Skip to Content Facebook Feature Image

A British neonatal nurse convicted of killing 7 babies loses her bid to appeal

News

A British neonatal nurse convicted of killing 7 babies loses her bid to appeal
News

News

A British neonatal nurse convicted of killing 7 babies loses her bid to appeal

2024-05-24 18:23 Last Updated At:18:30

LONDON (AP) — A British neonatal nurse who was convicted of murdering seven babies and the attempted murder of six others has lost her bid to appeal.

Lucy Letby, 34, had asked for permission to challenge the verdict after she was convicted and sentenced to life in prison last year. A three-judge panel of Britain's Court of Appeal heard the case in April and released its decision on Friday.

“Having heard her application, we have decided to refuse leave to appeal on all grounds and refuse all associated applications,″ Judge Victoria Sharp said. “A full judgment will be handed down in due course.”

A jury at Manchester Crown Court had found her guilty of the crimes, which took place between June 2015 and June 2016 at the neonatal unit at the Countess of Chester Hospital in northwestern England.

Most defendants in British court cases don't have an automatic right to appeal. They must seek permission to appeal on a set of narrowly defined legal issues.

This undated handout issued by Cheshire Constabulary shows of nurse Lucy Letby. A British neonatal nurse who was convicted of murdering seven babies and the attempted murder of six others has lost her bid to appeal. Lucy Letby had asked for permission to challenge the verdict after she was convicted and sentenced to life in prison last year. (Cheshire Constabulary via AP)

This undated handout issued by Cheshire Constabulary shows of nurse Lucy Letby. A British neonatal nurse who was convicted of murdering seven babies and the attempted murder of six others has lost her bid to appeal. Lucy Letby had asked for permission to challenge the verdict after she was convicted and sentenced to life in prison last year. (Cheshire Constabulary via AP)

MILWAUKEE (AP) — The third day of the Republican National Convention kicks off Wednesday with Republicans — led by the newly nominated Donald Trump and JD Vance — shifting to issues of national security and foreign policy.

Republicans are expected to focus on Democratic President Joe Biden's handling of the ongoing crises in Europe and the Middle East. Former Trump administration officials are expected to take the stage to outline what foreign policy would look like in a second Trump term.

That will likely include speeches from Richard Grenell, Trump's former acting director of national intelligence, and former Secretary of State Mike Pompeo.

And Vance is expected to accept his party's nomination for vice president.

Here’s what to watch for on the third day of the RNC:

Despite his celebrity after publishing the memoir “Hillbilly Elegy,” the 39-year-old Ohio senator is unknown to many Americans — and even to many top Republicans in Milwaukee. He'll get the chance to address a national audience Wednesday.

Expect a speech that introduces his family — his wife, Usha, and their three children — and his endorsement of Trump's policies.

Vance beat out North Dakota Gov. Doug Burgum and Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida to be Trump's running mate. He has developed a strong rapport with the former president over the years, speaking on the phone regularly.

Trump has also complimented Vance’s beard, saying he “looks like a young Abraham Lincoln."

Former Trump White House official Peter Navarro was released from prison in Florida on Wednesday and is expected to speak hours later at the Republican National Convention.

Navarro, who was a Trump trade adviser, was released from custody after completing his four-month sentence for refusing to cooperate with a congressional investigation into the Jan. 6, 2021, attack on the U.S. Capitol by a mob of Trump supporters, according to the federal Bureau of Prisons.

Navarro will head straight to Milwaukee to speak at the third night of the RNC. He is set to speak in the 6 p.m. hour Central time, according to a person familiar with the schedule who spoke on the condition of anonymity before the schedule’s official release.

Many of the speeches Wednesday will take aim at the Biden administration's handling of global issues, including the chaotic U.S. withdrawal from Afghanistan and the ongoing Israel-Hamas war, according to Trump’s campaign and the Republican National Committee, with the theme of “Make America Strong Once Again.”

“Under Joe Biden, the weakest commander-in-chief in our country’s history, America has become a global laughingstock,” the committee put out in an advance release.

Republicans see foreign policy as one of their strongest campaign issues, arguing that America's standing on the world stage was stronger under Trump despite the party's growing isolationist shift.

“I can tell you, countries around the world, leaders, are absolutely uncomfortable with the unpredictability of Donald Trump," Grenell, Trump’s former ambassador to Germany, said during a reporters' roundtable Monday. “And when I say uncomfortable, that means they don’t know exactly what he’s going to do next. And that’s a positive for us.”

It is an argument he will likely make again Wednesday night.

While the focus of Wednesday's session is expected to be beyond America's borders, Republicans are expected to also highlight how Biden's supposed “weakness” on immigration is also endangering our reputation abroad. Many speakers have already documented claims that a growing number of foreign terrorists have been able to illegally get into the U.S. from Mexico. Republicans have pointed to the arrests last month on U.S. soil of eight people from Tajikistan with suspected ties to the Islamic State group.

Convention organizers are not expected to announce who will speak on the event’s second day until later Wednesday morning.

Associated Press writers Alanna Durkin Richer and Jill Colvin contributed to this report.

Follow the AP's coverage of the 2024 election at https://apnews.com/hub/election-2024.

A supporter holds his hat during the national anthem at the Republican National Convention, Tuesday, July 16, 2024, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

A supporter holds his hat during the national anthem at the Republican National Convention, Tuesday, July 16, 2024, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

Georgia delegate Kathleen Thornman takes a picture with her phone during the Republican National Convention Tuesday, July 16, 2024, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

Georgia delegate Kathleen Thornman takes a picture with her phone during the Republican National Convention Tuesday, July 16, 2024, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

Delegates dance during the Republican National Convention, Tuesday, July 16, 2024, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Delegates dance during the Republican National Convention, Tuesday, July 16, 2024, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Former US Ambassador to Germany Richard Grenell is seen during a walkthrough for the Republican National Convention Sunday, July 14, 2024, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Former US Ambassador to Germany Richard Grenell is seen during a walkthrough for the Republican National Convention Sunday, July 14, 2024, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Texas delegates cheer during the Republican National Convention, Tuesday, July 16, 2024, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

Texas delegates cheer during the Republican National Convention, Tuesday, July 16, 2024, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

Recommended Articles