Skip to Content Facebook Feature Image

Gains but no triumph for a far-right German party in local elections in an eastern state

News

Gains but no triumph for a far-right German party in local elections in an eastern state
News

News

Gains but no triumph for a far-right German party in local elections in an eastern state

2024-05-27 14:46 Last Updated At:14:50

BERLIN (AP) — The far-right Alternative for Germany made gains but failed to secure outright victories in local elections in an eastern state where the party is strong and its regional leader, one of the party's best-known figures, was recently convicted of knowingly using a Nazi slogan in a speech.

Sunday's elections at county and mayoral level in Thuringia come ahead of a state election on Sept. 1 in which Alternative for Germany's local leader, Björn Höcke, plans to run for the governor’s job.

Official results with about four-fifths of districts counted on Monday showed Alternative for Germany, or AfD, gaining nearly nine points compared with 2019 to take some 26% of the vote across the state in elections for councilors. However, it remained a little behind the center-right Christian Democratic Union, Germany's main national opposition party, whose support was more or less unchanged.

Nine AfD candidates either qualified for runoff votes on June 9 or appeared set to, largely against CDU rivals, though there was only one county where the far-right party enjoyed a small lead going into the runoff vote for head of the local administration.

Thuringia is the state where AfD won its first county leadership post, nearly a year ago.

Observers suspect AfD is likely to lose the runoff votes as mainstream parties' supporters give their votes to its rivals. While it has built a strong core of support, AfD has had a turbulent few weeks, partly a result of scandals surrounding its lead candidate for next month's European Parliament election.

Earlier this month, a court ruled that Höcke, an influential figure on the party's hard right, knowingly used a Nazi slogan in a 2021 speech and ordered him to pay a fine totaling 13,000 euros (about $14,100). His lawyers are appealing.

Voters sit behind polling booths at a polling station set for Thuringia local elections in Gera, Germany Sunday, May 26, 2024. The local elections in Thuringia include elections for mayors, district councillors, city councillors and municipal councillors. (Heiko Rebsch/dpa via AP)

Voters sit behind polling booths at a polling station set for Thuringia local elections in Gera, Germany Sunday, May 26, 2024. The local elections in Thuringia include elections for mayors, district councillors, city councillors and municipal councillors. (Heiko Rebsch/dpa via AP)

Julian Vonarb, Lord Mayor of Gera, comes to cast his vote for Thuringia local elections, at a polling station in Gera, germany, Sunday, May 26, 2024. (Heiko Rebsch/dpa via AP)

Julian Vonarb, Lord Mayor of Gera, comes to cast his vote for Thuringia local elections, at a polling station in Gera, germany, Sunday, May 26, 2024. (Heiko Rebsch/dpa via AP)

Next Article

Supreme Court upholds a tax on foreign income over a business-backed challenge

2024-06-20 22:07 Last Updated At:22:11

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Thursday upheld a tax on foreign income over a challenge backed by business and anti-regulatory interests, declining their invitation to weigh in on a broader, never-enacted tax on wealth.

The justices left in place a provision of a 2017 tax law that is expected to generate $340 billion, mainly from the foreign subsidiaries of domestic corporations that parked money abroad to shield it from U.S. taxes.

The law, passed by a Republican Congress and signed by then-President Donald Trump, includes a provision that applies to companies that are owned by Americans but do their business in foreign countries. It imposes a one-time tax on investors’ shares of profits that have not been passed along to them, to offset other tax benefits.

But the larger significance of the ruling is what it didn't do. The case attracted outsize attention because some groups allied with the Washington couple who brought the case argued that the challenged provision is similar to a wealth tax, which would apply not to the incomes of the very richest Americans but to their assets, like stock holdings, that now get taxed only when they are sold.

The court ruled in the case of Charles and Kathleen Moore, of Redmond, Washington. They challenged a $15,000 tax bill based on Charles Moore’s investment in an Indian company, arguing that the tax violates the 16th Amendment. Ratified in 1913, the amendment allows the federal government to impose an income tax on Americans. Moore said in a sworn statement that he never received any money from the company, KisanKraft Machine Tools Private Ltd.

A ruling for the Moores could have called into question other provisions of the tax code and threatened losses to the U.S. Treasury of several trillion dollars, the Biden administration told the court.

The case also had kicked up ethical concerns and raised questions about the story the Moores’ lawyers told in court filings. Justice Samuel Alito rejected calls from Senate Democrats to step away from the case because of his ties to David Rivkin, a lawyer who is representing the Moores.

Public documents show that Charles Moore’s involvement with the company, including serving as a director for five years, is far more extensive than court filings indicate.

The case is Moore v. U.S., 22-800.

Follow the AP's coverage of the U.S. Supreme Court at https://apnews.com/hub/us-supreme-court.

The U.S Supreme Court is seen on Friday, June 14, 2024, in Washington. (AP Photo/Mariam Zuhaib)

The U.S Supreme Court is seen on Friday, June 14, 2024, in Washington. (AP Photo/Mariam Zuhaib)

Visitors pose for photographs outside the U.S. Supreme Court Tuesday, June 18, 2024, in Washington. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Visitors pose for photographs outside the U.S. Supreme Court Tuesday, June 18, 2024, in Washington. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Visitors pose for photographs outside the U.S. Supreme Court Tuesday, June 18, 2024, in Washington. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Visitors pose for photographs outside the U.S. Supreme Court Tuesday, June 18, 2024, in Washington. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Visitors pose for photographs at the U.S. Supreme Court Tuesday, June 18, 2024, in Washington. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Visitors pose for photographs at the U.S. Supreme Court Tuesday, June 18, 2024, in Washington. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Visitors pose for photographs outside the U.S. Supreme Court Tuesday, June 18, 2024, in Washington. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Visitors pose for photographs outside the U.S. Supreme Court Tuesday, June 18, 2024, in Washington. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Recommended Articles