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Djokovic loses Geneva semi and goes to French Open with no titles in 2024

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Djokovic loses Geneva semi and goes to French Open with no titles in 2024
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Djokovic loses Geneva semi and goes to French Open with no titles in 2024

2024-05-25 02:43 Last Updated At:02:51

GENEVA (AP) — Novak Djokovic will defend his French Open title in Paris still without a trophy this season after losing in the Geneva Open semifinals on Friday.

The 44th-ranked Tomas Machac beat Djokovic 6-4, 0-6, 6-1 in the last clay-court event to prepare for Roland Garros, where main draw play starts on Sunday.

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Novak Djokovic, right, of Serbia, congratulates the match winner Tomas Machac, left, of the Czech Republic, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

GENEVA (AP) — Novak Djokovic will defend his French Open title in Paris still without a trophy this season after losing in the Geneva Open semifinals on Friday.

Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, returns a ball to Tomas Machac, of the Czech Republic, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, returns a ball to Tomas Machac, of the Czech Republic, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, wipe your eyes as he plays Tomas Machac, of the Czech Republic, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, wipe your eyes as he plays Tomas Machac, of the Czech Republic, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

Tomas Machac, of the Czech Republic, reacts after winning a game against Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

Tomas Machac, of the Czech Republic, reacts after winning a game against Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, returns a ball to Tomas Machac, of the Czech Republic, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, returns a ball to Tomas Machac, of the Czech Republic, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, returns a ball to Tomas Machac, of the Czech Republic, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, returns a ball to Tomas Machac, of the Czech Republic, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

Tomas Machac, of the Czech Republic, returns a ball to Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

Tomas Machac, of the Czech Republic, returns a ball to Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, reacts after losing a game against Tomas Machac, of the Czech Republic, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, reacts after losing a game against Tomas Machac, of the Czech Republic, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, reacts after losing a point as he plays Tomas Machac, of the Czech Republic, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, reacts after losing a point as he plays Tomas Machac, of the Czech Republic, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

“Of course I am worried. I haven’t been playing good at all this year,” Djokovic said.

His record in 2024 dropped to 14-6 overall and 0-3 in semifinals, including at the Australian Open against Jannik Sinner.

"I don’t consider myself a favorite there," the top-ranked Serb said of his chances at Roland Garros, where he's won two of the past three titles and three overall among his men's record 24 Grand Slam singles titles. "I’m going to take it match by match and see how far I can go.”

Machac took his first match-point chance which came on Djokovic’s serve, and clinched when Djokovic pushed a backhand long.

It was the fifth time Djokovic had his service broken and he also made 27 unforced errors.

“If you play against Novak you just hope and try to play your best and see how it looks,” Machac said in an on-court interview.

Djokovic warmly greeted the Czech at the net, and smiled as he walked off court, applauding the fans.

Djokovic took a medical timeout after the first set for a stomach issue.

“It was a terrible feeling with stomach and health today. It was not a great night and today as well," he said. “I don’t want to take anything away from his win, he deserved it."

Machac will play his first tour final on Saturday against two-time Geneva champion Casper Ruud, the French Open runner-up for the past two years, or the unseeded Flavio Cobolli. Their semifinal did not start on time because of a lengthy rain delay.

AP tennis: https://apnews.com/hub/tennis

Novak Djokovic, right, of Serbia, congratulates the match winner Tomas Machac, left, of the Czech Republic, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

Novak Djokovic, right, of Serbia, congratulates the match winner Tomas Machac, left, of the Czech Republic, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, returns a ball to Tomas Machac, of the Czech Republic, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, returns a ball to Tomas Machac, of the Czech Republic, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, wipe your eyes as he plays Tomas Machac, of the Czech Republic, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, wipe your eyes as he plays Tomas Machac, of the Czech Republic, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

Tomas Machac, of the Czech Republic, reacts after winning a game against Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

Tomas Machac, of the Czech Republic, reacts after winning a game against Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, returns a ball to Tomas Machac, of the Czech Republic, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, returns a ball to Tomas Machac, of the Czech Republic, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, returns a ball to Tomas Machac, of the Czech Republic, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, returns a ball to Tomas Machac, of the Czech Republic, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

Tomas Machac, of the Czech Republic, returns a ball to Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

Tomas Machac, of the Czech Republic, returns a ball to Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, reacts after losing a game against Tomas Machac, of the Czech Republic, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, reacts after losing a game against Tomas Machac, of the Czech Republic, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, reacts after losing a point as he plays Tomas Machac, of the Czech Republic, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

Novak Djokovic, of Serbia, reacts after losing a point as he plays Tomas Machac, of the Czech Republic, during their semi-final match, at the ATP 250 Geneva Open tennis tournament in Geneva, Switzerland, Friday, May 24, 2024. (Martial Trezzini/Keystone via AP)

HILVERSUM, Netherlands (AP) — Quinn Schansman dreamed of becoming the youngest-ever CEO of an American company. A decade ago, he'd just finished the first year of an international business degree in Amsterdam as a step toward that lofty goal.

But the 18-year-old dual Dutch American citizen's future — whatever it may have held — was cruelly cut short when he was one of the 298 people killed as a Soviet-era Buk surface-to-air rocket, launched from territory in eastern Ukraine controlled by pro-Russian rebels, destroyed Malaysia Airlines flight 17.

The conflict in Ukraine has since erupted into full-scale war following Russia's invasion in February 2022.

On Wednesday, Quinn's father, Thomas Schansman, will read out his name and those of other victims during a commemoration marking 10 years since the tragedy at a monument near Schiphol, the airport flight MH17 left on its way to Kuala Lumpur on July 17, 2014.

Schansman has learned to live with the loss of his son, but what he still can't accept is Moscow's blunt denials of responsibility for the downing of the Boeing 777, which shattered in midair and scattered bodies and wreckage over agricultural land and fields of sunflowers in eastern Ukraine.

An international investigation concluded that the Buk missile system belonged to the Russian 53rd Anti-Aircraft Missile Brigade and that it was driven into Ukraine from a Russian military base near the city of Kursk and returned there after the plane was shot down.

In 2022, after a trial that lasted more than two years, a Dutch court convicted two Russians and a pro-Russian Ukrainian in absentia of murder for their roles in transporting the missile. They were given life prison sentences but remain at large because Russia refused to surrender them to face trial. One other Russian was acquitted.

Russia steadfastly denies any responsibility.

More legal action is underway at the European Court of Human Rights and the International Civil Aviation Organization Council to hold Russia to account under international law for the attack.

If those organizations rule that Moscow was responsible, Schansman says it will be a moment to celebrate — but it wouldn't be the end of the story.

“That does not provide closure. For me, closure is the acknowledgment by Russia that they delivered the Buk, the recognition that they must also take responsibility for it," Schansman told The Associated Press. "I want to hear apologies. The simple ‘Sorry.’”

People killed in the crash were citizens of the Netherlands, Malaysia, Australia, Indonesia, the United Kingdom, Belgium, Germany, the Philippines, Canada, New Zealand, Vietnam, Israel, Italy, Romania, the United States and South Africa.

Australian Attorney General Mark Dreyfus will also be in the Netherlands for the commemoration. He honored families of the dead in a statement earlier this month, saying that 38 of the victims “called Australia home.”

“I pay tribute to their bravery, their strength and their perseverance. Seeking justice for those aboard flight MH17 has required many of those who loved them most to tell and re-tell their stories of loss in successive legal proceedings,” he said.

Dreyfus said the anniversary and a commemoration at Parliament House in Canberra would be “a moment to pause and remember those whose lives were tragically cut short in a senseless act of violence. It will be a moment to commit ourselves to continue to seek accountability for those responsible for this despicable crime.”

Schansman said he no longer cares if other people who were involved in firing the missile are brought to justice because “it won't bring my son back.”

He just wants Russia to admit responsibility.

“The fact that for all these years — right up to today — they continue to deny and to spread disinformation, that hurts," Schansman said. "That is irritating and it makes you at certain times a bitter person.”

Mark Rutte, the former Dutch prime minister who was in office when the Boeing 777 was shot down, said the disaster and its decade-long aftermath was “perhaps the most drastic and emotional event of my entire premiership. I have always tried to be a support to the relatives.”

Rutte's administration helped coordinate a complex operation to repatriate the remains of the victims to the Netherlands. Thousands of people solemnly lined highways as convoys of hearses carried coffins from a military airbase to a barracks where the painstaking process of identification took place.

Wednesday's ceremony will be held at the national MH17 memorial, a park near Schiphol Airport that is planted with 298 trees — one for each victim — and sunflowers, reflecting the flowers that grew at the crash scene.

And while Wednesday will mark the 10th anniversary of Quinn's death, his name lives on. His sister Nerissa recently gave birth to her first daughter, named Frida Quinn Schansman Pouw.

FILE - People who lost relatives in the downing of MH17, hug at a bus stop after the court's verdict at Schiphol airport, near Amsterdam, Netherlands, on Nov. 17, 2022. 298 people were killed as a Soviet-era Buk surface-to-air rocket launched from territory in eastern Ukraine controlled by pro-Russian rebels destroyed Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17. A 10-year commemoration ceremony at a monument near Schiphol, the airport the doomed flight left on its way to Kuala Lumpur will be held on July 17, 2014. (AP Photo/Phil Nijhuis, File)

FILE - People who lost relatives in the downing of MH17, hug at a bus stop after the court's verdict at Schiphol airport, near Amsterdam, Netherlands, on Nov. 17, 2022. 298 people were killed as a Soviet-era Buk surface-to-air rocket launched from territory in eastern Ukraine controlled by pro-Russian rebels destroyed Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17. A 10-year commemoration ceremony at a monument near Schiphol, the airport the doomed flight left on its way to Kuala Lumpur will be held on July 17, 2014. (AP Photo/Phil Nijhuis, File)

Thomas Schansman poses at his home near a drawing of his son, Quinn, in the central Dutch city of Hilversum, Netherlands, Thursday, July 11, 2024. Quinn Schansman dreamed of becoming the youngest ever CEO of an American company. But the 18-year-old dual Dutch-American citizen's future — whatever it may have held — was cruelly cut short when he was one of the 298 people killed as a Soviet-era Buk surface-to-air rocket launched from territory in eastern Ukraine controlled by pro-Russian rebels destroyed Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17. (AP Photo/Michael Corder)

Thomas Schansman poses at his home near a drawing of his son, Quinn, in the central Dutch city of Hilversum, Netherlands, Thursday, July 11, 2024. Quinn Schansman dreamed of becoming the youngest ever CEO of an American company. But the 18-year-old dual Dutch-American citizen's future — whatever it may have held — was cruelly cut short when he was one of the 298 people killed as a Soviet-era Buk surface-to-air rocket launched from territory in eastern Ukraine controlled by pro-Russian rebels destroyed Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17. (AP Photo/Michael Corder)

FILE - Relatives walk along 298 empty chairs, each chair for one of the 298 victims of the downed Malaysia Air flight MH17, are placed in a park opposite the Russian embassy in The Hague, Netherlands, on March 8, 2020. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, File)

FILE - Relatives walk along 298 empty chairs, each chair for one of the 298 victims of the downed Malaysia Air flight MH17, are placed in a park opposite the Russian embassy in The Hague, Netherlands, on March 8, 2020. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, File)

FILE - Dutch military police stand next to parts of the wreckage of the Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, displayed in a hangar at Gilze-Rijen airbase, Netherlands, on March 3, 2015. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, File)

FILE - Dutch military police stand next to parts of the wreckage of the Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, displayed in a hangar at Gilze-Rijen airbase, Netherlands, on March 3, 2015. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, File)

FILE - Ukrainian Emergency workers carry a victim's body in a body bag as pro-Russian fighters stand guard at the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 near the village of Hrabove, eastern Ukraine, on July 20, 2014. 298 people were killed as a Soviet-era Buk surface-to-air rocket launched from territory in eastern Ukraine controlled by pro-Russian rebels destroyed Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17. A 10-year commemoration ceremony at a monument near Schiphol, the airport the doomed flight left on its way to Kuala Lumpur will be held on July 17, 2014. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka, File)

FILE - Ukrainian Emergency workers carry a victim's body in a body bag as pro-Russian fighters stand guard at the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17 near the village of Hrabove, eastern Ukraine, on July 20, 2014. 298 people were killed as a Soviet-era Buk surface-to-air rocket launched from territory in eastern Ukraine controlled by pro-Russian rebels destroyed Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17. A 10-year commemoration ceremony at a monument near Schiphol, the airport the doomed flight left on its way to Kuala Lumpur will be held on July 17, 2014. (AP Photo/Evgeniy Maloletka, File)

FILE - A pro-Russian rebel touches the MH17 wreckage at the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, near the village of Hrabove, eastern Ukraine, on July 22, 2014. 298 people were killed as a Soviet-era Buk surface-to-air rocket launched from territory in eastern Ukraine controlled by pro-Russian rebels destroyed Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17. A 10-year commemoration ceremony at a monument near Schiphol, the airport the doomed flight left on its way to Kuala Lumpur will be held on July 17, 2014. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)

FILE - A pro-Russian rebel touches the MH17 wreckage at the crash site of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17, near the village of Hrabove, eastern Ukraine, on July 22, 2014. 298 people were killed as a Soviet-era Buk surface-to-air rocket launched from territory in eastern Ukraine controlled by pro-Russian rebels destroyed Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17. A 10-year commemoration ceremony at a monument near Schiphol, the airport the doomed flight left on its way to Kuala Lumpur will be held on July 17, 2014. (AP Photo/Vadim Ghirda, File)

FILE - People walk amongst the debris at the crash site of a passenger plane near the village of Grabovo, Ukraine, on July 17, 2014. 298 people were killed as a Soviet-era Buk surface-to-air rocket launched from territory in eastern Ukraine controlled by pro-Russian rebels destroyed Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17. A 10-year commemoration ceremony at a monument near Schiphol, the airport the doomed flight left on its way to Kuala Lumpur will be held on July 17, 2014. (AP Photo/Dmitry Lovetsky, File)

FILE - People walk amongst the debris at the crash site of a passenger plane near the village of Grabovo, Ukraine, on July 17, 2014. 298 people were killed as a Soviet-era Buk surface-to-air rocket launched from territory in eastern Ukraine controlled by pro-Russian rebels destroyed Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17. A 10-year commemoration ceremony at a monument near Schiphol, the airport the doomed flight left on its way to Kuala Lumpur will be held on July 17, 2014. (AP Photo/Dmitry Lovetsky, File)

FILE - The sky is reflected in the national MH17 monument which carries the names of the victims of the downed Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 in Vijfhuizen, Netherlands, on March 6, 2020. 298 people were killed as a Soviet-era Buk surface-to-air rocket launched from territory in eastern Ukraine controlled by pro-Russian rebels destroyed Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17. A 10-year commemoration ceremony at a monument near Schiphol, the airport the doomed flight left on its way to Kuala Lumpur will be held on July 17, 2014. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, File)

FILE - The sky is reflected in the national MH17 monument which carries the names of the victims of the downed Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 in Vijfhuizen, Netherlands, on March 6, 2020. 298 people were killed as a Soviet-era Buk surface-to-air rocket launched from territory in eastern Ukraine controlled by pro-Russian rebels destroyed Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17. A 10-year commemoration ceremony at a monument near Schiphol, the airport the doomed flight left on its way to Kuala Lumpur will be held on July 17, 2014. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, File)

FILE - Russia-backed separatist APC rides by an Orthodox cross with a sign reading Save and Guard, with a memorial to the victims of the Malaysian Airlines MH17 plane crash, near the village of Hrabove, eastern Ukraine, on July 16, 2015. (AP Photo/Mstyslav Chernov, File)

FILE - Russia-backed separatist APC rides by an Orthodox cross with a sign reading Save and Guard, with a memorial to the victims of the Malaysian Airlines MH17 plane crash, near the village of Hrabove, eastern Ukraine, on July 16, 2015. (AP Photo/Mstyslav Chernov, File)

FILE - Presiding judge Hendrik Steenhuis, right, and other trial judges and lawyers view the reconstructed wreckage of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17, at the Gilze-Rijen military airbase, southern , Netherlands, on May 26, 2021. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, Pool, File)

FILE - Presiding judge Hendrik Steenhuis, right, and other trial judges and lawyers view the reconstructed wreckage of Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17, at the Gilze-Rijen military airbase, southern , Netherlands, on May 26, 2021. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong, Pool, File)

Thomas Schansman poses in front of a drawing of his son, Quinn, at his home in the central Dutch city of Hilversum, Netherlands, Thursday, July 11, 2024. Quinn Schansman dreamed of becoming the youngest ever CEO of an American company. But the 18-year-old dual Dutch-American citizen's future — whatever it may have held — was cruelly cut short when he was one of the 298 people killed as a Soviet-era Buk surface-to-air rocket launched from territory in eastern Ukraine controlled by pro-Russian rebels destroyed Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17. (AP Photo/Michael Corder)

Thomas Schansman poses in front of a drawing of his son, Quinn, at his home in the central Dutch city of Hilversum, Netherlands, Thursday, July 11, 2024. Quinn Schansman dreamed of becoming the youngest ever CEO of an American company. But the 18-year-old dual Dutch-American citizen's future — whatever it may have held — was cruelly cut short when he was one of the 298 people killed as a Soviet-era Buk surface-to-air rocket launched from territory in eastern Ukraine controlled by pro-Russian rebels destroyed Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17. (AP Photo/Michael Corder)

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