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Best-Selling Cessna Citation Latitude and Flagship Citation Longitude to Offer New Advanced Avionics Features

News

Best-Selling Cessna Citation Latitude and Flagship Citation Longitude to Offer New Advanced Avionics Features
News

News

Best-Selling Cessna Citation Latitude and Flagship Citation Longitude to Offer New Advanced Avionics Features

2024-05-27 16:02 Last Updated At:16:10

WICHITA, Kan.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--May 27, 2024--

Textron Aviation today announced advanced Garmin G5000 avionics enhancements coming to the best-selling mid-size business jet, the Cessna Citation Latitude, and the flagship of the Citation family of jets, the Citation Longitude. Textron Aviation’s investments in the popular business jets, based on customer feedback, will offer greater performance and improved user experience to pilots in the new Latitude jets beginning in 2025 and the new Longitude jets in 2026.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20240527032307/en/

The Cessna Citation Latitude and Cessna Citation Longitude are designed and manufactured by Textron Aviation Inc., a Textron Inc. (NYSE:TXT) company.

"Citation jets offer customers performance, productivity and profitability that opens a new world of possibility in aviation and their business,” said Lannie O'Bannion, senior vice president of Global Sales & Flight Operations. "These enhancements demonstrate our commitment to continuously invest in our legendary products in order to design and deliver the best aviation experience for our customers.”

When equipped with the latest Garmin G5000 avionics suite, the Latitude and Longitude will feature an array of new advanced features and technology from Garmin, including Synthetic Vision Guidance System (SVGS) shown on the primary flight displays, that couples with Synthetic Vision Technology (SVT) to support approach minima as low as 150 ft (46 m). SVGS provides a continuous, geo-spatially correct depiction of the external scene topography, including obstacles, augmented by the display of the runway.

SVT enhancements include a 3D exocentric view of the SafeTaxi® airport environment to aid situational awareness while taxiing. SVT also displays 3D building footprints including hangars, terminals and towers, taxiways, aprons, signs and other markings to help reduce runway incursions by providing guidance while taxiing at airports contained in the SafeTaxi database. The enhancements also support pilot situational awareness by increasing topographical clarity, sharpening water and terrain boundaries, improving obstacle and powerlines display and enhancing runway and airport sign depictions. SVT introduces multiple viewpoints for the first time and integrates with the new Taxiway Routing feature that provides clarity during ground operations – particularly at large, unfamiliar and complex airports during low visibility conditions.

The Latitude and Longitude can utilize the standard ADS-B In capability for Cockpit Display of Traffic Information (CDTI) Assisted Visual Separation (CAVS). CAVS increases pilots’ traffic awareness and assists pilots in maintaining separation from preceding aircraft equipped with ADS-B out during visual approaches to landing. SURF IA also utilizes ADS-B data to provide alerts when attempting a takeoff or landing on an occupied runway.

For qualifying regions, the GDL 60 Datalink offers high-bandwidth data exchange and connectivity options, including Bluetooth, Wi-Fi and LTE networks. The GDL 60 features the ability to complete automatic wireless database downloads over network connections while the aircraft is powered off. Additionally, enhancements to the GDL 69A allow the Garmin G5000 suite to access more SiriusXM Weather products.

Cessna Citation jets are versatile and reliable business tools that enable customers to fulfil a wide range of missions. The Citation Latitude has been the world’s most-delivered midsize business jet for eight consecutive years and has proved a hit with customers due to its reliability, versatility and impressive range. The Citation Longitude is equally designed around the pilot experience, passenger comfort and overall performance, delivering an aircraft that lives up to its designation as the flagship of the Citation family of business jets.

About the Cessna Citation Latitude

The Citation Latitude midsize business jet, with a four-passenger range of 2,700 nautical miles (5,000 km) at high-speed cruise, is set apart from the competition by its combination of comfort and efficiency. The aircraft’s class-leading take-off field length of 3,580 feet provides operators with greater range out of short fields. Inside, the Citation Latitude offers an unrivaled cabin experience featuring the most open, spacious, bright and refined cabin environment in its category. With a flat floor and six feet of cabin height, innovation abounds with exceptional features designed throughout the aircraft.

About the Citation Longitude

With a range of 3,500 nautical miles (6,482 kilometers) and full fuel payload of 1,600 pounds (726 kilograms), the Citation Longitude elevates passenger experience in the super-midsize class by delivering cabin sound levels that are nearly twice as quiet as the nearest competitor, a low cabin altitude (5,950 feet/1,814 meters), more standard features and an elegant yet comfortable, bespoke interior. No other super-midsize business jet offers more range, greater payload or higher cruise speed at a lower direct operating cost.

About Textron Aviation

We inspire the journey of flight. For more than 95 years, Textron Aviation Inc., a Textron Inc. company, has empowered our collective talent across the Beechcraft, Cessna and Hawker brands to design and deliver the best aviation experience for our customers. With a range that includes everything from business jets, turboprops, and high-performance pistons, to special mission, military trainer and defense products, Textron Aviation has the most versatile and comprehensive aviation product portfolio in the world and a workforce that has produced more than half of all general aviation aircraft worldwide. Customers in more than 170 countries rely on our legendary performance, reliability and versatility, along with our trusted global customer service network, for affordable and flexible flight.

For more information, visit www.txtav.com | www.defense.txtav.com | www.scorpionjet.com.

About Textron Inc.

Textron Inc. is a multi-industry company that leverages its global network of aircraft, defense, industrial and finance businesses to provide customers with innovative solutions and services. Textron is known around the world for its powerful brands such as Bell, Cessna, Beechcraft, Pipistrel, Jacobsen, Kautex, Lycoming, E-Z-GO, Arctic Cat, Textron Systems, and TRU Simulation. For more information, visit: www.textron.com

Certain statements in this press release are forward-looking statements which may project revenues or describe strategies, goals, outlook or other non-historical matters; these statements speak only as of the date on which they are made, and we undertake no obligation to update or revise any forward-looking statements. These statements are subject to known and unknown risks, uncertainties, and other factors that may cause our actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements.

Textron Aviation | Cessna Citation Jets (Photo: Business Wire)

Textron Aviation | Cessna Citation Jets (Photo: Business Wire)

MIAMI (AP) — Tropical Storm Alberto formed on Wednesday in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season.

Alberto was located 185 miles (about 300 kilometers) east of Tampico, Mexico and 295 miles (about 480 kilometers) south-southeast of Brownsville, Texas. It had top sustained winds of 40 mph (65 kph), according to the National Hurricane Center in Miami. A tropical storm is defined by sustained winds of between 39 and 73 mph (62 and 117 kph), and above that the system becomes a hurricane.

The storm was moving west at 9 mph (15 kph). Tropical storm warnings were in effect from the Texas coast at San Luis Pass southward to the mouth of the Rio Grande and from the northeastern coast of Mexico south of the mouth of the Rio Grande to Tecolutla. Some slight strengthening is forecast for Wednesday before the center of Alberto reaches land on Thursday, the center said.

“Rapid weakening is expected once the center moves inland, and Alberto is likely to dissipate over Mexico” on Thursday, the center said.

The storm is expected to produce rainfall totals of 5 to 10 inches (about 13 to 25 centimeters) across northeast Mexico into South Texas. Maximum totals around 20 inches (51 centimeters) are possible across the higher terrain of the Mexican states of Coahuila, Nuevo Leon, and Tamaulipas. Flash flooding is likely, and mudslides are possible in some areas, the center said.

The U.S. National Weather Service said the main hazard for southern coastal Texas is flooding from excess rain. Eight inches (20 centimeters) of rain or more could fall by Saturday morning. On Wednesday, the NWS said, there is “a high probability” of flash flooding in southern coastal Texas. Tornadoes or waterspouts are possible.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration predicts the hurricane season that began June 1 and runs through Nov. 30 is likely to be well above average, with between 17 and 25 named storms. The forecast calls for as many as 13 hurricanes and four major hurricanes.

An average Atlantic hurricane season produces 14 named storms, seven of them hurricanes and three major hurricanes.

A no-name storm earlier in June dumped more than 20 inches (50 centimeters) of rain on parts of South Florida, stranding numerous motorists on flooded streets and pushing water into some homes in low-lying areas.

Roy Quiroz looks back at his wife, Minda, as he crossed a flooded section of Kempner Street, Wednesday, June 19, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Roy Quiroz looks back at his wife, Minda, as he crossed a flooded section of Kempner Street, Wednesday, June 19, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Richard Tumlinson watches waves crash along the seawall as he passes the 1900 storm memorial while rain rollsl in, Wednesday, June 18, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. The statue honors the more than 8,000 people killed in the hurricane called "The Great Storm" in 1900. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Richard Tumlinson watches waves crash along the seawall as he passes the 1900 storm memorial while rain rollsl in, Wednesday, June 18, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. The statue honors the more than 8,000 people killed in the hurricane called "The Great Storm" in 1900. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Waves crash over a jetty along Seawall Boulevard Wednesday, June 18, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Waves crash over a jetty along Seawall Boulevard Wednesday, June 18, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Jeremy Reddout and his daughter, Elexus, enjoy the waves between Murdoch's and Pleasure Pier as rain falls, Wednesday, June 19, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Jeremy Reddout and his daughter, Elexus, enjoy the waves between Murdoch's and Pleasure Pier as rain falls, Wednesday, June 19, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Megan Johnston sits on the seawall along Seawall Boulevard as rain falls, Wednesday, June 18, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Megan Johnston sits on the seawall along Seawall Boulevard as rain falls, Wednesday, June 18, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Galveston city worker Sean Kirby checks trash cans along Seawall Boulevard as rain falls,Wednesday, June 18, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Galveston city worker Sean Kirby checks trash cans along Seawall Boulevard as rain falls,Wednesday, June 18, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Roy Quiroz and his wife, Minda, brace themselves with their umbrella as strong winds kick up as they cross a flooded section of The Strand near Kempner Street , Wednesday, June 19, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Roy Quiroz and his wife, Minda, brace themselves with their umbrella as strong winds kick up as they cross a flooded section of The Strand near Kempner Street , Wednesday, June 19, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Galveston city worker Sean Kirby checks trash cans along Seawall Boulevard as rain falls Wednesday, June 18, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Galveston city worker Sean Kirby checks trash cans along Seawall Boulevard as rain falls Wednesday, June 18, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Roy Quiroz and his wife, Minda, cross a flooded section of The Strand near Kempner Street as rain falls Wednesday, June 19, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Roy Quiroz and his wife, Minda, cross a flooded section of The Strand near Kempner Street as rain falls Wednesday, June 19, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Elexus Reddout and her father, Jeremy, enjoy the waves between Murdoch's and Pleasure Pier Wednesday, June 19, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

Elexus Reddout and her father, Jeremy, enjoy the waves between Murdoch's and Pleasure Pier Wednesday, June 19, 2024, in Galveston, Texas. Tropical Storm Alberto has formed in the southwestern Gulf of Mexico, the first named storm of what is forecast to be a busy hurricane season. (Jason Fochtman/Houston Chronicle via AP)

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