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Residents, communities preparing for heat wave that will envelop Midwest, Northeast next week

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Residents, communities preparing for heat wave that will envelop Midwest, Northeast next week
News

News

Residents, communities preparing for heat wave that will envelop Midwest, Northeast next week

2024-06-15 22:06 Last Updated At:22:11

Things are about to heat up in much of the U.S. with dangerously hot temperatures in the Midwest and Northeast next week, prompting health officials to urge people to make plans now to stay safe.

The heat wave follows an earlier-than-usual one in the Southwest last week, which saw triple-digit temperatures in cities like Phoenix, where there were 645 heat-related deaths last year.

Last year the U.S. had the most heat waves — abnormally hot weather lasting more than two days — since 1936. In the South and Southwest, last year was the worst on record, according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

The next heat wave will ramp up Sunday in the center of the country before spreading eastward, the National Weather Service said, with some areas likely to see extreme heat in reaching daily records. The heat wave could last all week and into the weekend in many places.

Here are some things to know:

WHAT AREAS WILL SEE EXTREME HEAT?

There will be areas of extreme heat — when there's little or no overnight relief — from eastern Kansas to Maine, according to a National Weather Service heat risk map. Heat will build over the Plains states on Sunday, where there will be extreme heat by Monday that spreads eastward into the Great Lakes states and Northeast.

Temperatures will be in the mid- to high-90s in many areas and likely will be at daily records in the Ohio Valley and Northeast, with the dew point making some areas feel as hot as 105 degrees Fahrenheit (41 degrees Celsius), the weather service said.

It'll be the Detroit metro area's worst heat wave in 20 years or more, with temperatures forecasted in the mid-90s and heat indices around 100 F (38 C) starting Monday and potentially lasting into the weekend, National Weather Service meteorologist Steven Freitag said. There's a chance the area could see its first 100-degree day since July 2012.

Although nighttime temperatures will dip into the 70s, providing some relief, the duration of the heat can have a cumulative and potentially dangerous effect on the body, Freitag said.

WHAT ARE THE DANGERS OF EXTREME HEAT?

Heat-related illness can be deadly if not recognized and treated early, and often starts with muscle cramps or spasms, experts say. Heat exhaustion and heat stroke could follow.

Young children and infants, pregnant women, the elderly and people with chronic medical conditions are especially vulnerable, as are those who can't get around well or who live alone.

Symptoms of heat exhaustion may include heavy sweating and fatigue; a weak pulse; skin that's cool, pale or clammy; and headache, dizziness, nausea and fainting. The person should be moved to an air-conditioned space and offered sips of water. Loosen their clothing and apply cool, wet cloths or put them in a cool bath. Seek medical help if they vomit.

A person suffering heat stroke may experience headache, confusion, nausea, dizziness and a body temperature above 103 F (39.4 C). They also may have hot, red dry or damp skin; rapid pulse and faint or lose consciousness. The CDC advises people to call 911 immediately and, while waiting for help, use cool cloths or a cool bath and move them to an air-conditioned space, but do not give them anything to drink.

HOW CAN YOU STAY SAFE?

Stay indoors in an air-conditioned space and limit outdoor activities, experts said. If you don't have air conditioning, find out if your community will open cooling centers. But even those with air conditioning should plan ahead in the event of a power outage, said Freitag, from the National Weather Service. Limit outdoor activities to the morning or, better yet, don't go outside, he said.

Other tips from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

Communities also can prepare by opening cooling centers in places like schools and libraries. Some also send text messages to residents or have hotlines that people can call for help.

In Franklin County, Ohio, the office on aging is distributing fans to residents 60 and older, spokeswoman Kristin Howard said.

And some businesses whose employees work outside say they will start earlier to avoid the worst heat.

“When you get this sort of heat, any outdoor activities has to be a short duration (preferably) ... in the early morning hours,” said Freitag. “But otherwise, there really shouldn’t be any outdoor activity with physical exertion during the peak of the day.”

Tiger Woods wipes his face on the 16th hole during weather warnings in second round of the U.S. Open golf tournament Friday, June 14, 2024, in Pinehurst, N.C. (AP Photo/Mike Stewart)

Tiger Woods wipes his face on the 16th hole during weather warnings in second round of the U.S. Open golf tournament Friday, June 14, 2024, in Pinehurst, N.C. (AP Photo/Mike Stewart)

An aerials skiing athlete jumps at the Eccles Olympic Freestyle Pool on Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Park City, Utah. US Ski and Snowboard athletes train during the summer offseason to prepare for winter competition. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

An aerials skiing athlete jumps at the Eccles Olympic Freestyle Pool on Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Park City, Utah. US Ski and Snowboard athletes train during the summer offseason to prepare for winter competition. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

A kid runs splashing water at the Centennial Olympic Park fountains as temperatures rise in Atlanta, Thursday, June 13, 2024. According to the National Weather Service, the temperatures will be in the upper 90s by the weekend. (Miguel Martinez/Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP)

A kid runs splashing water at the Centennial Olympic Park fountains as temperatures rise in Atlanta, Thursday, June 13, 2024. According to the National Weather Service, the temperatures will be in the upper 90s by the weekend. (Miguel Martinez/Atlanta Journal-Constitution via AP)

A man on a bike photographs the sunset at the Great Salt Lake Thursday June 13, 2024, near Salt Lake City. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

A man on a bike photographs the sunset at the Great Salt Lake Thursday June 13, 2024, near Salt Lake City. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

PLAINFIELD, Vt. (AP) — Vermont is seeking an assessment to determine whether last week’s flooding, which damaged homes, knocked down bridges and washed out roads, qualifies for a federal disaster declaration and aid.

The flooding from the remnants of Hurricane Beryl happened a year after the state experienced catastrophic flooding that left some victims still awaiting home buyouts or repairs.

“We know this storm has done tremendous damage in many communities, and those impacted will need help to recover," Gov. Phil Scott said in a statement Saturday. “That’s why it’s so critical for Vermonters to report their damage to help us demonstrate the need for these federal resources.”

Two people were killed by the flooding, including a motorist in Lyndonville and a man who was riding an all-terrain vehicle in Peacham, authorities said.

Some of the hardest-hit riverside communities were Barre, Hardwick, Lyndonville, Moretown and Plainfield, but the estimated $15 million in damage to roads and other public infrastructure was more widespread. Damage assessments will be done in eight of Vermont's 14 counties. A public assistance disaster declaration would provide 75% reimbursement to communities for responding to and repairing public infrastructure damaged by the storm, the governor said.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency must verify at least $1.1 million in response and public infrastructure recovery costs for the state to qualify for a major disaster declaration, according to Scott. For counties to qualify, they must show damages of $4.60 per capita, Scott's office said.

An individual assistance declaration would give some financial assistance to homeowners and renters for property losses, the governor said. They are encouraged to report property losses by calling 211 or visiting www.vermont211.org.

Even though Vermont is an inland state, it's suffered damage from tropical storm systems. In 2011, Tropical Storm Irene dumped 11 inches (28 centimeters) of rain on parts of the state in 24 hours. The storm killed six in the state, washed homes off their foundations and damaged or destroyed more than 200 bridges and 500 miles (800 kilometers) of highway.

In May, Vermont became the first state to enact a law requiring fossil fuel companies to pay a share of the damage caused by extreme weather fanned by climate change. But officials acknowledged last week that collecting any money will depend on litigation against a much-better-resourced oil industry.

Signs are displayed outside the town hall, Sunday, July 14, 2024, in Plainfield, Vt., a community that had some of the worst damage in last week's flooding. (AP Photo/Lisa Rathke)

Signs are displayed outside the town hall, Sunday, July 14, 2024, in Plainfield, Vt., a community that had some of the worst damage in last week's flooding. (AP Photo/Lisa Rathke)

FILE - The remains of an eight unit apartment building that locals call the Heartbreak Hotel are in Plainfield, Vermont, on July 12, 2024, after flood waters and debris caused by the aftermath of Hurricane Beryl pulled several of the apartments into the Great Brook waterway. Vermont is seeking a federal assessment to determine whether last week’s flooding, which damaged homes, knocked out bridges and washed out roads, qualifies for a federal disaster declaration and aid. (AP Photo/Ted Shaffrey, file)

FILE - The remains of an eight unit apartment building that locals call the Heartbreak Hotel are in Plainfield, Vermont, on July 12, 2024, after flood waters and debris caused by the aftermath of Hurricane Beryl pulled several of the apartments into the Great Brook waterway. Vermont is seeking a federal assessment to determine whether last week’s flooding, which damaged homes, knocked out bridges and washed out roads, qualifies for a federal disaster declaration and aid. (AP Photo/Ted Shaffrey, file)

FILE - An overwhelmed residents surveys the damage following flooding caused by the remnants of Hurricane Beryl, July 11, 2024, in Plainfield, Vt. Vermont is seeking a federal assessment to determine whether last week’s flooding, which damaged homes, knocked out bridges and washed out roads, qualifies for a federal disaster declaration and aid. (AP Photo/Dmitry Belyakov, file)

FILE - An overwhelmed residents surveys the damage following flooding caused by the remnants of Hurricane Beryl, July 11, 2024, in Plainfield, Vt. Vermont is seeking a federal assessment to determine whether last week’s flooding, which damaged homes, knocked out bridges and washed out roads, qualifies for a federal disaster declaration and aid. (AP Photo/Dmitry Belyakov, file)

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