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Employers and employees should make reasonable work arrangements after tropical cyclones or rainstorms

HK

Employers and employees should make reasonable work arrangements after tropical cyclones or rainstorms
HK

HK

Employers and employees should make reasonable work arrangements after tropical cyclones or rainstorms

2024-06-14 11:31 Last Updated At:06-15 01:55

Employers reminded to make flexible work arrangements for staff after cancellation of weather warnings to ensure safety and smooth operations, says labour department

The Labour Department (LD) today (June 14) reminded employers to make practical and reasonable work arrangements for employees after the cancellation of tropical cyclone warnings or rainstorm warnings, with due consideration to the road and traffic conditions and other factors, and make flexible arrangements for staff to resume work or work remotely (if applicable). This will help maintain good labour-management relations, and ensure the safety of employees as well as the smooth operation of organisations.

"For staff who have genuine difficulties in resuming work on time upon cancellation of a tropical cyclone or rainstorm warning, employers should be sympathetic and handle each case flexibly. For example, employers may allow employees to resume work in stages, permit employees who have difficulties in returning to workplaces to work remotely (if applicable) or allow more time for them to report for duty and resume work," an LD spokesman said.

The spokesman reminded employers to observe the statutory liabilities and requirements under the Employment Ordinance, Occupational Safety and Health Ordinance, Factories and Industrial Undertakings Ordinance, Employees' Compensation Ordinance and Minimum Wage Ordinance.

"As natural calamities cannot be avoided, for employees who are not able to report for duty or resume duty on time due to adverse weather or 'extreme conditions', employers should neither deduct their wages, good attendance bonus or allowances, nor reduce employees' entitlement to annual leave, statutory holidays or rest days under the Employment Ordinance, or ask for additional hours of work from employees to compensate for the loss of working hours when they are unable to report for duty," the spokesman said.

Employers should note that they have an obligation to provide and maintain a safe working environment for their employees under the Occupational Safety and Health Ordinance. Moreover, under the Employees' Compensation Ordinance, employers are liable to pay compensation for injuries or deaths incurred when employees are travelling by a direct route from their residence to their workplace, or from their workplace back to their residence after work, four hours before or after working hours on a day when Tropical Cyclone Warning Signal No. 8 or higher, a Red or Black Rainstorm Warning Signal or "extreme conditions" is in force.

The LD has published the "Code of Practice in Times of Adverse Weather and 'Extreme Conditions'", which provides the major principles, reference guidelines and information on relevant legislation on making work arrangements for the reference of employers and employees. The booklet can be obtained from branch offices of the Labour Relations Division or downloaded from the department's webpage (www.labour.gov.hk/eng/public/wcp/Rainstorm.pdf).

Source: AI-generated images

Source: AI-generated images

Hong Kong Customs seizes suspected dangerous drugs worth about $20 million in anti-narcotics operation

Hong Kong Customsconducted an anti-narcotics operation between July 4 and yesterday (July 17), and detected six dangerous drugs cases using local co-working spaces and one passenger drug trafficking case at Hong Kong International Airport, seizing a total of about 31 kilograms of suspected methamphetamine and about 5kg of suspected cocaine with an estimated market value of about $20 million.

Through risk assessment, Customs on July 4 inspected an air cargo consignment, declared as a seating chair, arriving in Hong Kong from the United States at the airport. The consignee address was a co-working space on Hong Kong Island. Upon inspection, Customs officers found about 5kg of suspected methamphetamine concealed in the seating chair. Customs revealed that the drug traffickers have attempted to deliver consignments with dangerous drugs to different co-working spaces to evade Customs detection.

After a follow-up investigation, Customs officers found that the consignor concerned adopted the same approach to arrange for five different co-working spaces to receive other consignments, declared as seating chairs and baby toys, arriving in Hong Kong from the United States. The consignment was intercepted on July 5 at the airport and about 20kg of suspected methamphetamine were found concealed in four seating chairs, and about 5kg of suspected cocaine were found concealed in two baby toys. In the six dangerous drugs cases, in which local co-working spaces were being used, Customs seized about 25kg of suspected methamphetamine and about 5kg of suspected cocaine, with a total estimated market value of about $17 million..

After a follow-up investigation, Customs officers conducted a controlled delivery operation yesterday in Wong Chuk Hang and arrested one male consignee, aged 38. The arrested person has been charged with one count of trafficking in a dangerous drug. He will appear at the Eastern Magistrates' Courts tomorrow (July 19).

​In addition, Hong Kong Customs yesterday detected a passenger drug trafficking case at Hong Kong International Airport and seized about 6kg of suspected methamphetamine with an estimated market value of about $3 million.

A 23-year-old male passenger arrived in Hong Kong from Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, yesterday. During Customs clearance, Customs officers found six bags of suspected methamphetamine, with a total weight of about 6kg, inside his check-in suitcase. The passenger was subsequently arrested.

The arrested man has been charged with one count of trafficking in a dangerous drug. He will appear at the West Kowloon Magistrates' Courts tomorrow.

Customs will continue to step up enforcement against drug trafficking activities through intelligence analysis. The department also reminds members of the public to stay alert and not participate in drug trafficking activities for monetary return. They must not accept hiring or delegation from another party to carry controlled items into and out of Hong Kong. They are also reminded not to carry unknown items for other people, nor to release their personal data or home address to others for receiving parcels or goods.

Under the Dangerous Drugs Ordinance, trafficking in a dangerous drug is a serious offence. The maximum penalty upon conviction is a fine of $5 million and life imprisonment.

Members of the public may report any suspected drug trafficking activities to Customs' 24-hour hotline 2545 6182 or its dedicated crime reporting email account (crimereport@customs.gov.hk) or online form (eform.cefs.gov.hk/form/ced002).

Hong Kong Customs seizes suspected dangerous drugs worth about $20 million in anti-narcotics operation    Source: HKSAR Government Press Releases

Hong Kong Customs seizes suspected dangerous drugs worth about $20 million in anti-narcotics operation Source: HKSAR Government Press Releases

Hong Kong Customs seizes suspected dangerous drugs worth about $20 million in anti-narcotics operation    Source: HKSAR Government Press Releases

Hong Kong Customs seizes suspected dangerous drugs worth about $20 million in anti-narcotics operation Source: HKSAR Government Press Releases

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