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At low-scoring PGA, Morikawa, Schauffele sleep on lead that could vanish by their tee time Sunday

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At low-scoring PGA, Morikawa, Schauffele sleep on lead that could vanish by their tee time Sunday
Sport

Sport

At low-scoring PGA, Morikawa, Schauffele sleep on lead that could vanish by their tee time Sunday

2024-05-19 19:54 Last Updated At:20:00

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Collin Morikawa went to sleep with a share of the lead at the PGA Championship. He's well-aware that by the time he reaches the first tee box for the final round, he might not have it anymore.

A low-scoring Saturday left a major-record 15 players at double-digits under par. They were bunched within five shots of the lead held by Morikawa and Xander Schauffele heading into Sunday's finale at Valhalla Golf Club, which has mostly been soft, calm and defenseless all week.

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Bryson DeChambeau celebrates after a eagle on the 18th hole during the third round of the PGA Championship golf tournament at the Valhalla Golf Club, Saturday, May 18, 2024, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Collin Morikawa went to sleep with a share of the lead at the PGA Championship. He's well-aware that by the time he reaches the first tee box for the final round, he might not have it anymore.

Bryson DeChambeau celebrates after a eagle on the 18th hole during the third round of the PGA Championship golf tournament at the Valhalla Golf Club, Saturday, May 18, 2024, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

Bryson DeChambeau celebrates after a eagle on the 18th hole during the third round of the PGA Championship golf tournament at the Valhalla Golf Club, Saturday, May 18, 2024, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

Justin Thomas waves after the third round of the PGA Championship golf tournament at the Valhalla Golf Club, Saturday, May 18, 2024, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

Justin Thomas waves after the third round of the PGA Championship golf tournament at the Valhalla Golf Club, Saturday, May 18, 2024, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

Xander Schauffele watches his tee shot on the fourth hole during the third round of the PGA Championship golf tournament at the Valhalla Golf Club, Saturday, May 18, 2024, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/Matt York)

Xander Schauffele watches his tee shot on the fourth hole during the third round of the PGA Championship golf tournament at the Valhalla Golf Club, Saturday, May 18, 2024, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/Matt York)

Collin Morikawa watches his tee shot on the 18th hole during the third round of the PGA Championship golf tournament at the Valhalla Golf Club, Saturday, May 18, 2024, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

Collin Morikawa watches his tee shot on the 18th hole during the third round of the PGA Championship golf tournament at the Valhalla Golf Club, Saturday, May 18, 2024, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

Bryson DeChambeau celebrates after a eagle on the 18th hole during the third round of the PGA Championship golf tournament at the Valhalla Golf Club, Saturday, May 18, 2024, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

Bryson DeChambeau celebrates after a eagle on the 18th hole during the third round of the PGA Championship golf tournament at the Valhalla Golf Club, Saturday, May 18, 2024, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

Collin Morikawa waves after making a putt on the 18th hole during the third round of the PGA Championship golf tournament at the Valhalla Golf Club, Saturday, May 18, 2024, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

Collin Morikawa waves after making a putt on the 18th hole during the third round of the PGA Championship golf tournament at the Valhalla Golf Club, Saturday, May 18, 2024, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

“I’ve been in tournaments where you've lost the lead by the time you tee off,” said Morikawa, in search of his third major. “It could be like that tomorrow, who knows?”

Among those with a chance to catch up to Morikawa and Schauffele before they hit their first shots are Sahith Theegala. He shot 63 to finish at 14 under, one shot out of the lead.

Also, Shane Lowry. The Irishman missed a birdie putt by a sliver on the 18th hole that would have given him a major-championship record of 61. Lowry is at 13 under.

“I had a weird feeling through seven holes that I was going to shoot 61 today,” said Justin Rose, who played with Lowry on Saturday, made five birdies over his first seven holes, but “only” shot 64.

He is three shots out of the lead.

Some other angles to watch on the final day at the PGA:

X FACTOR

Last week, Schauffele had a one-shot lead over Rory McIlroy heading into the final round of the Wells Fargo and ended up losing by five. He says to win his first major, and win his first tournament since the 2022 Scottish Open, he needs to “stay in my lane,” and not worry about other scores or other players.

Along those lines, he is trying to treat Sunday like a Sunday at any other tournament, not like a day where he is trying to finally break through.

“At the end of the day, wherever the cards fall, they fall,” said Schauffele, who won a gold medal at the Olympics three years ago. “Yeah, it would mean a lot, obviously.”

MAD SCIENTIST

Bryson DeChambeau says he's feeling as good or better about his game as he did in 2020. That was the year he overpowered Winged Foot to win his first major — the U.S. Open.

After making eagle on the par-5 18th, he'll head into Sunday only two shots off the lead at Valhalla.

DeChambeau said part of his renaissance comes because he's excited about new clubs he's helped craft using the 3D printing process.

“It’s a slow but study grind to improving my equipment each and every week,” he said.

He used a 6-iron to chip in from a tight lie in front of the 18th green for an eagle.

“Exhilarating,” he called it. “I haven’t felt like that in a long time. The only other time I felt like it was when I shot 58 at Greenbrier” on the LIV tour last year.

COMEBACK KID

Justin Thomas came from seven shots back to win the PGA Championship two years ago in 2022.

By those standards, Sunday's comeback looks doable.

Thomas chipped in from 30 yards away in the rough on the par-3 14th to highlight a 67 that sent him home five shots out of the lead.

Thomas grew up in Louisville and knows no win at Valhalla would be more popular.

“I saw my freshman year English teacher today. I saw a teammate of mine, a guy that I drove to school with every day in high school,” he said. “There’s just a lot of people I’m seeing that I didn’t necessarily (think I'd see), but it’s also where I grew up, so I guess it’s a part of it.”

AP golf: https://apnews.com/hub/golf

Bryson DeChambeau celebrates after a eagle on the 18th hole during the third round of the PGA Championship golf tournament at the Valhalla Golf Club, Saturday, May 18, 2024, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

Bryson DeChambeau celebrates after a eagle on the 18th hole during the third round of the PGA Championship golf tournament at the Valhalla Golf Club, Saturday, May 18, 2024, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

Bryson DeChambeau celebrates after a eagle on the 18th hole during the third round of the PGA Championship golf tournament at the Valhalla Golf Club, Saturday, May 18, 2024, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

Bryson DeChambeau celebrates after a eagle on the 18th hole during the third round of the PGA Championship golf tournament at the Valhalla Golf Club, Saturday, May 18, 2024, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

Justin Thomas waves after the third round of the PGA Championship golf tournament at the Valhalla Golf Club, Saturday, May 18, 2024, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

Justin Thomas waves after the third round of the PGA Championship golf tournament at the Valhalla Golf Club, Saturday, May 18, 2024, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

Xander Schauffele watches his tee shot on the fourth hole during the third round of the PGA Championship golf tournament at the Valhalla Golf Club, Saturday, May 18, 2024, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/Matt York)

Xander Schauffele watches his tee shot on the fourth hole during the third round of the PGA Championship golf tournament at the Valhalla Golf Club, Saturday, May 18, 2024, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/Matt York)

Collin Morikawa watches his tee shot on the 18th hole during the third round of the PGA Championship golf tournament at the Valhalla Golf Club, Saturday, May 18, 2024, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

Collin Morikawa watches his tee shot on the 18th hole during the third round of the PGA Championship golf tournament at the Valhalla Golf Club, Saturday, May 18, 2024, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/Jeff Roberson)

Bryson DeChambeau celebrates after a eagle on the 18th hole during the third round of the PGA Championship golf tournament at the Valhalla Golf Club, Saturday, May 18, 2024, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

Bryson DeChambeau celebrates after a eagle on the 18th hole during the third round of the PGA Championship golf tournament at the Valhalla Golf Club, Saturday, May 18, 2024, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

Collin Morikawa waves after making a putt on the 18th hole during the third round of the PGA Championship golf tournament at the Valhalla Golf Club, Saturday, May 18, 2024, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

Collin Morikawa waves after making a putt on the 18th hole during the third round of the PGA Championship golf tournament at the Valhalla Golf Club, Saturday, May 18, 2024, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is headed into its final few weeks with about a third of the cases heard this year still undecided, including ones that could reshape the law on everything from guns to abortion to social media. The justices are also still weighing whether former President Donald Trump is immune from criminal prosecution in the election interference case against him, more than a month after hearing arguments.

The court heard 61 cases this term, and 19 remain unresolved.

Here's a look at some of the major undecided cases:

Donald Trump is arguing that former presidents are immune from prosecution for official acts they took in office and that the indictment he faces on charges of election interference must be dismissed.

The Supreme Court has previously ruled that former presidents can’t be sued in civil cases for what they did in office, but it has never weighed in on criminal immunity.

The timing of the decision may be as important as the outcome. Trump’s trial in Washington, D.C., may not take place before the November election, even if the court rules he is not immune.

A former Pennsylvania police officer is challenging the validity of obstruction charges brought against hundreds of people who took part in the violent assault on the Capitol on Jan. 6, 2021. Trump faces the same charge of obstructing an official proceeding.

The issue is whether a law meant to discourage tampering with documents sought in investigations can be used against the Capitol rioters.

There’s a second abortion case on the docket this year: whether doctors can provide that medical procedure in emergencies in states that banned abortion after the court overturned Roe v. Wade.

In a case out of Idaho, the Biden administration says abortions must be allowed in emergencies where a woman’s health is at serious risk.

The state argues that its strict abortion ban does allow abortions to save a woman’s life, and doesn’t need to expand exceptions for health risks.

The justices are weighing whether to uphold a federal law that seeks to protect domestic violence victims by keeping guns away from the people alleged to have abused them. An appeals court struck down a law that prohibits people under domestic violence restraining orders from possessing firearms. That court found that the law violated the 2nd Amendment right to “keep and bear arms” following the Supreme Court’s 2022 ruling that expanded gun rights and changed how courts are supposed to evaluate gun restrictions.

The most significant Supreme Court case in decades on homelessness centers on whether people can be banned from sleeping outdoors when shelter space is lacking.

A San Francisco-based appeals court decision said that amounts to cruel and unusual punishment.

Leaders from California and across the West say that the ruling makes it harder for them to regulate homeless encampments encroaching on sidewalks and other public places.

Advocates say it would criminalize homelessness just as rising costs have pushed the number of people without a permanent place to live to record levels.

The justices could overturn a 40-year-old decision that has been cited thousands of times in federal court cases and used to uphold regulations on the environment, public health, workplace safety and consumer protections. The decision colloquially known as Chevron calls on judges to defer to federal regulators when the words of a statute are not crystal clear. The decision has long been targeted by conservative and business interests who say Chevron robs judges of their authority and gives too much power to regulators.

Three cases remain unresolved at the intersection of social media and government.

Two cases involve social media laws in Texas and Florida that would limit how Facebook, TikTok, X, YouTube and other social media platforms regulate content posted by their users. While the details vary, both laws aimed to address conservative complaints that the social media companies were liberal-leaning and censored users based on their viewpoints, especially on the political right.

In the third case, Republican-led states are suing the Biden administration over how far the federal government can go to combat controversial social media posts on topics including COVID-19 and election security. A federal appeals court sided with the states in finding that administration officials unconstitutionally coerced the platforms to limit conservative points of view.

The Supreme Court controls the fate of a nationwide settlement with OxyContin maker Purdue Pharma that would allocate billions of dollars to combat the opioid epidemic, but also provide a legal shield for members of the Sackler family who own the company. The settlement has been on hold since last summer after the Supreme Court agreed to weigh in.

Republican-led, energy-producing states and the steel industry want the court to put the Environmental Protection Agency’s air pollution-fighting “good neighbor” plan on hold while legal challenges continue. The plan aims to protect downwind states that receive unwanted air pollution from other states.

Another important regulatory case could strip the SEC of a major tool in fighting securities fraud and have far-reaching effects on other regulatory agencies. The court is being asked to rule that people facing civil fraud complaints have the right to a jury trial in federal court.

Follow the AP's coverage of the U.S. Supreme Court at https://apnews.com/hub/us-supreme-court.

Visitors pose for photographs outside the U.S. Supreme Court Tuesday, June 18, 2024, in Washington. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Visitors pose for photographs outside the U.S. Supreme Court Tuesday, June 18, 2024, in Washington. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Visitors pose for photographs outside the U.S. Supreme Court Tuesday, June 18, 2024, in Washington. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Visitors pose for photographs outside the U.S. Supreme Court Tuesday, June 18, 2024, in Washington. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

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