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Britain slammed in inquiry for infecting thousands with tainted blood and covering up the scandal

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Britain slammed in inquiry for infecting thousands with tainted blood and covering up the scandal
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News

Britain slammed in inquiry for infecting thousands with tainted blood and covering up the scandal

2024-05-21 11:48 Last Updated At:21:45

LONDON (AP) — British authorities and the country's public health service knowingly exposed tens of thousands of patients to deadly infections through contaminated blood and blood products, and hid the truth about the disaster for decades, an inquiry into the U.K.’s infected blood scandal found Monday.

An estimated 3,000 people in the United Kingdom are believed to have died and many others were left with lifelong illnesses after receiving blood or blood products tainted with HIV or hepatitis in the 1970s to the early 1990s.

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Britain's former health minister David Owen and former health secretary and Mayor of Manchester Andy Burnham listen, during a press conference at Church House in Westminster, after the publication of the Infected Blood Inquiry report, in London, Monday, May 20, 2024. An inquiry has found that British authorities and the public health service knowingly exposed tens of thousands of patients to deadly infections through contaminated blood and blood products and hid the truth about the disaster for decades. (Stefan Rousseau/PA via AP)

LONDON (AP) — British authorities and the country's public health service knowingly exposed tens of thousands of patients to deadly infections through contaminated blood and blood products, and hid the truth about the disaster for decades, an inquiry into the U.K.’s infected blood scandal found Monday.

CORRECTS FATHER DENNIS TO HUSBAND BARRIE - Cressida Haughton, left, who's father Derek and Deborah Dennis who's husband Barrie died, react outside Central Hall in Westminster in London, after the publication of the Infected Blood Inquiry report, Monday May 20, 2024. British authorities and the country's public health service knowingly exposed tens of thousands of patients to deadly infections through contaminated blood and blood products, and hid the truth about the disaster for decades, an inquiry into the U.K.’s infected blood scandal found Monday. (Jeff Moore/PA via AP)

CORRECTS FATHER DENNIS TO HUSBAND BARRIE - Cressida Haughton, left, who's father Derek and Deborah Dennis who's husband Barrie died, react outside Central Hall in Westminster in London, after the publication of the Infected Blood Inquiry report, Monday May 20, 2024. British authorities and the country's public health service knowingly exposed tens of thousands of patients to deadly infections through contaminated blood and blood products, and hid the truth about the disaster for decades, an inquiry into the U.K.’s infected blood scandal found Monday. (Jeff Moore/PA via AP)

CORRECTS FATHER DENNIS TO HUSBAND BARRIE - Cressida Haughton, left, who's father Derek and Deborah Dennis who's husband Barrie died, react outside Central Hall in Westminster in London, after the publication of the Infected Blood Inquiry report, Monday May 20, 2024. British authorities and the country's public health service knowingly exposed tens of thousands of patients to deadly infections through contaminated blood and blood products, and hid the truth about the disaster for decades, an inquiry into the U.K.’s infected blood scandal found Monday. (Jeff Moore/PA via AP)

CORRECTS FATHER DENNIS TO HUSBAND BARRIE - Cressida Haughton, left, who's father Derek and Deborah Dennis who's husband Barrie died, react outside Central Hall in Westminster in London, after the publication of the Infected Blood Inquiry report, Monday May 20, 2024. British authorities and the country's public health service knowingly exposed tens of thousands of patients to deadly infections through contaminated blood and blood products, and hid the truth about the disaster for decades, an inquiry into the U.K.’s infected blood scandal found Monday. (Jeff Moore/PA via AP)

Cressida Haughton, left, who's father Derek and Deborah Dennis who's father Dennis died, gather outside the Central Hall in Westminster in London, after the publication of the Infected Blood Inquiry report, Monday May 20, 2024. British authorities and the country's public health service knowingly exposed tens of thousands of patients to deadly infections through contaminated blood and blood products, and hid the truth about the disaster for decades, an inquiry into the U.K.’s infected blood scandal found Monday. (Jeff Moore/PA via AP)

Cressida Haughton, left, who's father Derek and Deborah Dennis who's father Dennis died, gather outside the Central Hall in Westminster in London, after the publication of the Infected Blood Inquiry report, Monday May 20, 2024. British authorities and the country's public health service knowingly exposed tens of thousands of patients to deadly infections through contaminated blood and blood products, and hid the truth about the disaster for decades, an inquiry into the U.K.’s infected blood scandal found Monday. (Jeff Moore/PA via AP)

People carry pictures of relatives as they gather outside Central Hall in Westminster in London, after the publication of the Infected Blood Inquiry report, Monday May 20, 2024. British authorities and the country's public health service knowingly exposed tens of thousands of patients to deadly infections through contaminated blood and blood products, and hid the truth about the disaster for decades, an inquiry into the U.K.’s infected blood scandal found Monday. (Jeff Moore/PA via AP)

People carry pictures of relatives as they gather outside Central Hall in Westminster in London, after the publication of the Infected Blood Inquiry report, Monday May 20, 2024. British authorities and the country's public health service knowingly exposed tens of thousands of patients to deadly infections through contaminated blood and blood products, and hid the truth about the disaster for decades, an inquiry into the U.K.’s infected blood scandal found Monday. (Jeff Moore/PA via AP)

Cressida Haughton, left, who's father Derek and Deborah Dennis who's father Dennis died, react outside Central Hall in Westminster in London, after the publication of the Infected Blood Inquiry report, Monday May 20, 2024. British authorities and the country's public health service knowingly exposed tens of thousands of patients to deadly infections through contaminated blood and blood products, and hid the truth about the disaster for decades, an inquiry into the U.K.’s infected blood scandal found Monday. (Jeff Moore/PA via AP)

Cressida Haughton, left, who's father Derek and Deborah Dennis who's father Dennis died, react outside Central Hall in Westminster in London, after the publication of the Infected Blood Inquiry report, Monday May 20, 2024. British authorities and the country's public health service knowingly exposed tens of thousands of patients to deadly infections through contaminated blood and blood products, and hid the truth about the disaster for decades, an inquiry into the U.K.’s infected blood scandal found Monday. (Jeff Moore/PA via AP)

Infected blood campaigners gather in Parliament Square, ahead of the publication of the final report into the scandal, in London, Sunday, May 19, 2024. The final report of the U.K.’s infected blood inquiry will be published Monday, six years after it started its work. The inquiry heard evidence as to how thousands of people contracted HIV or hepatitis from transfusions of tainted blood and blood products in the 1970s and 1980s. (Aaron Chown/PA via AP)

Infected blood campaigners gather in Parliament Square, ahead of the publication of the final report into the scandal, in London, Sunday, May 19, 2024. The final report of the U.K.’s infected blood inquiry will be published Monday, six years after it started its work. The inquiry heard evidence as to how thousands of people contracted HIV or hepatitis from transfusions of tainted blood and blood products in the 1970s and 1980s. (Aaron Chown/PA via AP)

Infected blood campaigners hug during a gathering at Parliament Square, ahead of the publication of the final report into the scandal, in London, Sunday, May 19, 2024. The final report of the U.K.’s infected blood inquiry will be published Monday, six years after it started its work. The inquiry heard evidence as to how thousands of people contracted HIV or hepatitis from transfusions of tainted blood and blood products in the 1970s and 1980s. (Aaron Chown/PA via AP)

Infected blood campaigners hug during a gathering at Parliament Square, ahead of the publication of the final report into the scandal, in London, Sunday, May 19, 2024. The final report of the U.K.’s infected blood inquiry will be published Monday, six years after it started its work. The inquiry heard evidence as to how thousands of people contracted HIV or hepatitis from transfusions of tainted blood and blood products in the 1970s and 1980s. (Aaron Chown/PA via AP)

Infected blood campaigners gather in Parliament Square, ahead of the publication of the final report into the scandal, in London, Sunday, May 19, 2024. The final report of the U.K.’s infected blood inquiry will be published Monday, six years after it started its work. The inquiry heard evidence as to how thousands of people contracted HIV or hepatitis from transfusions of tainted blood and blood products in the 1970s and 1980s. (Aaron Chown/PA via AP)

Infected blood campaigners gather in Parliament Square, ahead of the publication of the final report into the scandal, in London, Sunday, May 19, 2024. The final report of the U.K.’s infected blood inquiry will be published Monday, six years after it started its work. The inquiry heard evidence as to how thousands of people contracted HIV or hepatitis from transfusions of tainted blood and blood products in the 1970s and 1980s. (Aaron Chown/PA via AP)

Infected blood campaigners react as they gather in Parliament Square, ahead of the publication of the final report into the scandal, in London, Sunday, May 19, 2024. The final report of the U.K.’s infected blood inquiry will be published Monday, six years after it started its work. The inquiry heard evidence as to how thousands of people contracted HIV or hepatitis from transfusions of tainted blood and blood products in the 1970s and 1980s. (Aaron Chown/PA via AP)

Infected blood campaigners react as they gather in Parliament Square, ahead of the publication of the final report into the scandal, in London, Sunday, May 19, 2024. The final report of the U.K.’s infected blood inquiry will be published Monday, six years after it started its work. The inquiry heard evidence as to how thousands of people contracted HIV or hepatitis from transfusions of tainted blood and blood products in the 1970s and 1980s. (Aaron Chown/PA via AP)

The scandal is widely seen as the deadliest disaster in the history of Britain’s state-run National Health Service since its inception in 1948.

Former judge Brian Langstaff, who chaired the inquiry, slammed successive governments and medical professionals for “a catalogue of failures” and refusal to admit responsibility to save face and expense. He found that deliberate attempts were made to conceal the scandal, and there was evidence of government officials destroying documents.

“This disaster was not an accident. The infections happened because those in authority — doctors, the blood services and successive governments — did not put patient safety first,” he said. “The response of those in authority served to compound people’s suffering.”

Prime Minister Rishi Sunak apologized to the victims and said the report’s publication marked “a day of shame for the British state.”

Campaigners have fought for decades to bring official failings to light and secure government compensation. The inquiry was finally approved in 2017, and over the past four years it reviewed evidence from more than 5,000 witnesses and more than 100,000 documents.

Many of those affected were people with hemophilia, a condition affecting the blood’s ability to clot. In the 1970s, patients were given a new treatment that the U.K. imported from the United States. Some of the plasma used to make the blood products was traced to high-risk donors, including prison inmates, who were paid to give blood samples.

Because manufacturers of the treatment mixed plasma from thousands of donations, one infected donor would compromise the whole batch.

The report said around 1,250 people with bleeding disorders, including 380 children, were infected with HIV -tainted blood products. Three-quarters of them have died. Up to 5,000 others who received the blood products developed chronic hepatitis C, a type of liver infection.

Meanwhile an estimated 26,800 others were also infected with hepatitis C after receiving blood transfusions, often given in hospitals after childbirth, surgery or an accident, the report said.

“I am truly sorry,” Sunak told a packed and silent House of Commons. “Today’s report shows a decades-long moral failure at the heart of our national life. From the National Health Service to the civil service, to ministers in successive governments, at every level the people and institutions in which we place our trust failed in the most harrowing and devastating way.”

He vowed to "right this historic wrong” and said details of a compensation package, expected to total 10 billion pounds ($12.7 billion), would be announced Tuesday.

The report said many of the deaths and illnesses could have been avoided had the government taken steps to address the risks linked to blood transfusions or the use of blood products. Since the 1940s and the early 1980s it has been known that hepatitis and the cause of AIDS respectively could be transmitted this way, the inquiry said.

Langstaff said that unlike a long list of developed countries, officials in the U.K. failed to ensure rigorous blood donor selection and screening of blood products. At one school attended by children with hemophilia, public health officials gave the children “multiple, riskier” treatments as part of research, the report said.

He added that over the years authorities “compounded the agony by refusing to accept that wrong had been done," falsely telling patients they had received the best treatment available and that blood screening had been introduced at the earliest opportunity. When people were found to be infected, officials delayed informing them about what happened.

Langstaff said that while each failure on its own was serious, taken “together they are a calamity.”

Andy Evans, of campaign group Tainted Blood, told reporters that he and others “felt like we were shouting into the wind during the last 40 years.”

“We have been gaslit for generations. This report today brings an end to that. It looks to the future as well and says this cannot continue,” he said.

Diana Johnson, a lawmaker who has long campaigned for the victims, said she hoped that those found responsible for the disaster will face justice — including prosecution — though the investigations have taken so long that some of the key players may well have died since.

“There has to be accountability for the actions that were taken, even if it was 30, 40, 50 years ago," she said.

Jill Lawless in London contributed to this report.

Britain's former health minister David Owen and former health secretary and Mayor of Manchester Andy Burnham listen, during a press conference at Church House in Westminster, after the publication of the Infected Blood Inquiry report, in London, Monday, May 20, 2024. An inquiry has found that British authorities and the public health service knowingly exposed tens of thousands of patients to deadly infections through contaminated blood and blood products and hid the truth about the disaster for decades. (Stefan Rousseau/PA via AP)

Britain's former health minister David Owen and former health secretary and Mayor of Manchester Andy Burnham listen, during a press conference at Church House in Westminster, after the publication of the Infected Blood Inquiry report, in London, Monday, May 20, 2024. An inquiry has found that British authorities and the public health service knowingly exposed tens of thousands of patients to deadly infections through contaminated blood and blood products and hid the truth about the disaster for decades. (Stefan Rousseau/PA via AP)

CORRECTS FATHER DENNIS TO HUSBAND BARRIE - Cressida Haughton, left, who's father Derek and Deborah Dennis who's husband Barrie died, react outside Central Hall in Westminster in London, after the publication of the Infected Blood Inquiry report, Monday May 20, 2024. British authorities and the country's public health service knowingly exposed tens of thousands of patients to deadly infections through contaminated blood and blood products, and hid the truth about the disaster for decades, an inquiry into the U.K.’s infected blood scandal found Monday. (Jeff Moore/PA via AP)

CORRECTS FATHER DENNIS TO HUSBAND BARRIE - Cressida Haughton, left, who's father Derek and Deborah Dennis who's husband Barrie died, react outside Central Hall in Westminster in London, after the publication of the Infected Blood Inquiry report, Monday May 20, 2024. British authorities and the country's public health service knowingly exposed tens of thousands of patients to deadly infections through contaminated blood and blood products, and hid the truth about the disaster for decades, an inquiry into the U.K.’s infected blood scandal found Monday. (Jeff Moore/PA via AP)

CORRECTS FATHER DENNIS TO HUSBAND BARRIE - Cressida Haughton, left, who's father Derek and Deborah Dennis who's husband Barrie died, react outside Central Hall in Westminster in London, after the publication of the Infected Blood Inquiry report, Monday May 20, 2024. British authorities and the country's public health service knowingly exposed tens of thousands of patients to deadly infections through contaminated blood and blood products, and hid the truth about the disaster for decades, an inquiry into the U.K.’s infected blood scandal found Monday. (Jeff Moore/PA via AP)

CORRECTS FATHER DENNIS TO HUSBAND BARRIE - Cressida Haughton, left, who's father Derek and Deborah Dennis who's husband Barrie died, react outside Central Hall in Westminster in London, after the publication of the Infected Blood Inquiry report, Monday May 20, 2024. British authorities and the country's public health service knowingly exposed tens of thousands of patients to deadly infections through contaminated blood and blood products, and hid the truth about the disaster for decades, an inquiry into the U.K.’s infected blood scandal found Monday. (Jeff Moore/PA via AP)

Cressida Haughton, left, who's father Derek and Deborah Dennis who's father Dennis died, gather outside the Central Hall in Westminster in London, after the publication of the Infected Blood Inquiry report, Monday May 20, 2024. British authorities and the country's public health service knowingly exposed tens of thousands of patients to deadly infections through contaminated blood and blood products, and hid the truth about the disaster for decades, an inquiry into the U.K.’s infected blood scandal found Monday. (Jeff Moore/PA via AP)

Cressida Haughton, left, who's father Derek and Deborah Dennis who's father Dennis died, gather outside the Central Hall in Westminster in London, after the publication of the Infected Blood Inquiry report, Monday May 20, 2024. British authorities and the country's public health service knowingly exposed tens of thousands of patients to deadly infections through contaminated blood and blood products, and hid the truth about the disaster for decades, an inquiry into the U.K.’s infected blood scandal found Monday. (Jeff Moore/PA via AP)

People carry pictures of relatives as they gather outside Central Hall in Westminster in London, after the publication of the Infected Blood Inquiry report, Monday May 20, 2024. British authorities and the country's public health service knowingly exposed tens of thousands of patients to deadly infections through contaminated blood and blood products, and hid the truth about the disaster for decades, an inquiry into the U.K.’s infected blood scandal found Monday. (Jeff Moore/PA via AP)

People carry pictures of relatives as they gather outside Central Hall in Westminster in London, after the publication of the Infected Blood Inquiry report, Monday May 20, 2024. British authorities and the country's public health service knowingly exposed tens of thousands of patients to deadly infections through contaminated blood and blood products, and hid the truth about the disaster for decades, an inquiry into the U.K.’s infected blood scandal found Monday. (Jeff Moore/PA via AP)

Cressida Haughton, left, who's father Derek and Deborah Dennis who's father Dennis died, react outside Central Hall in Westminster in London, after the publication of the Infected Blood Inquiry report, Monday May 20, 2024. British authorities and the country's public health service knowingly exposed tens of thousands of patients to deadly infections through contaminated blood and blood products, and hid the truth about the disaster for decades, an inquiry into the U.K.’s infected blood scandal found Monday. (Jeff Moore/PA via AP)

Cressida Haughton, left, who's father Derek and Deborah Dennis who's father Dennis died, react outside Central Hall in Westminster in London, after the publication of the Infected Blood Inquiry report, Monday May 20, 2024. British authorities and the country's public health service knowingly exposed tens of thousands of patients to deadly infections through contaminated blood and blood products, and hid the truth about the disaster for decades, an inquiry into the U.K.’s infected blood scandal found Monday. (Jeff Moore/PA via AP)

Infected blood campaigners gather in Parliament Square, ahead of the publication of the final report into the scandal, in London, Sunday, May 19, 2024. The final report of the U.K.’s infected blood inquiry will be published Monday, six years after it started its work. The inquiry heard evidence as to how thousands of people contracted HIV or hepatitis from transfusions of tainted blood and blood products in the 1970s and 1980s. (Aaron Chown/PA via AP)

Infected blood campaigners gather in Parliament Square, ahead of the publication of the final report into the scandal, in London, Sunday, May 19, 2024. The final report of the U.K.’s infected blood inquiry will be published Monday, six years after it started its work. The inquiry heard evidence as to how thousands of people contracted HIV or hepatitis from transfusions of tainted blood and blood products in the 1970s and 1980s. (Aaron Chown/PA via AP)

Infected blood campaigners hug during a gathering at Parliament Square, ahead of the publication of the final report into the scandal, in London, Sunday, May 19, 2024. The final report of the U.K.’s infected blood inquiry will be published Monday, six years after it started its work. The inquiry heard evidence as to how thousands of people contracted HIV or hepatitis from transfusions of tainted blood and blood products in the 1970s and 1980s. (Aaron Chown/PA via AP)

Infected blood campaigners hug during a gathering at Parliament Square, ahead of the publication of the final report into the scandal, in London, Sunday, May 19, 2024. The final report of the U.K.’s infected blood inquiry will be published Monday, six years after it started its work. The inquiry heard evidence as to how thousands of people contracted HIV or hepatitis from transfusions of tainted blood and blood products in the 1970s and 1980s. (Aaron Chown/PA via AP)

Infected blood campaigners gather in Parliament Square, ahead of the publication of the final report into the scandal, in London, Sunday, May 19, 2024. The final report of the U.K.’s infected blood inquiry will be published Monday, six years after it started its work. The inquiry heard evidence as to how thousands of people contracted HIV or hepatitis from transfusions of tainted blood and blood products in the 1970s and 1980s. (Aaron Chown/PA via AP)

Infected blood campaigners gather in Parliament Square, ahead of the publication of the final report into the scandal, in London, Sunday, May 19, 2024. The final report of the U.K.’s infected blood inquiry will be published Monday, six years after it started its work. The inquiry heard evidence as to how thousands of people contracted HIV or hepatitis from transfusions of tainted blood and blood products in the 1970s and 1980s. (Aaron Chown/PA via AP)

Infected blood campaigners react as they gather in Parliament Square, ahead of the publication of the final report into the scandal, in London, Sunday, May 19, 2024. The final report of the U.K.’s infected blood inquiry will be published Monday, six years after it started its work. The inquiry heard evidence as to how thousands of people contracted HIV or hepatitis from transfusions of tainted blood and blood products in the 1970s and 1980s. (Aaron Chown/PA via AP)

Infected blood campaigners react as they gather in Parliament Square, ahead of the publication of the final report into the scandal, in London, Sunday, May 19, 2024. The final report of the U.K.’s infected blood inquiry will be published Monday, six years after it started its work. The inquiry heard evidence as to how thousands of people contracted HIV or hepatitis from transfusions of tainted blood and blood products in the 1970s and 1980s. (Aaron Chown/PA via AP)

Next Article

No time for a Stanley Cup hangover as the NHL offseason is already here

2024-06-26 06:37 Last Updated At:06:40

The Stanley Cup was still on the ice when Patric Hornqvist offered up a sobering thought surrounded by former teammates and other family revelers holding cans of beer during the celebration.

The newly crowned champion Florida Panthers had work to do already because the offseason is already here for them and the NHL's other 31 teams.

The buyout window opens Wednesday, the draft is Friday and Saturday and the start of free agency is Monday, squeezing a flurry of activity to prepare for 2024-25 into a tight window.

“It’s crazy,” said Hornqvist, a two-time Cup-winning player who's now in Florida's front office. “A quick turnaround.”

The season stretching into summer and the final between the Panthers and Edmonton Oilers going the distance to Game 7 set up this quick turnaround.

Less than 12 hours after the Cup was awarded, Colorado re-signed forward Casey Mittelstadt for three more years and Winnipeg extended defenseman Dylan DeMelo.

Some teams did not wait to take care of business. Boston and Ottawa made a major goalie trade finalized Monday night sending 2023 Vezina Trophy winner Linus Ullmark to the Senators for Joonas Korpisalo, depth forward Mark Kastelic and a first-round pick.

The Bruins will be making that selection Friday at the Sphere in Las Vegas long after San Jose leads off the draft with the expected choice of Macklin Celebrini with the first pick. After the Sharks' trying year in the NHL basement, they are eager for the draft, trade and free agent frenzy to get underway.

“Kind of a little bit scrambling and busy time, but I think everyone’s been doing their homework and people will be prepared,” general manager Mike Grier said. "This is a rewarding week for the franchise and for our scouts, who have done a ton of work. ... It’s an exciting time. We’re looking forward to it. It’s busy, but it’s a fun time in the end.”

It should be fun for players such as 57-goal scorer Sam Reinhart, who also got the Cup clincher, and others such as Jake Guentzel and 2023 playoff MVP Jonathan Marchessault who are set to cash in as pending free agents. Less so for those on the trade market and potentially on the move, from Anaheim's Trevor Zegras to Toronto's Mitch Marner.

There are also teams with more difficult offseason tasks than others. The Oilers, fresh off losing in the final, don't even have a GM under contract beyond this week and are in danger of serious roster turnover if a handful of free agents depart.

The New York Rangers could also be active and attempting to retool after getting knocked out by the Panthers in the Eastern Conference final. They already cleared salary cap space by waiving Barclay Goodrow, who was claimed by San Jose.

Formerly the Arizona Coyotes and relocated to Salt Lake City, the Utah Hockey Club has roughly $40 million to spend to the cap under new owner Ryan Smith and his group, but don't expect a signing bonanza from GM Bill Armstrong.

“There’s a little bit of a chess game for us where we have to bring in some players, but we don’t plan on using all that money and spending right out the window and locking ourselves in for the next seven years,” Armstrong said Tuesday. “We want to be smart about how we use our money.”

The buyout window is one of the first dominos to fall, opening Wednesday to give teams the opportunity to shed unwanted contracts. The cap is also going up to $88 million, a bigger jump than expected thanks to revenue outpacing projections during a memorable season that no one has time to reflect on yet because there is so much work to be done in a short period of time.

“It happens fast,” Buffalo GM Kevyn Adams said. “You’ve got to be ready.”

AP Hockey Writer John Wawrow contributed.

AP NHL: https://apnews.com/hub/nhl

FILE - Boston Bruins goaltender Linus Ullmark (35) makes a save during Game 2 of an NHL hockey Stanley Cup first-round playoff series, April 22, 2024, in Boston. The Bruins traded 2023 Vezina Trophy winning goaltender Ullmark to the Ottawa Senators on Monday, June 24, in exchange for the Senators' 2024 first-round draft pick, forward Mark Kastelic and goaltender Joonas Korpisalo. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)

FILE - Boston Bruins goaltender Linus Ullmark (35) makes a save during Game 2 of an NHL hockey Stanley Cup first-round playoff series, April 22, 2024, in Boston. The Bruins traded 2023 Vezina Trophy winning goaltender Ullmark to the Ottawa Senators on Monday, June 24, in exchange for the Senators' 2024 first-round draft pick, forward Mark Kastelic and goaltender Joonas Korpisalo. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)

NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman, left, presents Florida Panthers forward Aleksander Barkov (16) with the NHL hockey Stanley Cup after winning the Final against the Edmonton Oilers in Sunrise, Fla., Monday, June 24, 2024. (Nathan Denette/The Canadian Press via AP)

NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman, left, presents Florida Panthers forward Aleksander Barkov (16) with the NHL hockey Stanley Cup after winning the Final against the Edmonton Oilers in Sunrise, Fla., Monday, June 24, 2024. (Nathan Denette/The Canadian Press via AP)

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