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Former All-Pro running back David Johnson retires after 8 seasons in the NFL

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Former All-Pro running back David Johnson retires after 8 seasons in the NFL
News

News

Former All-Pro running back David Johnson retires after 8 seasons in the NFL

2024-05-20 04:38 Last Updated At:04:40

PHOENIX (AP) — Former All-Pro running back David Johnson says he's retiring from the NFL after eight seasons.

The 32-year-old made the announcement on Instagram Sunday. Johnson had his All-Pro season for the Arizona Cardinals in 2016, leading the NFL with 2,118 total yards from scrimmage, including 1,239 rushing and 879 receiving.

“There’s been highs and lows, but I’ve felt very fortunate and honored by the people who’ve supported me along this journey,” Johnson posted. “The relationships and brotherhoods I’ve formed with so many of my dawgs will never be forgotten. I’m going to miss the locker room, dining hall, and before meeting vibes.”

Johnson injured his left wrist in the opening game of the 2017 season and was eventually put on injured reserve. He bounced back to run for 940 yards in 2018, but could never quite reach the heights of his breakout season two years prior.

Johnson was dealt to the Houston Texans in 2020 in the trade that brought All-Pro receiver DeAndre Hopkins to Arizona. He played two seasons for the Texans and last played a regular-season game for the New Orleans Saints in 2022.

The Cardinals picked Johnson in the third round of the 2015 draft out of Northern Iowa. He finished his career with 6,876 total yards and 57 touchdowns.

“I’m looking forward to my next career path in life,” Johnson posted. “I don’t know exactly what that will be, but I hope it will bring me the same passion, excitement, and love as football did!”

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FILE - New Orleans Saints running back David Johnson runs during the first half an NFL football game against the Carolina Panthers in New Orleans, Jan. 8, 2023. Johnson says he's retiring from the NFL after eight seasons. The 32-year-old made the announcement on Instagram Sunday, May 19, 2024. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)

FILE - New Orleans Saints running back David Johnson runs during the first half an NFL football game against the Carolina Panthers in New Orleans, Jan. 8, 2023. Johnson says he's retiring from the NFL after eight seasons. The 32-year-old made the announcement on Instagram Sunday, May 19, 2024. (AP Photo/Gerald Herbert, File)

TAMPICO, Mexico (AP) — Tropical Storm Alberto formed on Wednesday in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season.

Alberto, which is bringing strong winds, heavy rainfall and some flooding along the coasts of Texas and Mexico, is expected to make landfall in northern Mexico early Thursday.

“The heavy rainfall and the water, as usual, is the biggest story in tropical storms,” said Michael Brennan, director of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Hurricane Center.

The National Hurricane Center said late Wednesday that Alberto was located about 135 miles (220 kilometers) east of Tampico, Mexico, and about 320 miles (510 kilometers) south-southeast of Brownsville, Texas, with maximum sustained winds of 50 mph (85 kph). The storm was moving west at 9 miles per hour.

The center of the storm was expected to reach the northeastern coast of Mexico south of the mouth of the Rio Grande by Thursday morning.

As much as 5 inches (13 centimeters) to 10 inches (25 centimeters) of rain was expected in some areas along the Texas coast, with even higher isolated totals possible, Brennan said. He said some higher locations in Mexico could see as much as 20 inches (50 centimeters) of rain, which could result in mudslides and flash flooding, especially in the states of Tamaulipas, Coahuila and Nuevo Leon.

The municipal government of Tampico, a port city in Tamaulipas state, announced Wednesday afternoon that authorities had activated a command center in coordination with the water, electricity and oil companies.

Many residents were excited about the prospect of heavy showers, as Tamaulipas and most of Mexico has been dealing with extreme droughts.

“We have been needing this water that we’re now getting, thank God. Let’s hope that we only get water,” said Blanca Coronel Moral, a resident of Tampico. “Our lagoon, which gives us drinking water, is completely dry.”

Tamaulipas Gov. Américo Villarreal said Wednesday on X that schools across the state will remain closed between Wednesday and Friday.

The coordinator of civil protection in Tamaulipas, Luis Gerardo Gonzalez, said they have 333 shelters distributed throughout the state at each municipality. “As the storm moves, we will be opening up more shelters.”

Authorities urged residents to be aware of the alerts the state and municipal civil protections are sharing. They anticipate the storm arriving overnight with communities closest to the coast most affected.

Tropical storm warnings were in effect from the Texas coast at San Luis Pass southward to the mouth of the Rio Grande and from the northeastern coast of Mexico south of the mouth of the Rio Grande to Tecolutla.

“Rapid weakening is expected once the center moves inland, and Alberto is likely to dissipate over Mexico” on Thursday, the center said.

The U.S. National Weather Service said the main hazard for southern coastal Texas is flooding from excess rain. On Wednesday, the NWS said, there is “a high probability” of flash flooding in southern coastal Texas. Tornadoes or waterspouts are possible.

NOAA predicts the hurricane season that began June 1 and runs through Nov. 30 is likely to be well above average, with between 17 and 25 named storms. The forecast calls for as many as 13 hurricanes and four major hurricanes.

An average Atlantic hurricane season produces 14 named storms, seven of them hurricanes and three major hurricanes.

Brennan said there will be dangerous rip currents from the storm and drivers should watch out for road closures and turn around if they see water covering roadways.

Areas along the Texas coast were seeing some road flooding and dangerous rip currents Wednesday, and waterspouts have been spotted offshore. “We’ve seen a few brief spin-ups and some waterspouts out there,” said Tyler Castillo, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service office in Corpus Christi.

Tim Cady, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Houston, said they’ll be keeping an eye on coastal flooding as high tide approaches Thursday morning.

“When we have these strong onshore winds combined with the high tide, that can result in coastal inundation, particularly in our lower-lying coastal areas,” Cady said.

A no-name storm earlier in June dumped more than 20 inches (50 centimeters) of rain on parts of South Florida, stranding numerous motorists on flooded streets and pushing water into some homes in low-lying areas.

“People underestimate the power of water and they sometimes don’t always take rainfall and the threats that come with it seriously, especially if you are driving in an area and you see water covering the road, you don’t want to drive into it,” Brennan said.

Palapas sit deserted on a beach in Miramar, in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, Wednesday, June 19, 2024. Tropical Storm Alberto formed on Wednesday in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of the hurricane season. (AP Photo/Fabian Melendez)

Palapas sit deserted on a beach in Miramar, in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, Wednesday, June 19, 2024. Tropical Storm Alberto formed on Wednesday in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of the hurricane season. (AP Photo/Fabian Melendez)

Tire tracks mark the sand on a deserted beach in Miramar, in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, Wednesday, June 19, 2024. Tropical Storm Alberto formed on Wednesday in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of the hurricane season. (AP Photo/Fabian Melendez)

Tire tracks mark the sand on a deserted beach in Miramar, in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, Wednesday, June 19, 2024. Tropical Storm Alberto formed on Wednesday in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of the hurricane season. (AP Photo/Fabian Melendez)

A bird flies over a deserted pier in Miramar, in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, Wednesday, June 19, 2024. Tropical Storm Alberto formed on Wednesday in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of the hurricane season. (AP Photo/Fabian Melendez)

A bird flies over a deserted pier in Miramar, in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, Wednesday, June 19, 2024. Tropical Storm Alberto formed on Wednesday in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of the hurricane season. (AP Photo/Fabian Melendez)

Megan Johnston drinks coffee as she sits on the seawall along Seawall Boulevard as rain falls on Wednesday, June 19, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Megan Johnston drinks coffee as she sits on the seawall along Seawall Boulevard as rain falls on Wednesday, June 19, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Roy Quiroz looks back at his wife, Minda, as he crossed a flooded section of Kempner Street, Wednesday, June 19, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Roy Quiroz looks back at his wife, Minda, as he crossed a flooded section of Kempner Street, Wednesday, June 19, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Richard Tumlinson watches waves crash along the seawall as he passes the 1900 storm memorial while rain rollsl in, Wednesday, June 18, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. The statue honors the more than 8,000 people killed in the hurricane called "The Great Storm" in 1900. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Richard Tumlinson watches waves crash along the seawall as he passes the 1900 storm memorial while rain rollsl in, Wednesday, June 18, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. The statue honors the more than 8,000 people killed in the hurricane called "The Great Storm" in 1900. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Waves crash over a jetty along Seawall Boulevard Wednesday, June 18, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Waves crash over a jetty along Seawall Boulevard Wednesday, June 18, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Jeremy Reddout and his daughter, Elexus, enjoy the waves between Murdoch's and Pleasure Pier as rain falls, Wednesday, June 19, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Jeremy Reddout and his daughter, Elexus, enjoy the waves between Murdoch's and Pleasure Pier as rain falls, Wednesday, June 19, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Megan Johnston sits on the seawall along Seawall Boulevard as rain falls, Wednesday, June 18, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Megan Johnston sits on the seawall along Seawall Boulevard as rain falls, Wednesday, June 18, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Galveston city worker Sean Kirby checks trash cans along Seawall Boulevard as rain falls,Wednesday, June 18, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Galveston city worker Sean Kirby checks trash cans along Seawall Boulevard as rain falls,Wednesday, June 18, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Roy Quiroz and his wife, Minda, brace themselves with their umbrella as strong winds kick up as they cross a flooded section of The Strand near Kempner Street , Wednesday, June 19, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Roy Quiroz and his wife, Minda, brace themselves with their umbrella as strong winds kick up as they cross a flooded section of The Strand near Kempner Street , Wednesday, June 19, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Galveston city worker Sean Kirby checks trash cans along Seawall Boulevard as rain falls Wednesday, June 18, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Galveston city worker Sean Kirby checks trash cans along Seawall Boulevard as rain falls Wednesday, June 18, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Roy Quiroz and his wife, Minda, cross a flooded section of The Strand near Kempner Street as rain falls Wednesday, June 19, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Roy Quiroz and his wife, Minda, cross a flooded section of The Strand near Kempner Street as rain falls Wednesday, June 19, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Elexus Reddout and her father, Jeremy, enjoy the waves between Murdoch's and Pleasure Pier Wednesday, June 19, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Elexus Reddout and her father, Jeremy, enjoy the waves between Murdoch's and Pleasure Pier Wednesday, June 19, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

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