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Chargers QB Herbert takes in stride another offseason of learning a new offense and playbook

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Chargers QB Herbert takes in stride another offseason of learning a new offense and playbook
News

News

Chargers QB Herbert takes in stride another offseason of learning a new offense and playbook

2024-06-14 06:55 Last Updated At:07:11

COSTA MESA, Calif. (AP) — Justin Herbert having to learn a new playbook and working with a different offensive coordinator in college and the NFL has become a familiar routine.

Herbert, along with many Los Angeles Chargers fans, are hoping that the new regime of coach Jim Harbaugh and offensive coordinator Greg Roman will be around for awhile.

As the Chargers wrapped up their offseason program on Thursday, Herbert was pleased with what he was able to accomplish in the past couple of months.

“Greg has done a great job of installing it and demonstrating exactly what he sees from the offense,” Herbert said. “It's definitely a complex, difficult offense to learn, but we've done our best to pick it up. A lot has been thrown at us, but with the way we've picked it up and attacked it, I'm looking forward to running it.”

Roman is the fourth offensive coordinator Herbert has worked with since he was the sixth overall pick in the 2020 draft. He also had three offensive coordinators during his four seasons at Oregon.

Harbaugh is the sixth head coach Herbert has had in college and the pros.

While some quarterbacks would get unnerved over the constant changes, Herbert has tried to take the opposite approach.

“I would say that it’s a good opportunity to learn more football. Because I think at the end of the day, a lot of the concepts are similar. They’re just called something else,” he said. “The identity of the offense vary with the coordinator, but understanding the concepts and if it's still Cover 3, these are the beaters and if it's Cover 2, these are the beaters, that part of football doesn't change.”

Roman said Herbert's ability in picking up different systems has been pretty remarkable.

“I mean, as deep as he dives into things, every offense he has been in has been a deep dive. To be in June right now and have him where he is with us and what we’re doing speaks volumes,” Roman said. “We've tried to overload him a couple times, and it just wasn't happening.”

Herbert said they went through three full installations of the offense during the offseason program, and that there is a good base for things to continue to evolve going into training camp when it begins next month.

Installing a new offensive scheme wasn't the only significant change for Herbert. Four of his top five playmakers from his first four seasons in the league are no longer on the roster. The two biggest departures were wide receivers Keenan Allen (traded to Chicago) and Mike Williams (released) while running back Austin Ekeler and tight end Gerald Everett signed elsewhere during free agency.

Herbert also will have two new running backs in Gus Edwards and J.K. Dobbins as well as two new offensive lineman (center Bradley Bozeman and rookie right tackle Joe Alt).

“It’s tough to replace guys like that just because there’s not many like them," Herbert said. “You could guess that it would be difficult (with younger, inexperienced receivers) but it hasn't been. They've picked up everything, even the draft picks. We're all learning a new offense, but the way everyone has attacked it, it's been good to see.”

All of the personnel changes, as well as Harbaugh's philosophy of being a physical offense that can run the ball, should also hopefully reduce the injury risk to Herbert.

In the past two seasons, Herbert has had bruised ribs, a torn labrum to his non-throwing shoulder and two broken fingers, including one on his throwing hand that caused him to miss the final four games last season.

Herbert had surgery on the finger in mid-December and was back to throwing a football in March.

At 63.5%, the Chargers have had the second-biggest rate of passing plays over the past three seasons. That figure is expected decrease this upcoming season.

“We want to be great at running and throwing the ball. We want to have balance with our offense,” Roman said. “We’re not just going to just run the ball into a brick wall. Sometimes the illusion of wanting to run the ball a lot is just as powerful as the ability to.”

Herbert isn't concerned with how many throws he will get per game, as long as it translates into wins.

“Selfishly, as a quarterback, I’d love to throw the ball every time. But if we we throw it one time or we throw it 100 times, as long as we’re winning and find a way to do that, it’s good with me,” he said.

AP NFL: https://apnews.com/hub/nfl

Los Angeles Chargers quarterback Justin Herbert runs drills with running back Isaiah Spiller during an NFL football practice Tuesday, June 4, 2024, in Costa Mesa, Calif. (AP Photo/Ryan Sun)

Los Angeles Chargers quarterback Justin Herbert runs drills with running back Isaiah Spiller during an NFL football practice Tuesday, June 4, 2024, in Costa Mesa, Calif. (AP Photo/Ryan Sun)

Los Angeles Chargers quarterback Justin Herbert, right, warms up near head coach Jim Harbaugh during NFL football practice Tuesday, June 4, 2024, in Costa Mesa, Calif. (AP Photo/Ryan Sun)

Los Angeles Chargers quarterback Justin Herbert, right, warms up near head coach Jim Harbaugh during NFL football practice Tuesday, June 4, 2024, in Costa Mesa, Calif. (AP Photo/Ryan Sun)

Los Angeles Chargers quarterback Justin Herbert throws a pass during NFL football practice Tuesday, June 11, 2024, at Marine Corps Base in Camp Pendleton, Calif. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

Los Angeles Chargers quarterback Justin Herbert throws a pass during NFL football practice Tuesday, June 11, 2024, at Marine Corps Base in Camp Pendleton, Calif. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

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Internet outage latest | Airlines, businesses hit by global technology disruption

2024-07-19 22:49 Last Updated At:22:51

A major internet outage affecting Microsoft is disrupting flights, banks, media outlets and companies across the world, with problems continuing hours after the technology company said it was gradually fixing an issue affecting access to Microsoft 365 apps and services.

Airlines and airports in the United States, Europe, Australia, India and elsewhere were reporting problems, with some flights grounded. Retail outlets, banks, railway companies and hospitals in several parts of the world were also affected in what appeared to be an unprecedented internet disruption.

Here's the Latest:

SAO PAULO — Bradesco, one of the main banks in Brazil, notified its users via its app that digital services were unstable due to a global cyber outage, but its ATMs were working normally. Bradesco has over 100 million clients.

Azul Airlines, a Brazilian low-cost airline, said its check-in systems were affected, causing occasional flight delays. The company recommended that customers arrive at the airport earlier. The National Civil Aviation Agency of Brazil said it is monitoring the impacts on airports, but so far there haven’t been major delays.

TOKYO — Universal Studios Japan in Osaka, western Japan, said the global system outage that started Friday will continue to affect ticket sales at the park over the weekend.

The park said its ticket booths sales will not be available Saturday and Sunday and asked visitors to purchase their tickets on the USJ official website or via designated ticket sales site Lawson Ticket. Park attractions aren't affected.

Officials in some U.S. states, including Alaska, Virginia and Iowa, warned of problems to 911 emergency call centers in their areas. Alaska State Troopers warned that many 911 and nonemergency call centers across the state weren't working correctly and shared alternate numbers.

In Virginia, the City of Fairfax Police Department said on social media that it was experiencing technical difficulties with its phone systems, including 911. The department shared a nonemergency number for callers and said 911 could still be used, but calls wouldn't go directly to the dispatch center.

The New Hampshire Emergency Services and Communications reported a temporary interruption to 911 calls early Friday, with the system fully restored several hours later, officials said. In Iowa, the Marion County Sheriff’s Office warned on social media that phone lines were down and 911 calls might be routed to neighboring counties, but emergency calls would be promptly redirected to the sheriff’s office.

In New England, the outage led some hospitals to cancel appointments.

A spokesman at Mass General Brigham, the largest health care system in Massachusetts, said the outage had resulted in all scheduled nonurgent surgeries, procedures and medical visits being canceled for Friday. Emergency departments remain open and care for patients in the hospital hasn't been impacted.

TORONTO — The outage grounded some flights, disrupted hospitals and backed up border crossings in Canada on Friday.

Porter Airlines said it was canceling its flights for several hours because of the outage. Meanwhile, Air Canada, Canada’s largest airline, said there is no major impact to its operations, adding that it's monitoring the situation closely. University Health Network, one of Canada’s largest hospital networks, said that some of its systems had been impacted by the outage. In a post to social media, it said clinical activity was continuing as scheduled, but some patients may experience delays. Windsor Police reported long delays at both the Canada-United States border crossings at the Ambassador Bridge and the Detroit-Windsor tunnel.

COLOMBO, Sri Lanka — The National Center for Cyber Security in Sri Lanka says four information technology companies in Sri Lanka have been affected because of the global outage.

Sri Lanka Computer Emergency Readiness Team, which is known as Sri Lanka CERT, says that so far only four companies have informed them of being affected and the center attributed them to a problem with the cybersecurity platform CrowdStrike.

Charuka Damunupola, lead information security engineer at Sri Lanka CERT, says those companies were using CrowdStrike software and their systems “are in failure mode.”

BERLIN — Landings at Switzerland's Zurich Airport were back to normal on Friday afternoon after being suspended earlier in the day, and the airport operator said takeoffs to the U.S. also resumed.

At least 100 flights to and from Zurich were canceled Friday.

BERLIN — A German regional grocery chain, Tegut, temporarily shut its 340 stores in the country Friday morning as the computer outage affected cash register systems.

By early afternoon, more than half of the stores were open again.

CAPE TOWN, South Africa — In South Africa, at least two major banks said they experienced service disruptions as customers complained they weren’t able to make payments using their bank cards at grocery stores and gas stations or use ATMs. Both said they were able to restore services hours later.

Southern African regional airline Airlink also reported that its IT network and telephone lines were down because of what it called a global network outage, but said flights weren't affected.

LONDON — The London Stock Exchange says it is experiencing disruptions from the technology outage that has created chaos around the globe.

The LSE says its regulatory news service was not working Friday morning, but the outage hadn't affected trading.

“We are currently experiencing a third party technical issue which is impacting some of our services,” a London Stock Exchange Group spokesperson said in a statement.

The exchange says it’s trying to resolve the problem as soon as possible.

Long queues have formed at many airports around the world as the global internet outage hit check-in procedures for flights — although in some locations systems were now back online.

Berlin’s Brandenburg Airport was gradually returning to normal operations, the airport said in a statement, though some airlines had been forced to cancel flights after being hit with the outage from 7 a.m. local time (0500 GMT).

“Passenger handling continued with some restrictions. Departures took place with restrictions. There are still waiting times. Unfortunately, some flights had to be canceled by the airlines. The airport’s systems have been restarted and we are gradually returning to normal operations,” the airport said.

German-based airline Eurowings, a budget subsidiary of Lufthansa, says it had to cancel German domestic flights as well as services to and from the U.K. because of disruption to its check-in and boarding processes. It called on people traveling inside Germany to book train tickets and submit them for reimbursement.

In South Korea, several low-cost airlines reported problems, triggering delays in passenger boardings at Incheon international Airport, the country’s biggest airport, airport officials said.

Jeju Air Co. said it was experiencing problems with ticketing and other services on its website. Air Premia Inc. said key services on its website, such as ticket bookings, cancellations and online check-ins, weren't working. The website of Eastar Jet Co. wasn’t accessible as of early Friday evening. Incheon airport officials and the country’s Transport Ministry said they were checking details of damages.

AirAsia announced on its Thai Facebook page that its reservation and check-in system had been impacted and encouraged passengers to go to airports early as they might face slower check-in and longer lines.

In the U.S., United Airlines said that the outage was impacting its computer systems and warned customers of potential flight delays. The carrier said some flights are resuming and it is issuing waivers to make it easier to change travel plans within its website.

LONDON — The chief executive of the cybersecurity company at the heart of a worldwide Microsoft outage says it is working to fix a defect sent out in a Windows update.

“This is not a security incident or cyberattack,” CrowdStrike CEO George Kurtz posted on X. “The issue has been identified, isolated and a fix has been deployed.”

Kurtz said there was a defect in a “single content update for Windows hosts.” Mac and Linux hosts weren't affected.

The company referred customers to its support portal for updates.

HELSINKI — Two pharmacy chains in Norway said they are having problems providing customers with their prescription medicine and are facing substantial connection delays because of the global network problems.

Several branches of the Apotek1 pharmacy have closed across Norway after being affected by IT issues, which also shut down the chain’s online sales, the Norwegian news agency NTB reported.

The Boots drugstore and pharmacy chain also ran into problems delivering products to clients in Norway. Boots said that “due to global network problems, you may experience challenges with ordering and possible delays in dispatches,” NTB reported.

PARIS — Paris Olympics organizers say some Olympic delegations’ arrivals, as well as the delivery of some uniforms and accreditations, have been delayed because of the outage.

The organizers said in a statement that ticketing and the torch relay haven't been affected.

“Our teams have been fully mobilized to ensure the continuity of operations at optimum levels,” organizers said.

LONDON — Britain’s National Health Service says a global internet outage is causing problems at most doctors’ offices across England.

NHS England said in a statement that the glitch was hitting the appointment and patient record system used across the health service. The state-funded NHS treats the vast majority of people in the U.K.

The NHS said the issue was affecting the majority of family doctors’ practices, but wasn't hitting the 999 number used to call for emergency ambulances.

Airlines across the world, from Thailand to Australia, India, the United States and several European countries, reported disruptions to check-in systems and other issues that caused flights to be grounded or delayed.

With athletes and spectators from around the world heading to France for the Paris Olympics, the Paris airport authority says its computer systems ″are not impacted″ by the global outage, but several airlines and airports elsewhere are.

As a result, ″this situation has an impact on the operations of airlines at Paris-Charles de Gaulle and Paris-Orly airports: delays in check-in, delays and temporary suspension of some flights. Our teams are mobilized to orient and assist passengers,″ the airport authority said in a statement.

In the U.S., the FAA said the airlines United, American, Delta and Allegiant had all been grounded.

Thailand’s Suvarnabhumi Airport, a gateway to one of the world’s most visited cities, reported that some airlines were forced to check in passengers manually because of outages to their systems, while in the country's second largest airport of Don Mueang, Air Asia was also checking passengers in manually.

Director of Tourism of Thailand, the country’s tourism authority, told state broadcaster Thai PBS the issue was with Navitaire, an e-commerce platform for air travel, and up to six airports had been affected.

In Germany, flights at Berlin-Brandenburg Airport were halted for several hours from Friday morning because of check-in problems, while some flights were canceled. An airport spokeswoman said flights resumed after 10 a.m. Issues were also reported in the busy European hubs of Amsterdam, Zurich and Rome.

WARSAW — Baltic Hub, a major container hub in the Baltic port of Gdansk, Poland, says it's battling problems resulting from the global system outage.

Their entry gates are temporarily closed and they have suspended business, the Baltic Hub said in a statement.

Travelers wait in Terminal 1 for check-in at Hamburg Airport, in Hamburg, Germany, Friday July 19, 2024 as a widespread Microsoft outage disrupted flights, banks, media outlets and companies around the world on Friday. (Bodo Marks/dpa via AP)

Travelers wait in Terminal 1 for check-in at Hamburg Airport, in Hamburg, Germany, Friday July 19, 2024 as a widespread Microsoft outage disrupted flights, banks, media outlets and companies around the world on Friday. (Bodo Marks/dpa via AP)

Passengers crowd the International flights departure terminal of Rome's Fiumicino airport, Friday, July 19, 2024, as many flights have been delayed or cancelled due to the worldwide internet outage. Microsoft says users worldwide may be unable to access various Microsoft 365 apps and services in a widespread outage. The cause, exact nature and scale of the outage was unclear. Microsoft appeared to suggest in its X posts that the situation was improving, but hours later, widespread outages were being reported by airlines around the world. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

Passengers crowd the International flights departure terminal of Rome's Fiumicino airport, Friday, July 19, 2024, as many flights have been delayed or cancelled due to the worldwide internet outage. Microsoft says users worldwide may be unable to access various Microsoft 365 apps and services in a widespread outage. The cause, exact nature and scale of the outage was unclear. Microsoft appeared to suggest in its X posts that the situation was improving, but hours later, widespread outages were being reported by airlines around the world. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

A plane takes off at the capital's Berlin Brandenburg Airport, in Schönefeld, Germany, Friday July 19, 2024. A widespread Microsoft outage disrupted flights, banks, media outlets and companies around the world on Friday. (Christoph Soeder/dpa via AP)

A plane takes off at the capital's Berlin Brandenburg Airport, in Schönefeld, Germany, Friday July 19, 2024. A widespread Microsoft outage disrupted flights, banks, media outlets and companies around the world on Friday. (Christoph Soeder/dpa via AP)

Commuter disembark a Great Northern railway train at Hunt's Cross station in Liverpool, England, amid reports of widespread IT outages affecting airlines, broadcasters and banks, Friday, July 19, 2024. (Peter Byrne/PA via AP)

Commuter disembark a Great Northern railway train at Hunt's Cross station in Liverpool, England, amid reports of widespread IT outages affecting airlines, broadcasters and banks, Friday, July 19, 2024. (Peter Byrne/PA via AP)

Passengers crowd the International flights departure terminal of Rome's Fiumicino airport, Friday, July 19, 2024, as many flights have been delayed or cancelled due to the worldwide internet outage. Microsoft says users worldwide may be unable to access various Microsoft 365 apps and services in a widespread outage. The cause, exact nature and scale of the outage was unclear. Microsoft appeared to suggest in its X posts that the situation was improving, but hours later, widespread outages were being reported by airlines around the world. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

Passengers crowd the International flights departure terminal of Rome's Fiumicino airport, Friday, July 19, 2024, as many flights have been delayed or cancelled due to the worldwide internet outage. Microsoft says users worldwide may be unable to access various Microsoft 365 apps and services in a widespread outage. The cause, exact nature and scale of the outage was unclear. Microsoft appeared to suggest in its X posts that the situation was improving, but hours later, widespread outages were being reported by airlines around the world. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

Travelers wait in Terminal 1 for check-in at Hamburg Airport, in Hamburg, Germany, Friday July 19, 2024 as a widespread Microsoft outage disrupted flights, banks, media outlets and companies around the world on Friday. (Bodo Marks/dpa via AP)

Travelers wait in Terminal 1 for check-in at Hamburg Airport, in Hamburg, Germany, Friday July 19, 2024 as a widespread Microsoft outage disrupted flights, banks, media outlets and companies around the world on Friday. (Bodo Marks/dpa via AP)

Travelers at Los Angeles International Airport sleep in a jetway for a delayed United Airlines flight to Dulles International Airport due to a widespread global outage early Friday, July 19, 2024, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Stefanie Dazio)

Travelers at Los Angeles International Airport sleep in a jetway for a delayed United Airlines flight to Dulles International Airport due to a widespread global outage early Friday, July 19, 2024, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Stefanie Dazio)

The logo of Microsoft is seen outside it's French headquarters in Issy-les-Moulineaux, outside Paris, Monday May 13, 2024. Microsoft users worldwide, including banks and airlines, reported widespread outages on Friday, July 19, 2024 hours after the technology company said it was gradually fixing an issue affecting access to Microsoft 365 apps and services. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)

The logo of Microsoft is seen outside it's French headquarters in Issy-les-Moulineaux, outside Paris, Monday May 13, 2024. Microsoft users worldwide, including banks and airlines, reported widespread outages on Friday, July 19, 2024 hours after the technology company said it was gradually fixing an issue affecting access to Microsoft 365 apps and services. (AP Photo/Thibault Camus)

A traveler at Los Angeles International Airport sits in a jetway for a delayed United Airlines flight to Dulles International Airport due to a widespread global technology outage disrupting flights, banks, media outlets and companies around the world, Friday, July 19, 2024, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Stefanie Dazio)

A traveler at Los Angeles International Airport sits in a jetway for a delayed United Airlines flight to Dulles International Airport due to a widespread global technology outage disrupting flights, banks, media outlets and companies around the world, Friday, July 19, 2024, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Stefanie Dazio)

Numerous passengers wait in front of a black display board at the capital's Berlin Brandenburg Airport, in Schönefeld, Germany, Friday July 19, 2024, after a widespread technology outage disrupted flights, banks, media outlets and companies around the world. (Christoph Soeder/dpa via AP)

Numerous passengers wait in front of a black display board at the capital's Berlin Brandenburg Airport, in Schönefeld, Germany, Friday July 19, 2024, after a widespread technology outage disrupted flights, banks, media outlets and companies around the world. (Christoph Soeder/dpa via AP)

Passengers crowd the International flights departure terminal of Rome's Fiumicino airport, Friday, July 19, 2024, as many flights have been delayed or cancelled due to the worldwide internet outage. Microsoft says users worldwide may be unable to access various Microsoft 365 apps and services in a widespread outage. The cause, exact nature and scale of the outage was unclear. Microsoft appeared to suggest in its X posts that the situation was improving, but hours later, widespread outages were being reported by airlines around the world. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

Passengers crowd the International flights departure terminal of Rome's Fiumicino airport, Friday, July 19, 2024, as many flights have been delayed or cancelled due to the worldwide internet outage. Microsoft says users worldwide may be unable to access various Microsoft 365 apps and services in a widespread outage. The cause, exact nature and scale of the outage was unclear. Microsoft appeared to suggest in its X posts that the situation was improving, but hours later, widespread outages were being reported by airlines around the world. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

Passengers crowd the International flights departure terminal of Rome's Fiumicino airport, Friday, July 19, 2024, as many flights have been delayed or cancelled due to the worldwide internet outage. Microsoft says users worldwide may be unable to access various Microsoft 365 apps and services in a widespread outage. The cause, exact nature and scale of the outage was unclear. Microsoft appeared to suggest in its X posts that the situation was improving, but hours later, widespread outages were being reported by airlines around the world. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

Passengers crowd the International flights departure terminal of Rome's Fiumicino airport, Friday, July 19, 2024, as many flights have been delayed or cancelled due to the worldwide internet outage. Microsoft says users worldwide may be unable to access various Microsoft 365 apps and services in a widespread outage. The cause, exact nature and scale of the outage was unclear. Microsoft appeared to suggest in its X posts that the situation was improving, but hours later, widespread outages were being reported by airlines around the world. (AP Photo/Gregorio Borgia)

Passengers gather near check-in counters at Narita International Airport in Narita, east of Tokyo Friday, July 19, 2024, after a technology outage. A widespread Microsoft outage disrupted flights, banks, media outlets and companies around the world on Friday. (Kyodo News via AP)

Passengers gather near check-in counters at Narita International Airport in Narita, east of Tokyo Friday, July 19, 2024, after a technology outage. A widespread Microsoft outage disrupted flights, banks, media outlets and companies around the world on Friday. (Kyodo News via AP)

Travelers wait in Terminal 1 for check-in at Hamburg Airport, in Hamburg, Germany, Friday July 19, 2024. A widespread Microsoft outage disrupted flights, banks, media outlets and companies around the world on Friday. (Bodo Marks/dpa via AP)

Travelers wait in Terminal 1 for check-in at Hamburg Airport, in Hamburg, Germany, Friday July 19, 2024. A widespread Microsoft outage disrupted flights, banks, media outlets and companies around the world on Friday. (Bodo Marks/dpa via AP)

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