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Stanley Cup Final returns to Edmonton 4 years since the city hosted the series in a bubble

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Stanley Cup Final returns to Edmonton 4 years since the city hosted the series in a bubble
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Stanley Cup Final returns to Edmonton 4 years since the city hosted the series in a bubble

2024-06-14 06:19 Last Updated At:06:30

EDMONTON, Alberta (AP) — While the Oilers are in the Stanley Cup Final for the first time since 2006, their home city and arena have hosted the NHL's championship series much more recently.

Edmonton's Rogers Place and surrounding ICE District made up one of the two playoff bubbles put together to complete the 2019-20 season during the pandemic, serving as the site for the first two rounds in the West, the conference finals and then the Cup final.

Four years since that surreal experience, several players who made runs of varying degrees in an empty arena are back in this final between the Oilers and Florida Panthers, which is quite the opposite with orange-and-blue clad fans packing the building.

“Obviously, it was a different experience than it is now,” said Florida's Carter Verhaeghe, who hoisted the Stanley Cup in 2020 as a member of the Tampa Bay Lightning. “With the fans and everything, it makes a big difference (with) traveling (and) home-ice advantage and stuff like that.”

Edmonton's Corey Perry spent 80 days in that bubble on the Dallas Stars run to the final that ended with a six-game series loss to Tampa Bay. Back playing for the Cup for a fourth time in five years, the veteran winger remembers the whole process being a challenge, particularly off the ice.

"It’s not easy: 79 or 80 days, whatever it was, in the hotel room: sitting in a hotel room, the same path to the rink, the same restaurants that were open," Perry said. “Mentally, it was exhausting and tough, but we found a way.”

Teammate Derek Ryan, who had a shorter stint with the Calgary Flames winning their qualifying round series and losing the next one, called it a mental grind.

“You’re away from everybody,” Ryan said. “You’re kind of isolated from everyone besides your team, basically. ... It’s crazy to imagine living through that. It was pretty wild."

On the ice was wild in a very different way, with tarps covering the stands and no crowd noise. Florida's Oliver Ekman-Larsson, who was in the bubble with Arizona for two rounds, said players did not have to be too loud calling out to teammates.

There was still plenty of yelling to rachet up the intensity.

“You had to create your own energy,” Perry said. “You had to create emotion. You didn’t feed off that from the fans. You didn’t hear that from the fans. It was tough. But you heard everything. And everything that was said on the ice, everybody could hear it in the arena."

In retrospect, Ekman-Larsson called it a great experience because he and so many players, coaches and staff can say they lived through it — and hope to never do anything like that again.

“We got the chance to play hockey during a pandemic, so I think we were fortunate to do that,” Ekman-Larsson said. “It was crazy times, but we’re happy to be here now with two sold-out buildings and a lot of fun.”

Panthers captain Aleksander Barkov was cleared to play in Game 3 Thursday night after leaving midway through the third period of his team's Game 2 victory following a high hit from Edmonton star Leon Draisaitl. Barkov practiced each of the past five days and did not have to go into concussion protocol.

“It’s never easy when someone like that goes down, especially in a huge part of the game with nine, 10 minutes left,” forward Sam Reinhart said. “It shows to the character of him and how bad he wants it, as well, to get back and not really miss much else. ”

Having Barkov, the Selke Trophy winner as the league's best defensive forward during the regular season and a candidate for the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff MVP, in the lineup is a big deal for the Panthers because of the impact he can make all over the ice.

Coach Paul Maurice said on the road, where he does not have the last line change to control matchups, Barkov can shine offensively.

AP NHL playoffs: https://apnews.com/hub/stanley-cup and https://www.apnews.com/hub/NHL

Edmonton Oilers fans Jayson Wood, left, and his son Peyton, 13, pose outside the arena to cheer on before Game 3 of the NHL hockey Stanley Cup Finals against the Florida Panthers in Edmonton, Alberta, Thursday, June 13, 2024. (Jeff McIntosh/The Canadian Press via AP)

Edmonton Oilers fans Jayson Wood, left, and his son Peyton, 13, pose outside the arena to cheer on before Game 3 of the NHL hockey Stanley Cup Finals against the Florida Panthers in Edmonton, Alberta, Thursday, June 13, 2024. (Jeff McIntosh/The Canadian Press via AP)

FILE -0 The Dallas Stars and the Tampa Bay Lightning warm up before the NHL hockey Stanley Cup Finals in Edmonton, Alberta, Saturday, Sept. 19, 2020. The Edmonton Oilers are in the Stanley Cup Final for the first time since 2006. But the NHL's championship series has been in the northern Alberta city much more recently. (Jason Franson/The Canadian Press via AP, File)

FILE -0 The Dallas Stars and the Tampa Bay Lightning warm up before the NHL hockey Stanley Cup Finals in Edmonton, Alberta, Saturday, Sept. 19, 2020. The Edmonton Oilers are in the Stanley Cup Final for the first time since 2006. But the NHL's championship series has been in the northern Alberta city much more recently. (Jason Franson/The Canadian Press via AP, File)

YOKNEAM, Israel & COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Jul 22, 2024--

Rapid Medical™, a leading developer of advanced endovascular devices, announces the first procedures in the USA with the breakthrough deflectable access platform DRIVEWIRE 24 at the 2024 Society of NeuroInterventional Surgery’s (SNIS) 21st Annual Meeting. With active technology, DRIVEWIRE articulates a wide range of catheters for direct access to endovascular locations.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20240722355520/en/

“DRIVEWIRE addresses a major unmet need in the endovascular space,” exclaims Dr. Shahram Majidi of Mount Sinai Health System in New York City, NY. “It transforms access across a range of procedures, from aneurysms to strokes and more. We’re always looking for devices to make procedures faster, safer, less expensive. My first experience with DRIVEWIRE suggests it could do all of these.”

In the 2 cases completed by Dr. Majidi, DRIVEWIRE 24 navigated the aspiration catheter directly to the M2 arterial occlusion for first-pass excellent reperfusion. In the second case, DRIVEWIRE navigated complex turns to place 2 flow diverters in a large, multilobed aneurysm.

DRIVEWIRE provides high-performance intravascular steering. Physicians control the direction and shape of the guidewire tip in real time, eliminating the need to remove the wire to reshape it. The device also features variable support to articulate a wide range of micro and intermediate catheters without advanced forerun or additional support devices. This results in precise navigation via the most direct route through the neuro and peripheral vasculature.

“With DRIVEWIRE, our design goal was to bring new levels of access and control to the interventional suite while improving best-in-class guidewires,” comments Giora Kornblau, Chief Technology Officer at Rapid Medical. “When physicians are looking for technologies that increase the clinical possibilities and safety for the patient, we want Rapid to be the first place they look.”

About Rapid Medical

Rapid Medical expands what’s possible in neurovascular treatment by pioneering advanced interventional devices that treat ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. Utilizing proprietary manufacturing techniques, Rapid Medical’s products are remotely adjustable and fully visible. This enables physicians to respond in real-time to the anatomy and tailor the approach to every patient for better procedural outcomes. TIGERTRIEVER™ 13, 17, and 21, COMANECI ™ and COLUMBUS™/ DRIVEWIRE 14 are CE marked and FDA cleared. DRIVEWIRE 24 is FDA cleared. TIGERTRIEVER XL is also CE marked. More information is available at www.rapid-medical.com.

Rapid Medical™ Completes Initial Neurovascular Cases in the USA Following FDA Clearance of Its Active Access Solution

Rapid Medical™ Completes Initial Neurovascular Cases in the USA Following FDA Clearance of Its Active Access Solution

DRIVEWIRE 24 redefines interventional access by providing an active deflectable tip that controls and steers a range of catheters directly to the target vessels. Whereas conventional access devices are reactive and rely on external forces to reach their target, DRIVEWIRE's active technology selects turns on-demand and handles the complexity of navigating the vascular highway with ease. (Graphic: Business Wire)

DRIVEWIRE 24 redefines interventional access by providing an active deflectable tip that controls and steers a range of catheters directly to the target vessels. Whereas conventional access devices are reactive and rely on external forces to reach their target, DRIVEWIRE's active technology selects turns on-demand and handles the complexity of navigating the vascular highway with ease. (Graphic: Business Wire)

Rapid Medical™ Completes Initial Neurovascular Cases in the USA Following FDA Clearance of Its Active Access Solution

Rapid Medical™ Completes Initial Neurovascular Cases in the USA Following FDA Clearance of Its Active Access Solution

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