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China’s southern island province sees success in coral protection, restoration

China

China

China

China’s southern island province sees success in coral protection, restoration

2024-06-08 14:53 Last Updated At:06-09 00:05

South China's island province of Hainan has been advancing its coral conservation and restoration program as part of efforts to protect the shorelines and enhance marine biodiversity.

Saturday marks World Oceans Day. On Fenjiezhou Island, a tourist destination off the southeast coast of the province's main island, diving hobbyists are drawn to explore the diverse marine ecosystem beneath the sea. The island is also home to an invaluable experimental base for marine research.

Since 2004, local authorities have started to cooperate with scientific research institutions to carry out coral conservation. After 20 years of steady effort, the degraded coral reefs have become vibrant underwater habitats, greatly boosting the number of marine species.

"Coral plays a crucial role in the entire marine ecosystem, as 25 percent of all marine creatures rely on the coral reef ecosystem to survive," said Professor Wang Peizheng from Hainan Tropical Ocean University.

Apart from direct intervention in coral breeding, efforts have also been made to reduce pollution from marine aquaculture. In Yanfeng Town, Haikou City, a new type of crop called sea cordyceps -- an fungus with medical applications newly made growable in the sea -- has been planted in the coastal saline-alkali land, effectively combating pollution by purifying aquaculture wastewater and solving the problem of coastal eutrophication, or excessive plant and algal growth.

China’s southern island province sees success in coral protection, restoration

China’s southern island province sees success in coral protection, restoration

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Japanese seek diversified investment options as yen devalues

2024-07-14 12:04 Last Updated At:12:37

The Japanese people are eyeing diversified investment options at a three-day wealth management exhibition which started on Friday in Tokyo, as the depreciation of their fiat currency yen goes on.

Since July, the retail price of gold in Japan has repeatedly hit new highs, and the price per gram rose to 13,612 yen (about 86 U.S. dollars) on Thursday.

As inflation continues in Japan, precious metals are increasingly popular as a way to beat it.

In addition to paper gold, rare precious metal coins have gradually become one of the new financial investment favorites in Japan in recent years.

"The gold content of coins determines their value as precious metals. But as collectibles, their price on the auction market will go up," said Mitsuru Hayama, an exhibitor.

In addition to traditional financial products which include real estate, there is a trend of diversification at this exhibition.

For example, for investment products such as agricultural blueberry gardens and mushroom farms, investors can choose to make investment only, or they can participate in specific business operations.

Investable wines and whiskies are also a big draw at the expo. Among them, wine investment has an online trading model, where investors can view the latest prices of wines on their mobile phones in real time and conduct transactions .

"You buy it when it's cheap and drink it whenever you want. This is the prime pleasure of investing in the wine. Even if you don't drink it yourself, you'll be happy if its price rallies," said Eiji Odawara, an exhibitor.

According to the latest data released by the Bank of Japan in June, as of the end of March this year, the scale of Japanese household financial assets inched up 7.1 percent compared with the same period last year, reaching 2,199 trillion yen (about 13.9 trillion U.S. dollars), hitting record highs for five consecutive quarters.

Among them, cash and deposits accounted for 50.9 percent, much higher than other advanced economies such as the United States and some European countries.

Japanese seek diversified investment options as yen devalues

Japanese seek diversified investment options as yen devalues

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