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The Latest | Fighting escalates in Rafah as Israel pushes ahead with its offensive

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The Latest | Fighting escalates in Rafah as Israel pushes ahead with its offensive
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The Latest | Fighting escalates in Rafah as Israel pushes ahead with its offensive

2024-05-29 08:35 Last Updated At:08:40

Palestinian residents of the southern Gaza city of Rafah have reported an escalation of fighting Tuesday as Israeli forces pressed their assault on the border town once seen as the territory's last refuge.

Israel says it is carrying out limited operations in eastern Rafah along the Gaza-Egypt border, as the United States and other allies of Israel have warned against a full-fledged offensive in the city.

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Palestinians fleeing from the southern Gaza city of Rafah during an Israeli ground and air offensive in the city on Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Abdel Kareem Hana)

Palestinian residents of the southern Gaza city of Rafah have reported an escalation of fighting Tuesday as Israeli forces pressed their assault on the border town once seen as the territory's last refuge.

Smoke billows after an explosion in the Gaza Strip, as seen from southern Israel, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)

Smoke billows after an explosion in the Gaza Strip, as seen from southern Israel, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)

An Israeli soldier moves on the top of a tank near the Israeli-Gaza border, as seen from southern Israel, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)

An Israeli soldier moves on the top of a tank near the Israeli-Gaza border, as seen from southern Israel, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)

People stage a Pro-Palestinians protest at the Bologna Centrale train station in Bologna, Italy, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (Michele Nucci/LaPresse via AP)

People stage a Pro-Palestinians protest at the Bologna Centrale train station in Bologna, Italy, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (Michele Nucci/LaPresse via AP)

Palestinians fleeing from the southern Gaza city of Rafah during an Israeli ground and air offensive in the city on Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Jehad Alshrafi)

Palestinians fleeing from the southern Gaza city of Rafah during an Israeli ground and air offensive in the city on Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Jehad Alshrafi)

Palestinians fleeing from the southern Gaza city of Rafah during an Israeli ground and air offensive in the city on Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Jehad Alshrafi)

Palestinians fleeing from the southern Gaza city of Rafah during an Israeli ground and air offensive in the city on Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Jehad Alshrafi)

Palestinians fleeing from the southern Gaza city of Rafah during an Israeli ground and air offensive in the city on Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Jehad Alshrafi)

Palestinians fleeing from the southern Gaza city of Rafah during an Israeli ground and air offensive in the city on Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Jehad Alshrafi)

Palestinians fleeing from the southern Gaza city of Rafah during an Israeli ground and air offensive in the city on Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Jehad Alshrafi)

Palestinians fleeing from the southern Gaza city of Rafah during an Israeli ground and air offensive in the city on Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Jehad Alshrafi)

Palestinians fleeing from the southern Gaza city of Rafah during an Israeli ground and air offensive in the city on Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Jehad Alshrafi)

Palestinians fleeing from the southern Gaza city of Rafah during an Israeli ground and air offensive in the city on Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Jehad Alshrafi)

Palestinians flee from the southern Gaza city of Rafah during an Israeli ground and air offensive in the city on Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Jehad Alshrafi)

Palestinians flee from the southern Gaza city of Rafah during an Israeli ground and air offensive in the city on Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Jehad Alshrafi)

The Palestinian flag flies outside Leinster House, Dublin, following the decision by the Government to formally recognise the Palestinian state, Tuesday May 28, 2024. (Niall Carson/PA via AP)

The Palestinian flag flies outside Leinster House, Dublin, following the decision by the Government to formally recognise the Palestinian state, Tuesday May 28, 2024. (Niall Carson/PA via AP)

A Spanish fighting bull billboard, is painted with the colours of the Palestinian flag and a writing that reads "free Palestine", on the outskirts of Madrid, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. Spain and Norway have moved to formally recognize a Palestinian state with Ireland to follow suit on Tuesday in a coordinated effort by the three western European nations. While dozens of countries have recognized a Palestinian state, none of the major Western powers has done so. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)

A Spanish fighting bull billboard, is painted with the colours of the Palestinian flag and a writing that reads "free Palestine", on the outskirts of Madrid, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. Spain and Norway have moved to formally recognize a Palestinian state with Ireland to follow suit on Tuesday in a coordinated effort by the three western European nations. While dozens of countries have recognized a Palestinian state, none of the major Western powers has done so. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)

Displaced Palestinians inspect their tents destroyed by Israel's bombardment, adjunct to an UNRWA facility west of Rafah city, Gaza Strip, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Jehad Alshrafi)

Displaced Palestinians inspect their tents destroyed by Israel's bombardment, adjunct to an UNRWA facility west of Rafah city, Gaza Strip, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Jehad Alshrafi)

Displaced Palestinians inspect their tents destroyed by Israel's bombardment, adjunct to an UNRWA facility west of Rafah city, Gaza Strip, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Jehad Alshrafi)

Displaced Palestinians inspect their tents destroyed by Israel's bombardment, adjunct to an UNRWA facility west of Rafah city, Gaza Strip, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Jehad Alshrafi)

Smoke billows after an explosion in the Gaza Strip, as seen from southern Israel, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)

Smoke billows after an explosion in the Gaza Strip, as seen from southern Israel, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)

An Israeli Apache helicopter fires a missile towards the Gaza Strip, as seen from southern Israel, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)

An Israeli Apache helicopter fires a missile towards the Gaza Strip, as seen from southern Israel, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)

Customers stand in a restaurant while Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez appears on a television broadcast in Rivas Vaciamadrid, Spain, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez says the Spanish Cabinet will recognize a Palestinian state at its Tuesday morning meeting as a European Union rift with Israel widens. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)

Customers stand in a restaurant while Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez appears on a television broadcast in Rivas Vaciamadrid, Spain, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez says the Spanish Cabinet will recognize a Palestinian state at its Tuesday morning meeting as a European Union rift with Israel widens. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)

Children light candles during a march against Israel and in solidarity with Palestinians in the southern Gaza city of Rafah, on the Mediterranean Sea corniche in Beirut, Lebanon, Monday, May 27, 2024. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu acknowledged Monday that a "tragic mistake" had been made after an Israeli strike in the southern Gaza city of Rafah set fire to a tent camp housing displaced Palestinians and killed at least 45 people, according to local officials. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar)

Children light candles during a march against Israel and in solidarity with Palestinians in the southern Gaza city of Rafah, on the Mediterranean Sea corniche in Beirut, Lebanon, Monday, May 27, 2024. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu acknowledged Monday that a "tragic mistake" had been made after an Israeli strike in the southern Gaza city of Rafah set fire to a tent camp housing displaced Palestinians and killed at least 45 people, according to local officials. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar)

Mourners shout slogans as they carry the coffins of Hezbollah commanders Hussein Youssef Salleh and Rafik Hassan Qassem, who were killed by an Israeli strike, during their funeral procession in Aita al-Shaab village, south Lebanon, Monday, May 27, 2024. (AP Photo/Mohammad Zaatari)

Mourners shout slogans as they carry the coffins of Hezbollah commanders Hussein Youssef Salleh and Rafik Hassan Qassem, who were killed by an Israeli strike, during their funeral procession in Aita al-Shaab village, south Lebanon, Monday, May 27, 2024. (AP Photo/Mohammad Zaatari)

A picture of Hezbollah leader Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah sits on a house previously destroyed in an Israeli strike, in Aita al-Shaab village, south Lebanon, Monday, May 27, 2024. The Arabic on flag reads: "Oh Hussein." (AP Photo/Mohammad Zaatari)

A picture of Hezbollah leader Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah sits on a house previously destroyed in an Israeli strike, in Aita al-Shaab village, south Lebanon, Monday, May 27, 2024. The Arabic on flag reads: "Oh Hussein." (AP Photo/Mohammad Zaatari)

Protesters clash with troops and riot police during a demonstration near the Egyptian embassy in Beirut, Lebanon, Monday, May 27, 2024, in solidarity with the Palestinian people in Gaza and demanding the Egyptian authorities open the Rafah border crossing between Egypt and the Gaza Strip. (AP Photo/Bilal Hussein)

Protesters clash with troops and riot police during a demonstration near the Egyptian embassy in Beirut, Lebanon, Monday, May 27, 2024, in solidarity with the Palestinian people in Gaza and demanding the Egyptian authorities open the Rafah border crossing between Egypt and the Gaza Strip. (AP Photo/Bilal Hussein)

Iran's acting President Mohammad Mokhber addresses during the opening ceremony of a new parliament term, in Tehran, Iran, Monday, May 27, 2024. Mokhber addressed the country's new parliament Monday in his first public speech since last week's helicopter crash that killed his predecessor and seven others. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)

Iran's acting President Mohammad Mokhber addresses during the opening ceremony of a new parliament term, in Tehran, Iran, Monday, May 27, 2024. Mokhber addressed the country's new parliament Monday in his first public speech since last week's helicopter crash that killed his predecessor and seven others. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)

A girl waves a Hezbollah flag as her brothers hold portraits of the late Iranian Revolutionary Guard Gen. Qassem Soleimani, who was killed in a U.S. drone attack in 2020 in Iraq, as the family check their house destroyed in an Israeli strike in Aita al-Shaab village, south Lebanon, Monday, May 27, 2024. (AP Photo/Mohammad Zaatari)

A girl waves a Hezbollah flag as her brothers hold portraits of the late Iranian Revolutionary Guard Gen. Qassem Soleimani, who was killed in a U.S. drone attack in 2020 in Iraq, as the family check their house destroyed in an Israeli strike in Aita al-Shaab village, south Lebanon, Monday, May 27, 2024. (AP Photo/Mohammad Zaatari)

FILE - A tent camp housing Palestinians displaced by the Israeli offensive is seen in Rafah, Gaza Strip, on Feb. 27, 2024. The tent camps stretch for more than 16 kilometers (10 miles) along Gaza’s coast, filling the beach and sprawling into empty lots, fields and town streets. (AP Photo/Hatem Ali, file)

FILE - A tent camp housing Palestinians displaced by the Israeli offensive is seen in Rafah, Gaza Strip, on Feb. 27, 2024. The tent camps stretch for more than 16 kilometers (10 miles) along Gaza’s coast, filling the beach and sprawling into empty lots, fields and town streets. (AP Photo/Hatem Ali, file)

Israeli shelling and airstrikes west of Rafah killed at least 37 people overnight and on Tuesday, most of them sheltering in tents, according to witnesses, emergency workers and hospital officials. The strikes pummeled the same area where strikes on Sunday triggered a deadly fire that engulfed tents in a camp for displaced Palestinians, killing 45 people.

Israeli leaders say their forces must enter Rafah to dismantle Hamas and return hostages taken in the Oct. 7 attack that triggered the war.

Fighting in Rafah has caused more than 1 million Palestinians to flee, most of whom had already been displaced in the war between Israel and Hamas. They now seek refuge in squalid tent camps and other war-ravaged areas, where they lack shelter, food, water and other essentials for survival, the U.N. says.

Israeli bombardments and ground offensives in Gaza have killed more than 36,000 Palestinians, according to the Health Ministry, which doesn’t distinguish between combatants and civilians.

Israel launched its war in Gaza after Hamas’ Oct. 7 attack in which militants stormed into southern Israel, killed some 1,200 people — mostly civilians — and abducted about 250. Israel says around 100 hostages are still captive in Gaza, along with the bodies of around 30 more.

Currently:

— Spain, Norway and Ireland formally recognize a Palestinian state as EU rift with Israel widens.

— Netanyahu says deadly Israeli strike in Rafah over the weekend was the result of a "tragic mishap."

— As Israel attacks Rafah, Palestinians are living in tents and scrounging for food.

— An Israeli strike in southern Lebanon kills two people near a hospital, officials say.

Follow AP’s coverage of the war in Gaza at https://apnews.com/hub/israel-hamas-war.

Here's the latest:

UNITED NATIONS — Algeria has circulated a proposed U.N. Security Council resolution demanding an immediate cease-fire in Gaza and ordering Israel to halt its military offensive in the southern city of Rafah immediately.

The draft resolution, obtained Wednesday evening by The Associated Press, also demands that the cease-fire be respected by all parties. It also calls for the immediate release of all hostages taken during Hamas’ attack in southern Israel on Oct. 7.

The draft demands compliance with previous council resolutions that call for the opening of all border crossings and humanitarian access to Gaza’s 2.3 million people who desperately need food and other aid.

The proposed resolution says that “the catastrophic situation in the Gaza Strip constitutes a threat to regional and international peace and security.”

The draft says Israel “shall immediately halt its military offensive, and any other action in Rafah.”

The draft condemns “the indiscriminate targeting of civilians, including women and children, and civilian infrastructure” and reiterates the council’s demand for all parties to comply with international law requiring the protection of civilians.

Algeria’s U.N. ambassador, Amar Bendjama, who is also the Arab representative on the Security Council, told reporters after emergency closed council consultations Tuesday that he would be sending the draft resolution to the 15-member council later in the evening.

Algeria called the emergency Security Council meeting as Israel pushed ahead with its military operation in Rafah and as fighting escalated in the border city where over a million Palestinians had sought refuge. It followed Sunday night’s Israeli airstrikes that triggered a fire engulfing tents in a camp for displaced Palestinians west of Rafah, killing 45 people and injured over 100 others.

Some diplomats said they hoped for a quick vote, even as early as Wednesday.

Chinaese Ambassador Fu Cong told reporters: “It is our hope that it can be done as quickly as possible because life is in the balance.”

U.S. Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield, said: “We’re waiting to see it and then we’ll react to it.”

The United States has vetoed multiple resolutions demanding a cease-fire in Gaza.

UNITED NATIONS – The United Nations chief says the “humanitarian catastrophe” in Gaza is risking famine and is calling on Israel to enable safe and unhindered delivery of humanitarian assistance through all crossing points.

Secretary-General Antonio Guterres notes the International Court of Justice’s recent orders to Israel to halt its offensive in Rafah and open the border crossing from Egypt for aid deliveries “which are binding and must be respected,” spokesman Stephane Dujarric said Tuesday.

He reiterated the secretary-general’s condemnation of Israel’s air strikes Sunday night that led to the killing and wounding of many Palestinians, and “as he has said before, the horror and suffering must stop immediately.”

Guterres calls for urgent efforts to prepare the Palestinian Authority to take over responsibilities for governing Gaza, Dujarric said.

“The devastation and the misery of the past seven months have reinforced the absolute need for Israelis, for Palestinians, for states of the region and the broader international community to take urgent steps that will enable the parties to re-engage on the long-delayed political path to achieve a two-state solution,” Dujarric said.

JERUSALEM — Israel’s Labor party has chosen a new leader, picking a retired military general in hopes of boosting its fortunes.

The party announced Tuesday that Yair Golan, a former deputy military chief of staff, won its primary election with over 95% of the vote. He trounced three little-known challengers.

Labor, which led the country for the first three decades of its existence, has fallen on hard times. Opinion polls indicate the party would struggle to win the minimum number of votes to enter parliament if elections were held.

In a victory speech, Golan pledged to unite Israel’s struggling political left wing to mount a challenge to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and his religious and nationalist allies.

As deputy military chief, Golan was passed over for the top job after a controversial speech in which he compared what he saw as fascistic trends in modern-day Israel to Nazi Germany. He also served briefly in parliament with the dovish Meretz party, which failed to enter parliament in the most recent election in 2022.

The retired general has gained popularity since Oct. 7, when he threw on his old uniform and rushed to southern Israel to rescue people fleeing a music festival attacked by Hamas.

WASHINGTON — A U.S. State Department spokesman expressed regret Tuesday about the fiery deaths of up to 45 displaced Palestinian civilians in an Israeli attack, but gave no indication the U.S. saw Israel as crossing any of the Biden administration’s “red lines” for the war in Gaza.

Spokesman Matthew Miller told reporters that Israel’s weeks-old offensive in the southern Gaza city of Rafah was still on a “far different” scale than the assaults Israeli forces waged on other cities in the seven-month war against Hamas in Gaza. The U.S. had urged Israel not to replicate those earlier attacks in Rafah, given the vulnerable civilians crowded there.

President Joe Biden had warned earlier this month that he might limit shipments of U.S. offensive weapons to Israel if Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu attacked the population centers of Rafah. Rafah had been a refuge for a million civilians sent fleeing by the war, although the growing offensive on that city has now sent up to a million there fleeing again.

Biden also had warned earlier that U.S. policy toward Israel would change if that country did not do more to allow humanitarian aid deliveries and otherwise ease the suffering of Gaza’s 2.3 million people.

“But is this something that we watch every day, and something that we engage with the government of Israel about every day,” Miller said. That's “as we talk to them about what their plans are and what U.S. policy might be, and as we talk to them about the need to minimize civilian harm and conduct their strikes in a way that minimizes civilian harm.”

Miller said he had no direct knowledge of reported accounts from witnesses on the ground Tuesday that Israeli tanks had entered the center of Gaza, and noted Israel had denied responsibility for a new Israeli strike outside of Rafah Tuesday that Gaza health officials said killed more than 20.

UNITED NATIONS — More than a million people have fled Gaza’s southern city of Rafah since Israel launched a military operation on May 6 and some have been displaced several times already because of Israeli bombardments, the U.N. agency helping Palestinian refugees says.

Juliette Touma, spokesperson for the agency known as UNRWA, told a U.N. press conference Tuesday that the agency's teams on the ground say heavy bombardments again took place overnight including in the area north of Rafah home to the U.N. main offices as well as UNRWA's offices. Most of its staff didn’t make it to work and were “packing and moving,” she said.

“People are absolutely terrified,” Touma said in the video briefing from Jordan. “A lot of people are fleeing to al-Muwasi and they are also fleeing to the middle areas including Deir al-Balah,” which are crowded with other displaced Palestinians.

Touma said just over 200 trucks with humanitarian supplies have been picked up for delivery to those in need in the past three weeks, which she called “a drop in the ocean amid people’s humanitarian needs.”

She said this is due to several factors: “heavy movement restrictions that the Israeli authorities continue to impose on the humanitarian community, the ongoing Israeli forces' airstrikes, and the recent expansion of the military operation in the area, and the recent launch of rockets by Hamas.”

As for fuel, Touma said every two days UNRWA picks up 100,000 liters of fuel on behalf of humanitarian organizations, which is one-third of the 300,000 liters needed every day, and that is also creating distribution problems.

MESEBERG, Germany — German Chancellor Olaf Scholz says the strike that sparked a deadly weekend fire in a tent camp in Rafah illustrates why his country and others opposed a large-scale Israeli offensive in the southern Gaza city.

Scholz said Tuesday that an investigation announced by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is “as right as it is necessary.”

At a news conference with French President Emmanuel Macron, Scholz said the conduct of the war must be in line with international law and pointed to warnings against a large-scale ground offensive in Rafah.

He said that, given the large number of refugees in Rafah, “we can’t imagine any scenario, any variation of military activity that wouldn’t come with an irresponsibly large number of civilian victims, and unfortunately we feel vindicated by the latest reports.”

Sunday’s strike caused widespread outrage, including from some of Israel’s closest allies. Netanyahu said it was the result of a “tragic mishap.”

MESEBERG, Germany — French President Emmanuel Macron said Tuesday his country is working with Algeria on “a joint resolution” on Gaza to push for a cease-fire and address the desperate need for humanitarian aid.

France is supporting the Algerian request for an emergency meeting of the U.N. Security Council over the situation in Rafah, he said.

The response to the Israel-Hamas war “can only be a political one,” Macron said. He was speaking in Meseberg, Germany, on the third day of a state visit in the country.

“We are ready to actively work at a peaceful solution, it’s reachable with political will,” Macron added.

He said French diplomats will work in the “coming hours and days” at convincing “all our partners” over the resolution proposal.

Macron reaffirmed that recognizing a Palestinian state is not a “taboo” for France yet the decision must be made “at a useful moment” and shouldn’t be an “emotional” reaction to what happened in Rafah.

Macron on Monday said on X he was “outraged by the Israeli strikes that have killed many displaced persons in Rafah.”

“These operations must stop. There are no safe areas in Rafah for Palestinian civilians. I call for full respect for international law and an immediate cease-fire,” he said.

UNITED NATIONS – The head of the United Nations agency promoting gender equality is demanding a halt to the war in Gaza, saying women and girls are suffering the most.

Sima Bahous, executive director of U.N. Women, said Tuesday more than 10,000 women have been killed in the seven months of fighting – including scores of women and children “horrifically killed” by an Israeli airstrike Monday while sleeping in tents in what was supposed to be a safe zone in Gaza’s southern city of Rafah.

Bahous told a U.N. Security Council meeting it is “for all women and girls caught in this conflict that we demand a permanent cease-fire, unhindered humanitarian access, the release of all hostages, the determined pursuit of peace, and a two-state solution.”

“This war must stop because women and girls are bearing the brunt of it,” Bahous told the meeting on the role of women and youth in promoting international peace and security.

JERUSALEM — The Israeli military says an initial investigation into a strike that sparked a deadly fire in a tent camp in the southern Gaza city of Rafah has found the blaze was caused by a secondary explosion.

Rear Adm. Daniel Hagari, the chief military spokesman, said Tuesday that the military fired two 17-kilogram (37-pound) munitions that targeted two senior Hamas militants. He said the munitions would have been too small to ignite a fire on their own and that the military is looking into the possibility that weapons were stored in the area.

The strike or subsequent fire also could have ignited fuel, cooking gas canisters or other materials in the densely populated tent camp housing displaced people.

Palestinian health officials say at least 45 people, around half of them women and children, were killed in Sunday’s strike.

The strike caused widespread outrage, including from some of Israel’s closest allies. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said it was the result of a “tragic mishap.”

DEIR AL-BALAH, Gaza Strip — Israeli strikes on Rafah have killed at least 16 Palestinians overnight, first responders said Tuesday, as residents reported an escalation of fighting in the southern Gaza city.

An Israeli incursion launched earlier this month has caused nearly 1 million to flee from Rafah, most of whom have already been displaced in the war between Israel and Hamas, and who are now seeking refuge in squalid tent camps and war-ravaged areas.

The latest strikes occurred in the same area where Israel targeted what it said was a Hamas compound on Sunday night. That strike ignited a fire in a camp for displaced Palestinians and killed at least 45 people, according to local health officials, sparking worldwide outrage.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said there was a “tragic mishap” on Sunday and the military said it was investigating.

The latest strikes killed a total of 16 people in the Tel al-Sultan neighborhood in northwest Rafah, according to the Palestinian Civil Defense and the Palestinian Red Crescent.

COPENHAGEN, Denmark — Norway on Tuesday formally recognized a Palestinian state with the Scandinavian foreign minister calling it “a milestone in the relationship between Norway and Palestine.”

Foreign Minister Espen Barth Eide said “the recognition is a strong expression of support for moderate forces in both countries.”

However, “it is regrettable that the Israeli government shows no signs of engaging constructively,” Barth Eide said. “The international community must increase its political and economic support for Palestine and continue the work for a two-state solution.”

Last week, Norway, along with Spain and Ireland, said in a coordinated effort that they were recognizing a Palestinian state.

MADRID — Spain moved to formally recognize a Palestinian state with Ireland and Norway to follow suit on Tuesday in a coordinated effort by the three western European nations. Israel slammed the diplomatic move that will have no immediate impact on its grinding war in Gaza but adds to international pressure to soften its devastating response to October’s Hamas-led attack.

Israeli Foreign Minister Israel Katz accused Spain of “being complicit in inciting genocide against Jews and war crimes” and told the country that its consulate in Jerusalem will not be allowed to help Palestinians.

Prime Minister Pedro Sánchez, who announced his country’s decision before parliament last week, has spent months touring European and Middle Eastern countries to garner support for recognition and a cease-fire in Gaza.

Relations between the EU and Israel nosedived Monday, the eve of the diplomatic recognition EU members Ireland and Spain, with Madrid insisting that sanctions should be considered against Israel for its continued deadly attacks in southern Gaza’s city of Rafah.

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates — Iran’s parliament reelected hard-liner Mohammad Bagher Qalibaf on Tuesday as its speaker, reaffirming its hard-right makeup in the wake of a helicopter crash that killed the country’s president and foreign minister.

Of 287 lawmakers voting Tuesday, 198 backed Qalibaf to retain the position he first took in 2021. He initially became speaker following a string of failed presidential bids and 12 years as the leader of Iran’s capital city. Many, however, know Qalibaf for his support as a Revolutionary Guard general for a violent crackdown on Iranian university students in 1999. He also reportedly ordered live gunfire to be used against Iranian students in 2003 while serving as the country’s police chief.

Palestinians fleeing from the southern Gaza city of Rafah during an Israeli ground and air offensive in the city on Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Abdel Kareem Hana)

Palestinians fleeing from the southern Gaza city of Rafah during an Israeli ground and air offensive in the city on Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Abdel Kareem Hana)

Smoke billows after an explosion in the Gaza Strip, as seen from southern Israel, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)

Smoke billows after an explosion in the Gaza Strip, as seen from southern Israel, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)

An Israeli soldier moves on the top of a tank near the Israeli-Gaza border, as seen from southern Israel, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)

An Israeli soldier moves on the top of a tank near the Israeli-Gaza border, as seen from southern Israel, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)

People stage a Pro-Palestinians protest at the Bologna Centrale train station in Bologna, Italy, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (Michele Nucci/LaPresse via AP)

People stage a Pro-Palestinians protest at the Bologna Centrale train station in Bologna, Italy, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (Michele Nucci/LaPresse via AP)

Palestinians fleeing from the southern Gaza city of Rafah during an Israeli ground and air offensive in the city on Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Jehad Alshrafi)

Palestinians fleeing from the southern Gaza city of Rafah during an Israeli ground and air offensive in the city on Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Jehad Alshrafi)

Palestinians fleeing from the southern Gaza city of Rafah during an Israeli ground and air offensive in the city on Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Jehad Alshrafi)

Palestinians fleeing from the southern Gaza city of Rafah during an Israeli ground and air offensive in the city on Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Jehad Alshrafi)

Palestinians fleeing from the southern Gaza city of Rafah during an Israeli ground and air offensive in the city on Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Jehad Alshrafi)

Palestinians fleeing from the southern Gaza city of Rafah during an Israeli ground and air offensive in the city on Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Jehad Alshrafi)

Palestinians fleeing from the southern Gaza city of Rafah during an Israeli ground and air offensive in the city on Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Jehad Alshrafi)

Palestinians fleeing from the southern Gaza city of Rafah during an Israeli ground and air offensive in the city on Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Jehad Alshrafi)

Palestinians fleeing from the southern Gaza city of Rafah during an Israeli ground and air offensive in the city on Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Jehad Alshrafi)

Palestinians fleeing from the southern Gaza city of Rafah during an Israeli ground and air offensive in the city on Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Jehad Alshrafi)

Palestinians flee from the southern Gaza city of Rafah during an Israeli ground and air offensive in the city on Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Jehad Alshrafi)

Palestinians flee from the southern Gaza city of Rafah during an Israeli ground and air offensive in the city on Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Jehad Alshrafi)

The Palestinian flag flies outside Leinster House, Dublin, following the decision by the Government to formally recognise the Palestinian state, Tuesday May 28, 2024. (Niall Carson/PA via AP)

The Palestinian flag flies outside Leinster House, Dublin, following the decision by the Government to formally recognise the Palestinian state, Tuesday May 28, 2024. (Niall Carson/PA via AP)

A Spanish fighting bull billboard, is painted with the colours of the Palestinian flag and a writing that reads "free Palestine", on the outskirts of Madrid, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. Spain and Norway have moved to formally recognize a Palestinian state with Ireland to follow suit on Tuesday in a coordinated effort by the three western European nations. While dozens of countries have recognized a Palestinian state, none of the major Western powers has done so. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)

A Spanish fighting bull billboard, is painted with the colours of the Palestinian flag and a writing that reads "free Palestine", on the outskirts of Madrid, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. Spain and Norway have moved to formally recognize a Palestinian state with Ireland to follow suit on Tuesday in a coordinated effort by the three western European nations. While dozens of countries have recognized a Palestinian state, none of the major Western powers has done so. (AP Photo/Bernat Armangue)

Displaced Palestinians inspect their tents destroyed by Israel's bombardment, adjunct to an UNRWA facility west of Rafah city, Gaza Strip, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Jehad Alshrafi)

Displaced Palestinians inspect their tents destroyed by Israel's bombardment, adjunct to an UNRWA facility west of Rafah city, Gaza Strip, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Jehad Alshrafi)

Displaced Palestinians inspect their tents destroyed by Israel's bombardment, adjunct to an UNRWA facility west of Rafah city, Gaza Strip, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Jehad Alshrafi)

Displaced Palestinians inspect their tents destroyed by Israel's bombardment, adjunct to an UNRWA facility west of Rafah city, Gaza Strip, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Jehad Alshrafi)

Smoke billows after an explosion in the Gaza Strip, as seen from southern Israel, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)

Smoke billows after an explosion in the Gaza Strip, as seen from southern Israel, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)

An Israeli Apache helicopter fires a missile towards the Gaza Strip, as seen from southern Israel, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)

An Israeli Apache helicopter fires a missile towards the Gaza Strip, as seen from southern Israel, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. (AP Photo/Leo Correa)

Customers stand in a restaurant while Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez appears on a television broadcast in Rivas Vaciamadrid, Spain, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez says the Spanish Cabinet will recognize a Palestinian state at its Tuesday morning meeting as a European Union rift with Israel widens. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)

Customers stand in a restaurant while Spanish Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez appears on a television broadcast in Rivas Vaciamadrid, Spain, Tuesday, May 28, 2024. Prime Minister Pedro Sanchez says the Spanish Cabinet will recognize a Palestinian state at its Tuesday morning meeting as a European Union rift with Israel widens. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)

Children light candles during a march against Israel and in solidarity with Palestinians in the southern Gaza city of Rafah, on the Mediterranean Sea corniche in Beirut, Lebanon, Monday, May 27, 2024. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu acknowledged Monday that a "tragic mistake" had been made after an Israeli strike in the southern Gaza city of Rafah set fire to a tent camp housing displaced Palestinians and killed at least 45 people, according to local officials. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar)

Children light candles during a march against Israel and in solidarity with Palestinians in the southern Gaza city of Rafah, on the Mediterranean Sea corniche in Beirut, Lebanon, Monday, May 27, 2024. Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu acknowledged Monday that a "tragic mistake" had been made after an Israeli strike in the southern Gaza city of Rafah set fire to a tent camp housing displaced Palestinians and killed at least 45 people, according to local officials. (AP Photo/Hassan Ammar)

Mourners shout slogans as they carry the coffins of Hezbollah commanders Hussein Youssef Salleh and Rafik Hassan Qassem, who were killed by an Israeli strike, during their funeral procession in Aita al-Shaab village, south Lebanon, Monday, May 27, 2024. (AP Photo/Mohammad Zaatari)

Mourners shout slogans as they carry the coffins of Hezbollah commanders Hussein Youssef Salleh and Rafik Hassan Qassem, who were killed by an Israeli strike, during their funeral procession in Aita al-Shaab village, south Lebanon, Monday, May 27, 2024. (AP Photo/Mohammad Zaatari)

A picture of Hezbollah leader Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah sits on a house previously destroyed in an Israeli strike, in Aita al-Shaab village, south Lebanon, Monday, May 27, 2024. The Arabic on flag reads: "Oh Hussein." (AP Photo/Mohammad Zaatari)

A picture of Hezbollah leader Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah sits on a house previously destroyed in an Israeli strike, in Aita al-Shaab village, south Lebanon, Monday, May 27, 2024. The Arabic on flag reads: "Oh Hussein." (AP Photo/Mohammad Zaatari)

Protesters clash with troops and riot police during a demonstration near the Egyptian embassy in Beirut, Lebanon, Monday, May 27, 2024, in solidarity with the Palestinian people in Gaza and demanding the Egyptian authorities open the Rafah border crossing between Egypt and the Gaza Strip. (AP Photo/Bilal Hussein)

Protesters clash with troops and riot police during a demonstration near the Egyptian embassy in Beirut, Lebanon, Monday, May 27, 2024, in solidarity with the Palestinian people in Gaza and demanding the Egyptian authorities open the Rafah border crossing between Egypt and the Gaza Strip. (AP Photo/Bilal Hussein)

Iran's acting President Mohammad Mokhber addresses during the opening ceremony of a new parliament term, in Tehran, Iran, Monday, May 27, 2024. Mokhber addressed the country's new parliament Monday in his first public speech since last week's helicopter crash that killed his predecessor and seven others. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)

Iran's acting President Mohammad Mokhber addresses during the opening ceremony of a new parliament term, in Tehran, Iran, Monday, May 27, 2024. Mokhber addressed the country's new parliament Monday in his first public speech since last week's helicopter crash that killed his predecessor and seven others. (AP Photo/Vahid Salemi)

A girl waves a Hezbollah flag as her brothers hold portraits of the late Iranian Revolutionary Guard Gen. Qassem Soleimani, who was killed in a U.S. drone attack in 2020 in Iraq, as the family check their house destroyed in an Israeli strike in Aita al-Shaab village, south Lebanon, Monday, May 27, 2024. (AP Photo/Mohammad Zaatari)

A girl waves a Hezbollah flag as her brothers hold portraits of the late Iranian Revolutionary Guard Gen. Qassem Soleimani, who was killed in a U.S. drone attack in 2020 in Iraq, as the family check their house destroyed in an Israeli strike in Aita al-Shaab village, south Lebanon, Monday, May 27, 2024. (AP Photo/Mohammad Zaatari)

FILE - A tent camp housing Palestinians displaced by the Israeli offensive is seen in Rafah, Gaza Strip, on Feb. 27, 2024. The tent camps stretch for more than 16 kilometers (10 miles) along Gaza’s coast, filling the beach and sprawling into empty lots, fields and town streets. (AP Photo/Hatem Ali, file)

FILE - A tent camp housing Palestinians displaced by the Israeli offensive is seen in Rafah, Gaza Strip, on Feb. 27, 2024. The tent camps stretch for more than 16 kilometers (10 miles) along Gaza’s coast, filling the beach and sprawling into empty lots, fields and town streets. (AP Photo/Hatem Ali, file)

GALVESTON, Texas (AP) — Vacuums sucked the water out of the seaside inn run by Nick Gaido’s family in Galveston since 1911 as power was still spotty nearly one week after a resurgent Hurricane Beryl swept into Texas. Blue tarp covered much of the torn off roof. Gaido scheduled cleanup shifts for the hotel and restaurant staff who couldn’t afford to lose shifts to the enduring outages.

The July 4th weekend was supposed to kickstart a lucrative tourism season for this popular getaway’s hospitality industry. But just dozens dotted the typically crowded beaches one week later. Gaido felt an urgent need to send the message that Galveston, Texas, is back open.

“We’ve dealt with storms in late August or in September,” Gaido said. “But when you have a storm that hits in the beginning of July, that’s different.”

Galveston — about 50 miles (80 kilometers) southeast of Houston — has certainly weathered its share of natural disasters. Etched into its collective memory is the fury of a 1900 hurricane that killed thousands back when the island was emerging as a crown jewel for the state. More recently, Hurricane Ike’s 2008 wrath flooded its historic downtown with storm surge as high as 20 feet and caused more than $29 billion in damage.

Yet even greater Houston’s storm-seasoned neighbors got taken off guard by Beryl’s sudden arrival. Crashing unusually early in the calendar, the Category 1 hurricane brought the island’s tourism-based economy to a halt during a time when local restaurants rely on an influx of beachgoers to lift revenues. Despite the widespread power outage, businesses and residents are buckling down.

In the harder-hit west side of Jamaica Beach, Way West Grill and Pizzeria was still without electricity on Saturday afternoon. Owner Jake Vincent felt stuck in limbo: he had heard power would return by July 19 but had hope it might come sooner.

The loss ruined his entire inventory. He said enough mozzarella cheese to fill the back of his truck had gone to waste. Also spoiled was an 8-foot chest full of fries and an estimated 3,000 pounds of pepperonis.

Vincent no longer expects much from a year he had anticipated would finally bring “daylight” for his family-run restaurant founded in 2018. He said most of their annual sales come during the three summer months and that “this tourism season is probably done for.”

“It complicates things,” he said. “You bank all your summer money to get through the winter.”

Downed cables and orange construction cones could be found along the road linking the touristy strand’s seafood shacks to the west end’s colorful short-term rentals. Crews from Houston-area utility CenterPoint stood atop lifts, sweating as they restored line after line.

Still without power Saturday morning, Greg Alexander raked debris to the edge of the street in his Jamaica Beach neighborhood. Despite sleeping in a balcony-level room in a house already raised high off the ground, he said water poured into the windows. Beryl’s horizontal winds blew rain right onto his bed.

It’s just a part of life here for Alexander. His family moved full-time to Galveston in 2017 after he said Hurricane Harvey dumped 38 inches of water into their Lake City (mainland?) home. Without power, he said they’ve been “appreciating our car’s air conditioning more than ever.”

He doesn’t plan to leave. He said trials only strengthen the community.

“People on the west end aren’t like everybody else,” he said.

Steve Broom and Debra Pease still lacked power on Saturday but had been beating the heat elsewhere. Broom said they’d already booked a hotel in Houston this week so his daughter could use the Galveston beach house where they’ve lived full-time for about five years. They spent only the first night in Galveston and opted to sleep the rest of the week in their nonrefundable room.

Steve Broom, 72, said he had never seen a hurricane come as early or increase as quickly as Beryl. Still, he joked that just one factor could force him to move off the island where he grew up.

“If they wipe out all these houses, then we’ll be front row and our property value will probably double or triple,” he said, before clarifying: “No, I hope that doesn’t happen.”

Anne Beem and her husband come every July from San Antonio to celebrate their birthdays. For her, the aftermath has been far worse than the hurricane itself.

They enjoyed a nice breeze with the windows open after the storm passed Monday. But she said Tuesday night brought “mosquito-geddon.” Hundreds of bugs filled the house so they slept in their car with the air conditioning blasting.

She said they also bought a kiddie pool to cool off before the power came back Thursday night.

“We just tried to look at it as an adventure,” she said. “Each day was some fresh hell.”

Beachgoers toss a football in the waves as a beachfront wedding is prepared on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Beachgoers toss a football in the waves as a beachfront wedding is prepared on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

A lineman repairs a power line on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

A lineman repairs a power line on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Utility poles lean toward FM 3005 on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Utility poles lean toward FM 3005 on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Full time Galveston Island residents Debra Pease and Steve Broom pose underneath their bright peach island home while visiting to assess damage on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. The couple had coincidentally booked a hotel stay in Houston the week after Hurricane Beryl but will return to the island on Sunday to wait for power to be restored. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Full time Galveston Island residents Debra Pease and Steve Broom pose underneath their bright peach island home while visiting to assess damage on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. The couple had coincidentally booked a hotel stay in Houston the week after Hurricane Beryl but will return to the island on Sunday to wait for power to be restored. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Way West Grill & Pizzeria owner Jake Vincent takes a moment to reflect inside his empty, dark restaurant on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. Amidst the challenges, Vincent was quick to name several people and companies in the community who have helped his family and staff while they patiently wait for power to be restored. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Way West Grill & Pizzeria owner Jake Vincent takes a moment to reflect inside his empty, dark restaurant on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. Amidst the challenges, Vincent was quick to name several people and companies in the community who have helped his family and staff while they patiently wait for power to be restored. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Way West Grill & Pizzeria owner Jake Vincent looks over the dozen empty freezers and refrigerators inside his restaurant on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. He had just received a large shipment of food for the Fourth of July holiday and after low sales and the hurricane, was forced to throw away hundreds of pounds of food. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Way West Grill & Pizzeria owner Jake Vincent looks over the dozen empty freezers and refrigerators inside his restaurant on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. He had just received a large shipment of food for the Fourth of July holiday and after low sales and the hurricane, was forced to throw away hundreds of pounds of food. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Way West Grill & Pizzeria owner Jake Vincent describes the amount of loss his restaurant and staff have suffered after being without power since Monday on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. Vincent estimates it will take three days reopen once power is restored, although he has no idea when that will happen. Vincent worries for his staff, most of whom are family members. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Way West Grill & Pizzeria owner Jake Vincent describes the amount of loss his restaurant and staff have suffered after being without power since Monday on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. Vincent estimates it will take three days reopen once power is restored, although he has no idea when that will happen. Vincent worries for his staff, most of whom are family members. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

A lineman from Indiana repairs a power line on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

A lineman from Indiana repairs a power line on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Gaido's staff gather for a meeting before opening its dining room for the first time in six days after Hurricane Beryl damaged power lines on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. Owner Nick Gaido prepared employees for a slow opening as visitors to the island have dropped and reminded staff to be vigilant in ensuring the quality of every dish they serve. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Gaido's staff gather for a meeting before opening its dining room for the first time in six days after Hurricane Beryl damaged power lines on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. Owner Nick Gaido prepared employees for a slow opening as visitors to the island have dropped and reminded staff to be vigilant in ensuring the quality of every dish they serve. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

A generator powers cleaning equipment at Gaido's Seaside Inn on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. As of Saturday, power was restored to part of the hotel. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

A generator powers cleaning equipment at Gaido's Seaside Inn on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. As of Saturday, power was restored to part of the hotel. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Dozens of workers on continue to restore Gaido's Seaside Inn on every level of the building on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. Galveston business owners are doing everything they can to reopen establishments for both visitors and their employees. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Dozens of workers on continue to restore Gaido's Seaside Inn on every level of the building on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. Galveston business owners are doing everything they can to reopen establishments for both visitors and their employees. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

A sign informs visitors of closure at the Gaido's Seaside Inn on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. The hotel sustained significant roof damage from Hurricane Beryl and continued power issues almost a week after the storm. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

A sign informs visitors of closure at the Gaido's Seaside Inn on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. The hotel sustained significant roof damage from Hurricane Beryl and continued power issues almost a week after the storm. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Dr. Lee Grumbles leads a quick closing recap for volunteers and medical students with The Luke Society Clinic on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. The Luke Society serves uninsured residents while also supporting medical students at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston who make up a large part of the weekly volunteer team. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Dr. Lee Grumbles leads a quick closing recap for volunteers and medical students with The Luke Society Clinic on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. The Luke Society serves uninsured residents while also supporting medical students at the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston who make up a large part of the weekly volunteer team. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Volunteer pharmacist Sharon Metyko demonstrates how to use an inhaler for a patient on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. Metyko serves with The Luke Society Clinic and helps distribute prescriptions for the uninsured community in Galveston Island. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Volunteer pharmacist Sharon Metyko demonstrates how to use an inhaler for a patient on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. Metyko serves with The Luke Society Clinic and helps distribute prescriptions for the uninsured community in Galveston Island. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Dr. Lee Grumbles speaks with a patient regarding her checkup on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. Dr. Grumbles joined The Luke Society after retiring from The University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston and has been helping serve Galveston Island's uninsured population for 10 years. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Dr. Lee Grumbles speaks with a patient regarding her checkup on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. Dr. Grumbles joined The Luke Society after retiring from The University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston and has been helping serve Galveston Island's uninsured population for 10 years. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Tony Franco walks along hundreds of square feet of damaged roof Gaido's Seaside Inn of Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. Approximately one hundred workers were on site to restore the three large establishments affected under the Gaido's, Inc. umbrella - the hotel, Nick's Kitchen and Beach Bar and the iconic Gaido's restaurant. After power was restored to parts of the property. Gaido's restaurant expected a very slow re-opening in its dining room after being closed for six days. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Tony Franco walks along hundreds of square feet of damaged roof Gaido's Seaside Inn of Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. Approximately one hundred workers were on site to restore the three large establishments affected under the Gaido's, Inc. umbrella - the hotel, Nick's Kitchen and Beach Bar and the iconic Gaido's restaurant. After power was restored to parts of the property. Gaido's restaurant expected a very slow re-opening in its dining room after being closed for six days. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Attendees and volunteers circle up for a prayer after breakfast was served by the Galveston Street Ministry on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. The free breakfast happens every Saturday morning on the island in conjunction with a free medical clinic by The Luke Society Clinic. The morning's heavy rains may have prevented more participants from joining as leaders of each organization checked in on the community they serve. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Attendees and volunteers circle up for a prayer after breakfast was served by the Galveston Street Ministry on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. The free breakfast happens every Saturday morning on the island in conjunction with a free medical clinic by The Luke Society Clinic. The morning's heavy rains may have prevented more participants from joining as leaders of each organization checked in on the community they serve. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

A man wheels a portable generator across the empty parking lot of Gaido's Seaside Inn on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

A man wheels a portable generator across the empty parking lot of Gaido's Seaside Inn on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Amanda Scroggins, center, sits as Aaron Lee takes her blood pressure on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. Lee is a second year medical student at The University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston and volunteers with The Luke Society Clinic, an organization that provides a weekly healthcare clinic to uninsured residents. Clinic personnel were anxious to check in with people they serve after Hurricane Beryl ravaged different parts of the island. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Amanda Scroggins, center, sits as Aaron Lee takes her blood pressure on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. Lee is a second year medical student at The University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston and volunteers with The Luke Society Clinic, an organization that provides a weekly healthcare clinic to uninsured residents. Clinic personnel were anxious to check in with people they serve after Hurricane Beryl ravaged different parts of the island. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Linemen repair power lines on Jamaica Beach Road the west beach of Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Linemen repair power lines on Jamaica Beach Road the west beach of Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Linemen place a new fiberglass utility pole to replace older, leaning wooden poles along FM 3005 on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Linemen place a new fiberglass utility pole to replace older, leaning wooden poles along FM 3005 on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

A man takes advantage of calm waters as he paddle boards in front of the Galveston Island Historic Pleasure Pier on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

A man takes advantage of calm waters as he paddle boards in front of the Galveston Island Historic Pleasure Pier on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Work continues on the roof of Gaido's restaurant in preparation for opening for diners for the first time since Hurricane Beryl landed on Galveston Island six days prior on Saturday, July 13, 2024. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Work continues on the roof of Gaido's restaurant in preparation for opening for diners for the first time since Hurricane Beryl landed on Galveston Island six days prior on Saturday, July 13, 2024. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Fisherman take advantage of calm waters on a jetty perpendicular to the Galveston seawall on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Fisherman take advantage of calm waters on a jetty perpendicular to the Galveston seawall on Galveston Island on Saturday, July 13, 2024. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Restauranteur Nick Gaido recounts both the challenges of hurricane aftermath and how the island community is helping each other after Hurricane Beryl landed on Galveston Island almost a week ago on Saturday, July 13, 2024. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Restauranteur Nick Gaido recounts both the challenges of hurricane aftermath and how the island community is helping each other after Hurricane Beryl landed on Galveston Island almost a week ago on Saturday, July 13, 2024. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Workers complete final repairs on the dining room at Gaido's as the iconic restaurant prepared staff to open for the first time in six days on Saturday, July 13, 2024. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Workers complete final repairs on the dining room at Gaido's as the iconic restaurant prepared staff to open for the first time in six days on Saturday, July 13, 2024. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Work continues on the roof of Gaido's restaurant in preparation for opening for diners for the first time since Hurricane Beryl landed on Galveston Island six days prior on Saturday, July 13, 2024. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

Work continues on the roof of Gaido's restaurant in preparation for opening for diners for the first time since Hurricane Beryl landed on Galveston Island six days prior on Saturday, July 13, 2024. (AP Photo/Annie Mulligan)

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