They made the Stanley Cup Final in the 2020 playoffs that took place in the Canadian bubble during the COVID-19 pandemic, but lost to Tampa Bay in six games.

This is the seventh conference final for DeBoer, though like Pavelski he is still looking for his first Cup title. This is DeBoer's fifth final in six seasons with three different teams: both years in Dallas, after two with Vegas (2020 and 2021) and San Jose in 2019. He reached the Cup final with New Jersey in 2012, and San Jose in 2016.

“I never take for granted making the playoffs. It’s really hard. It’s really hard to win a round in this league. And it’s obviously even harder to win two and get to a conference final, so on, so on,” DeBoer said. “You never know how that journey is going to end. I think any of the teams left could win. You got to have some luck. You got to have some health. You got to have some bounces. Hopefully, the stars align for us.”

While there was probably no pun intended, everything has lined up nicely for Dallas and DeBoer so far this postseason.

AP NHL: https://apnews.com/hub/nhl

Colorado Avalanche goaltender Alexandar Georgiev, right, deflects a shot by Dallas Stars left wing Mason Marchment during the first overtime of Game 6 of an NHL hockey playoff series Friday, May 17, 2024, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Colorado Avalanche goaltender Alexandar Georgiev, right, deflects a shot by Dallas Stars left wing Mason Marchment during the first overtime of Game 6 of an NHL hockey playoff series Friday, May 17, 2024, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Dallas Stars goaltender Jake Oettinger makes a glove save against the Colorado Avalanche during the first period of Game 6 of an NHL hockey playoff series Friday, May 17, 2024, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Dallas Stars goaltender Jake Oettinger makes a glove save against the Colorado Avalanche during the first period of Game 6 of an NHL hockey playoff series Friday, May 17, 2024, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Dallas Stars center Joe Pavelski, right, checks Colorado Avalanche right wing Mikko Rantanen during the first period of Game 6 of an NHL hockey playoff series Friday, May 17, 2024, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Dallas Stars center Joe Pavelski, right, checks Colorado Avalanche right wing Mikko Rantanen during the first period of Game 6 of an NHL hockey playoff series Friday, May 17, 2024, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Dallas Stars left wing Mason Marchment, left, hugs goaltender Jake Oettinger after Game 6 of an NHL hockey playoff series Friday, May 17, 2024, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Dallas Stars left wing Mason Marchment, left, hugs goaltender Jake Oettinger after Game 6 of an NHL hockey playoff series Friday, May 17, 2024, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Dallas Stars center Matt Duchene celebrates after scoring the winning goal in the second overtime of Game 6 of an NHL hockey playoff series against the Colorado Avalanche Friday, May 17, 2024, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Dallas Stars center Matt Duchene celebrates after scoring the winning goal in the second overtime of Game 6 of an NHL hockey playoff series against the Colorado Avalanche Friday, May 17, 2024, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Dallas Stars center Matt Duchene, third from left, is congratulated after scoring the winning goal by, from left, right wing Evgenii Dadonov and centers Wyatt Johnston and Radek Faksa in the second overtime of Game 6 of an NHL hockey playoff series Friday, May 17, 2024, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Dallas Stars center Matt Duchene, third from left, is congratulated after scoring the winning goal by, from left, right wing Evgenii Dadonov and centers Wyatt Johnston and Radek Faksa in the second overtime of Game 6 of an NHL hockey playoff series Friday, May 17, 2024, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Dallas Stars head coach Peter De Boer, left, congratulates center Matt Duchene after he scored the winning goal in the second overtime of Game 6 of an NHL hockey playoff series against the Colorado Avalanche Friday, May 17, 2024, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Dallas Stars head coach Peter De Boer, left, congratulates center Matt Duchene after he scored the winning goal in the second overtime of Game 6 of an NHL hockey playoff series against the Colorado Avalanche Friday, May 17, 2024, in Denver. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — Civil liberties groups filed a lawsuit Monday to block Louisiana’s new law that requires the Ten Commandments to be displayed in every public school classroom, a measure they contend is unconstitutional.

Plaintiffs in the suit include parents of Louisiana public school children with various religious backgrounds, who are represented by attorneys with the American Civil Liberties Union Foundation, Americans United for Separation of Church and State, the Freedom From Religion Foundation and the New York City law firm Simpson, Thatcher & Bartlett.

“This display sends a message to my children and other students that people of some religious dominations are superior to others,” said the Rev. Jeff Simms, a Presbyterian pastor who is a plaintiff in the suit and father of three children in Louisiana public schools. “This is religious favoritism.”

Under the legislation signed into law by Republican Gov. Jeff Landry last week, all public K-12 classrooms and state-funded universities will be required to display a poster-sized version of the Ten Commandments in “large, easily readable font” next year.

Opponents argue that the law is a violation of separation of church and state and that the display will isolate students, especially those who are not Christian. Proponents say the measure is not solely religious, but that it has historical significance. In the language of the law, the Ten Commandments are “foundational documents of our state and national government.”

Plaintiff Joshua Herlands has two young children in New Orleans public schools who, like their father, are Jewish. There are multiple versions of the Ten Commandments, and Herlands said the specific version mandated for classroom walls does not align with the version from his faith. He worries the display will send a troubling message to his kids and others that “they may be lesser in the eyes of the government.”

“Politicians have absolutely no business forcing their religious beliefs on my kids or any kids, or attempting to indoctrinate them with what they think is the right version of a particular piece of religious text,” Herlands said.

The lawsuit filed Monday seeks a court declaration that the new law, referred to in the lawsuit as HB 71, violates First Amendment clauses forbidding government establishment of religion and guaranteeing religious liberty. It also seeks an order prohibiting the posting of the Ten Commandments in public school classrooms.

“The state’s main interest in passing H.B. 71 was to impose religious beliefs on public-school children, regardless of the harm to students and families,” the lawsuit says. "The law’s primary sponsor and author, Representative Dodie Horton, proclaimed during debate over the bill that it 'seeks to have a display of God’s law in the classroom for children to see what He says is right and what He says is wrong.'"

Defendants include state Superintendent of Education Cade Brumley, members of the state education board and some local school boards.

Landry and Louisiana Attorney General Elizabeth Murrill support the new law, and Murrill has said she is looking forward to defending it. She issued a statement saying she couldn’t comment directly on the lawsuit because she had not yet seen it.

“It seems the ACLU only selectively cares about the First Amendment — it doesn’t care when the Biden administration censors speech or arrests pro-life protesters, but apparently it will fight to prevent posters that discuss our own legal history,” Murrill said in the emailed statement.

The Ten Commandments have long been at the center of lawsuits across the nation.

In 1980, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that a similar Kentucky law violated the establishment clause of the U.S. Constitution, which says Congress can “make no law respecting an establishment of religion.” The high court found that the law had no secular purpose but rather served a plainly religious purpose.

In a more recent ruling, the Supreme Court held in 2005 that such displays in a pair of Kentucky courthouses violated the Constitution. At the same time, the court upheld a Ten Commandments marker on the grounds of the Texas state Capitol in Austin. Those were 5-4 decisions, but the court’s makeup has changed, with a 6-3 conservative majority now.

Although some people think this case may rise to the level of the U.S. Supreme Court and test the conservative members, lawyers for the plaintiffs say that they think this is a clear-cut case

“We think this is already covered by clear Supreme Court precedent,” said Patrick Elliott, the legal director for the Freedom From Religion Foundation. “We think under current law that we will prevail and it would not be necessary for the Supreme Court to review it.”

Other states, including Texas, Oklahoma and Utah, have attempted to pass requirements that the schools display the Ten Commandments. However, with threats of legal battles, none has the mandate in place except for Louisiana.

The posters in Louisiana, which will be paired with a four-paragraph “context statement” describing how the Ten Commandments “were a prominent part of public education for almost three centuries,” must be in place in classrooms by the start of 2025.

The controversial law comes during a new era of conservative leadership in Louisiana under Landry, who replaced two-term Democratic Gov. John Bel Edwards in January. The GOP holds a supermajority in the Legislature, and Republicans hold every statewide elected position, paving the way for lawmakers to push through a conservative agenda.

The case was allotted to U.S. District Judge John deGravelles, nominated to the federal bench by former President Barack Obama.

McGill reported from New Orleans.

This story has been corrected to show that the plaintiffs are represented by lawyers for the American Civil Liberties Union Foundation, Americans United for Separation of Church and State and the Freedom From Religion Foundation.

FILE - Louisiana Gov. Jeff Landry signs bills related to his education plan, Wednesday, June 19, 2024, at Our Lady of Fatima Catholic School in Lafayette, La. Civil liberties groups filed a lawsuit Monday, June 24, challenging Louisiana’s new law that requires the Ten Commandments to be displayed in every public school classroom. (Brad Bowie/The Times-Picayune/The New Orleans Advocate via AP, File)

FILE - Louisiana Gov. Jeff Landry signs bills related to his education plan, Wednesday, June 19, 2024, at Our Lady of Fatima Catholic School in Lafayette, La. Civil liberties groups filed a lawsuit Monday, June 24, challenging Louisiana’s new law that requires the Ten Commandments to be displayed in every public school classroom. (Brad Bowie/The Times-Picayune/The New Orleans Advocate via AP, File)

FILE - A copy of the Ten Commandments is posted along with other historical documents in a hallway of the Georgia Capitol, Thursday, June 20, 2024, in Atlanta. Civil liberties groups filed a lawsuit Monday, June 24, challenging Louisiana’s new law that requires the Ten Commandments to be displayed in every public school classroom. (AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)

FILE - A copy of the Ten Commandments is posted along with other historical documents in a hallway of the Georgia Capitol, Thursday, June 20, 2024, in Atlanta. Civil liberties groups filed a lawsuit Monday, June 24, challenging Louisiana’s new law that requires the Ten Commandments to be displayed in every public school classroom. (AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)

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