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Garrett Crochet weaves a gem with 13 strikeouts and White Sox top Mariners 3-2 in 10 innings

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Garrett Crochet weaves a gem with 13 strikeouts and White Sox top Mariners 3-2 in 10 innings
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News

Garrett Crochet weaves a gem with 13 strikeouts and White Sox top Mariners 3-2 in 10 innings

2024-06-14 13:06 Last Updated At:13:10

SEATTLE (AP) — Garrett Crochet struck out a career-high 13 over seven dominant innings, Andrew Vaughn homered and drove in the tiebreaking run in the 10th, and the Chicago White Sox beat the Seattle Mariners 3-2 on Thursday night.

Chicago avoided being swept in the four-game series, but needed extra innings after Seattle star Julio Rodríguez tied it at 2 in the bottom of the ninth with a solo homer off closer Michael Kopech. Rodríguez laid off a couple of high fastballs from Kopech (2-6) and drove a 3-1 pitch to right-center for his sixth home run.

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Seattle Mariners' Tyler Locklear celebrates in the dugout after hitting a solo home run on a pitch from Chicago White Sox pitcher Garrett Crochet during the fifth inning of a baseball game, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Seattle. (AP Photo/John Froschauer)

SEATTLE (AP) — Garrett Crochet struck out a career-high 13 over seven dominant innings, Andrew Vaughn homered and drove in the tiebreaking run in the 10th, and the Chicago White Sox beat the Seattle Mariners 3-2 on Thursday night.

Seattle Mariners starting pitcher Emerson Hancock throws to a Chicago White Sox batter during the first inning of a baseball game, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Seattle. (AP Photo/John Froschauer)

Seattle Mariners starting pitcher Emerson Hancock throws to a Chicago White Sox batter during the first inning of a baseball game, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Seattle. (AP Photo/John Froschauer)

Chicago White Sox's Andrew Vaughn hits a solo home run off Seattle Mariners starting pitcher Emerson Hancock during the third inning of a baseball game Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Seattle. (AP Photo/John Froschauer)

Chicago White Sox's Andrew Vaughn hits a solo home run off Seattle Mariners starting pitcher Emerson Hancock during the third inning of a baseball game Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Seattle. (AP Photo/John Froschauer)

Chicago White Sox's Luis Robert Jr. hits a solo home run off Seattle Mariners starting pitcher Emerson Hancock during the third inning of a baseball game, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Seattle. (AP Photo/John Froschauer)

Chicago White Sox's Luis Robert Jr. hits a solo home run off Seattle Mariners starting pitcher Emerson Hancock during the third inning of a baseball game, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Seattle. (AP Photo/John Froschauer)

Chicago White Sox pitcher Garrett Crochet winds up to throw to a Seattle Mariners batter during the seventh inning of a baseball game Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Seattle. (AP Photo/John Froschauer)

Chicago White Sox pitcher Garrett Crochet winds up to throw to a Seattle Mariners batter during the seventh inning of a baseball game Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Seattle. (AP Photo/John Froschauer)

Chicago White Sox pitcher Garrett Crochet throws to a Seattle Mariners batter during the first inning of a baseball game Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Seattle. (AP Photo/John Froschauer)

Chicago White Sox pitcher Garrett Crochet throws to a Seattle Mariners batter during the first inning of a baseball game Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Seattle. (AP Photo/John Froschauer)

Andrés Muñoz (2-3) pitched the 10th for Seattle, just his second outing since June 4 when lower back issues popped up. He gave up a one-out single to Nicky Lopez that sent automatic runner Korey Lee from second base to third. Lee scored on Vaughn’s groundout, a chopper to third.

Tanner Banks worked a perfect inning for his second save. Chicago pitchers finished with 19 strikeouts, their most in a game since 2019.

“We actually played four really good baseball games here. It's a shame we were 1-3, but we're leaving here with a win,” manager Pedro Grifol said.

For most of the night, Crochet was the story. Relying almost entirely on his fastball and cutter, the 24-year-old lefty allowed two hits and struck out double-digit batters for the third time in his last four starts. During that four-game span, Crochet has allowed five earned runs and struck out 42.

Crochet’s 13 strikeouts were the most by a White Sox pitcher since Lance Lynn had 16 also against Seattle on June 18, 2023. Crochet's one big mistake came in the fifth when rookie Tyler Locklear golfed a changeup out to left field for his first career home run.

It was the only changeup Crochet threw among his 102 pitches, according to MLB Statcast data. The rest were fastballs and cutters.

“I think they just protect each other well," Crochet said of the two pitches. "My heater is fairly straight but has a little bit of cut sometimes. So I think that they look very similar up until the last 5 feet from the plate. That's kind of allowed it to be its own weapon.”

Seattle starter Emerson Hancock tossed a career-high seven innings and allowed six hits, but the White Sox capitalized on the two costly mistakes he made to two of their most dangerous hitters.

Vaughn hit his eighth homer with one out in the third. Three pitches later, Luis Robert Jr. went deep for the second straight night. Robert had a pinch-hit homer in the ninth inning on Wednesday that tied the game at 1 before Seattle won in extra innings. The White Sox have homered in 14 straight games.

Hancock made a spot start to give the rest of Seattle’s rotation an extra day of rest.

“Can't say enough about our pitching, defense. We just got shut down tonight,” Seattle manager Scott Servais said. "Their starter was obviously really good."

ROSTER UPDATES

White Sox: OF Eloy Jiménez is set to begin a rehab assignment in the Arizona Complex League. Jiménez has been out since May 21 with a hamstring injury.

Mariners: Dylan Moore was reinstated from the paternity list. RHP Brett de Geus and INF Leo Rivas were optioned to Triple-A Tacoma.

UP NEXT

White Sox: RHP Chris Flexen (2-5, 5.06 ERA) will start the opener of a three-game series in Arizona. Flexen has a 3.00 ERA and opponents are hitting .176 over his last three starts.

Mariners: After an extra day of rest, RHP Luis Castillo (5-7, 3.35 ERA) will start Friday’s series opener vs. Texas. Castillo allowed two runs over six innings in a victory against the Rangers on April 25.

AP MLB: https://apnews.com/hub/mlb

Seattle Mariners' Tyler Locklear celebrates in the dugout after hitting a solo home run on a pitch from Chicago White Sox pitcher Garrett Crochet during the fifth inning of a baseball game, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Seattle. (AP Photo/John Froschauer)

Seattle Mariners' Tyler Locklear celebrates in the dugout after hitting a solo home run on a pitch from Chicago White Sox pitcher Garrett Crochet during the fifth inning of a baseball game, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Seattle. (AP Photo/John Froschauer)

Seattle Mariners starting pitcher Emerson Hancock throws to a Chicago White Sox batter during the first inning of a baseball game, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Seattle. (AP Photo/John Froschauer)

Seattle Mariners starting pitcher Emerson Hancock throws to a Chicago White Sox batter during the first inning of a baseball game, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Seattle. (AP Photo/John Froschauer)

Chicago White Sox's Andrew Vaughn hits a solo home run off Seattle Mariners starting pitcher Emerson Hancock during the third inning of a baseball game Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Seattle. (AP Photo/John Froschauer)

Chicago White Sox's Andrew Vaughn hits a solo home run off Seattle Mariners starting pitcher Emerson Hancock during the third inning of a baseball game Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Seattle. (AP Photo/John Froschauer)

Chicago White Sox's Luis Robert Jr. hits a solo home run off Seattle Mariners starting pitcher Emerson Hancock during the third inning of a baseball game, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Seattle. (AP Photo/John Froschauer)

Chicago White Sox's Luis Robert Jr. hits a solo home run off Seattle Mariners starting pitcher Emerson Hancock during the third inning of a baseball game, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Seattle. (AP Photo/John Froschauer)

Chicago White Sox pitcher Garrett Crochet winds up to throw to a Seattle Mariners batter during the seventh inning of a baseball game Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Seattle. (AP Photo/John Froschauer)

Chicago White Sox pitcher Garrett Crochet winds up to throw to a Seattle Mariners batter during the seventh inning of a baseball game Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Seattle. (AP Photo/John Froschauer)

Chicago White Sox pitcher Garrett Crochet throws to a Seattle Mariners batter during the first inning of a baseball game Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Seattle. (AP Photo/John Froschauer)

Chicago White Sox pitcher Garrett Crochet throws to a Seattle Mariners batter during the first inning of a baseball game Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Seattle. (AP Photo/John Froschauer)

TALLINN, Estonia (AP) — Over the past decade, Russia has seen a sharp increase in treason and espionage cases.

Lawyers and experts say prosecutions for these high crimes started to grow after 2014 — the year that Russia illegally annexed the Crimean Peninsula from Ukraine. That’s also when Moscow backed a separatist insurgency in eastern Ukraine.

The number of treason and espionage cases in Russia really spiked after the Kremlin sent troops into Ukraine in February 2022, and President Vladimir Putin urged the security services to “harshly suppress the actions of foreign intelligence services (and) promptly identify traitors, spies and saboteurs.” The crackdown has ensnared scientists and journalists, as well as ordinary citizens.

A look at some treason cases prosecuted in Russia in recent years:

In April 2008, bakery worker Oksana Sevastidi saw military equipment on the railway near Sochi, the Russian Black Sea resort where she lived. She texted a friend who lived in neighboring Georgia about it. Weeks later, in August, the two countries fought a brief war, which ended with Moscow recognizing South Ossetia and another Georgian province, Abkhazia, as independent states and bolstering its military presence there.

Sevastidi was arrested in 2015, stemming from her text messages, and convicted of treason the following year. The case made national headlines after Ivan Pavlov and Evgeny Smirnov, prominent lawyers specializing in treason cases, took it on in 2016. That same year, Pavlov’s team revealed that several other Sochi women were convicted of treason in eerily similar cases.

President Vladimir Putin was asked about Sevastidi at his annual news conference in December 2016. He called her sentence “harsh” and promised to look into it, saying that “she wrote what she saw” in her texts and that it didn’t constitute a state secret. In 2017, Putin pardoned Sevastidi and two other women.

Ivan Safronov, a former journalist who went on to work for the Russian space agency Roscosmos, was arrested in 2020 and accused of passing military secrets to Czech intelligence and a German national. In September 2022, a court in Moscow convicted him of treason and sentenced him to 22 years in prison.

Safronov rose to prominence as a military affairs reporter for Kommersant, a leading business newspaper. He vehemently rejected the charges against him, arguing that he collected all the information from open sources as part of his journalistic work and did nothing illegal.

Colleagues denounced the verdict as unfounded and pushed for Safronov’s release, suggesting authorities may have wanted to punish him for his reporting about military and space incidents and arms deals.

His fiancee, Ksenia Mironova, told The Associated Press that she believes such treason cases, which are investigated in secret with trials held behind closed doors, are convenient for law enforcement because their accusations can go unchallenged:

“They don’t have to explain anything to anyone at all. Not that they bother anyway. … But (with open trials), there is still a chance that some unfortunate journalists will come and write something. With treason, the case is closed, and they can just concoct something, and that’s it,” said Mironova, who also is a journalist and has reported on the rise of treason prosecutions.

Valery Golubkin, now 71, was a physicist specializing in aerodynamics when he was arrested in 2021 and convicted of treason in June 2023. He was sentenced to 12 years in a maximum-security prison.

According to his lawyers, the authorities accused Golubkin of sharing state secrets with a foreign country. The scientist and his defense team argued that he merely submitted research reports on an international project of a hypersonic civilian aircraft that his state-run institute was involved in.

The reports didn’t contain state secrets and were vetted in accordance with regulations before they were sent abroad, according to lawyer Smirnov.

In a letter from behind bars to the Russian news outlet RBK in 2021, Golubkin said the project in question was approved by the Trade Ministry, and that the charges against him are based on the testimony of his supervisor, Anatoly Gubanov, who was arrested several months before Golubkin.

Gubanov, 66, also was convicted of treason and sentenced to 12 years in prison in 2023.

Lawyers for Golubkin appealed his verdict and lost. In April 2024, the Supreme Court overturned the ruling on the appeal and ordered another review of it, but in the end, the original sentence was upheld.

His daughter, Lyudmila Golubkina, told AP that neither the family nor Golubkin have had high expectations after the Supreme Court ruling, and they now hope he can be released on parole after serving two-thirds of his sentence.

“When a person has something to live for, a goal, it helps them to overcome everything,” she said. “I hope we will still get to see him a free man.”

Igor Pokusin, a 62-year-old retired pilot who was born in Ukraine, was arrested in the southern Siberian city of Abakan, for protesting Russia's 2022 invasion of his native land. He was convicted of vandalism and sentenced to six months of parole-like restrictions.

He later was arrested again on the more serious charge of “preparing for treason,” according to the First Department, a rights group that investigates treason cases.

The charges against him stemmed from his phone calls to relatives and friends in which he mulled moving to Ukraine and volunteering as a pilot there to ferry the wounded or deliver humanitarian aid, according to the rights group and media reports.

In January 2024, Pokusin was convicted of the “preparing for treason” charge and sentenced to eight years in prison. The First Department said he died behind bars in June.

Advocates from Memorial, Russia’s oldest and most prominent human rights group, have declared Pokusin, Sevastidi, Safronov and a number of others accused of treason to be designated as political prisoners.

FILE - In this photo released by the Moscow City Court Press Service, Valery Golubkin, a physicist specializing in aerodynamics, stands in a defendant’s cage in court in Moscow, Russia, on Monday, June 26, 2023. Golubkin, 71, was arrested in 2021 and convicted of treason in 2023 and sentenced to 12 years in prison. Authorities accused him of passing state secrets abroad, but he and his lawyers insisted that he merely submitted research reports on an international project that didn’t contain any state secrets and were cleared for submission. (Moscow City Court Press Service via AP, File)

FILE - In this photo released by the Moscow City Court Press Service, Valery Golubkin, a physicist specializing in aerodynamics, stands in a defendant’s cage in court in Moscow, Russia, on Monday, June 26, 2023. Golubkin, 71, was arrested in 2021 and convicted of treason in 2023 and sentenced to 12 years in prison. Authorities accused him of passing state secrets abroad, but he and his lawyers insisted that he merely submitted research reports on an international project that didn’t contain any state secrets and were cleared for submission. (Moscow City Court Press Service via AP, File)

FILE - Ivan Safronov, an adviser to the director of Russia's state space agency, stands in a defendant’s cage in a courtroom in Moscow, Russia, on Thursday, July 16, 2020. Safronov, a former military affairs journalist, was convicted of treason and sentenced to 22 years in prison. Authorities accused him of passing military secrets to Czech intelligence and a German national, which he denied. The case has been widely viewed as retaliation for his reporting. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko, File)

FILE - Ivan Safronov, an adviser to the director of Russia's state space agency, stands in a defendant’s cage in a courtroom in Moscow, Russia, on Thursday, July 16, 2020. Safronov, a former military affairs journalist, was convicted of treason and sentenced to 22 years in prison. Authorities accused him of passing military secrets to Czech intelligence and a German national, which he denied. The case has been widely viewed as retaliation for his reporting. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko, File)

FILE - Ivan Safronov, an adviser to the director of Russia's state space agency, greets journalists while standing in a defendant’s cage in a courtroom in Moscow, Russia, Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2020, with two Federal Security Service officers sitting nearby. Safronov, a former military affairs journalist, was convicted of treason and sentenced to 22 years in prison. Authorities accused him of passing military secrets to Czech intelligence and a German national, which he denied. The case has been widely viewed as retaliation for his reporting. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko, File)

FILE - Ivan Safronov, an adviser to the director of Russia's state space agency, greets journalists while standing in a defendant’s cage in a courtroom in Moscow, Russia, Tuesday, Sept. 15, 2020, with two Federal Security Service officers sitting nearby. Safronov, a former military affairs journalist, was convicted of treason and sentenced to 22 years in prison. Authorities accused him of passing military secrets to Czech intelligence and a German national, which he denied. The case has been widely viewed as retaliation for his reporting. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko, File)

FILE - Oksana Sevastidi with her lawyers Evgeny Smirnov, right, and Ivan Pavlov, awaits a court hearing in Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, March 15, 2017. Sevastidi, a bakery worker in the Black Sea resort of Sochi, was convicted of treason and sentenced to seven years in prison after she sent a text message to a friend in neighboring Georgia about seeing military equipment carried on a nearby railway prior to Russia’s brief war in 2008 with its neighbor. President Vladimir Putin pardoned her in 2017. (AP Photo, File)

FILE - Oksana Sevastidi with her lawyers Evgeny Smirnov, right, and Ivan Pavlov, awaits a court hearing in Moscow, Russia, Wednesday, March 15, 2017. Sevastidi, a bakery worker in the Black Sea resort of Sochi, was convicted of treason and sentenced to seven years in prison after she sent a text message to a friend in neighboring Georgia about seeing military equipment carried on a nearby railway prior to Russia’s brief war in 2008 with its neighbor. President Vladimir Putin pardoned her in 2017. (AP Photo, File)

FILE - Oksana Sevastidi leaves Lefortovo Prison in Moscow, Russia, on Sunday, March 12, 2017. Sevastidi, a bakery worker in the Black Sea resort of Sochi, was convicted of treason and sentenced to seven years in prison after she sent a text message to a friend in neighboring Georgia about seeing military equipment carried on a nearby railway prior to Russia’s brief war in 2008 with its neighbor. President Vladimir Putin pardoned her in 2017. (AP Photo/Denis Tyrin, File)

FILE - Oksana Sevastidi leaves Lefortovo Prison in Moscow, Russia, on Sunday, March 12, 2017. Sevastidi, a bakery worker in the Black Sea resort of Sochi, was convicted of treason and sentenced to seven years in prison after she sent a text message to a friend in neighboring Georgia about seeing military equipment carried on a nearby railway prior to Russia’s brief war in 2008 with its neighbor. President Vladimir Putin pardoned her in 2017. (AP Photo/Denis Tyrin, File)

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