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Aviva McPherron Joins Orthofix as President of Global Operations and Quality

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Aviva McPherron Joins Orthofix as President of Global Operations and Quality
News

News

Aviva McPherron Joins Orthofix as President of Global Operations and Quality

2024-06-18 19:00 Last Updated At:19:10

LEWISVILLE, Texas--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Jun 18, 2024--

Orthofix Medical Inc. (NASDAQ:OFIX), a leading global spine and orthopedics company, today announced the appointment of Aviva McPherron as President of Global Operations and Quality. As a member of the Executive Leadership Team, McPherron will oversee strategy for the company’s operations, manufacturing, regulatory, clinical, and quality teams.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20240618902092/en/

McPherron joins Orthofix from Globus Medical where she served as Senior Vice President, Clinical Services and Integration and was responsible for strategic initiatives to drive growth and enhance profitability. In this role McPherron also led the integration planning and execution for the merger of Globus Medical and NuVasive Inc. Prior to Globus Medical, McPherron served in roles of increasing responsibility for NuVasive Inc., including Chief Transformation Officer where she led the strategy to transform the commercial and operational processes, portfolio, and back-office organization to drive profitability across the company.

“We are pleased to have Aviva join our leadership team,” said Orthofix President and CEO Massimo Calafiore. “Her experience and background will be an asset to our strong operations, clinical, regulatory and quality teams to help drive strategies that deliver operational efficiencies and gross margin improvements, both of which are critical to achieving the value of our merger.”

Prior to Globus Medical and NuVasive Inc., McPherron held a variety of leadership roles across technology and defense industries.

“The merger of Orthofix and SeaSpine has the company well-positioned for growth and success, and I am excited to be joining this talented team,” said McPherron. “I look forward to working with the team to foster better coordination and optimization across the company’s operational processes to ensure the best quality products are available for surgeons and their patients.”

McPherron has a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University. She serves on the Sharp Healthcare IT Advisory Board and as a member of the San Diego Mesa College Foundation Board.

As an inducement to enter into employment with Orthofix, McPherron was granted (i) performance-based vesting restricted stock units that settle into 59,666 shares of common stock at target achievement, (ii) time-based vesting restricted stock units that settle into 29,833 shares of common stock, and (iii) stock options to purchase 68,638 shares of common stock. The performance-based vesting restricted stock units vest at the end of a three-year performance period based on the Company’s total stockholder return relative to an industry peer group index during such period, while the time-based vesting restricted stock units vest in equal tranches over three years. The stock options vest upon achievement of both service- and performance-based criteria, whichever is the later of (a) the date certain service-based conditions are met (which will be met over three years) and (b) the date that the average closing price of the Company’s common stock over a one-month calendar period has been equal to or great than 150% of the closing price of the Company’s common stock on the grant date. The grants, which were approved by Orthofix’s Board of Directors, were made under standalone inducement award agreements approved pursuant to NASDAQ Marketplace Rule 5635(c)(4).

About Orthofix

Orthofix is a leading global spine and orthopedics company with a comprehensive portfolio of biologics, innovative spinal hardware, bone growth therapies, specialized orthopedic solutions, and a leading surgical navigation system. Its products are distributed in more than 60 countries worldwide. The Company is headquartered in Lewisville, Texas, where it conducts general business, product development, medical education and manufacturing, and has primary offices in Carlsbad, CA, with a focus on spine and biologics product innovation and surgeon education, and Verona, Italy, with an emphasis on product innovation, production, and medical education for orthopedics. The combined Company’s global R&D, commercial and manufacturing footprint also includes facilities and offices in Irvine, CA, Toronto, Canada, Sunnyvale, CA, Maidenhead, UK, Munich, Germany, Paris, France and São Paulo, Brazil.

Forward-Looking Statements

This news release may include forward-looking statements within the meaning of Section 21E of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and Section 27A of the Securities Act of 1933, as amended. In some cases, you can identify forward-looking statements by terminology such as “may,” “will,” “should,” “expects,” “plans,” “anticipates,” “believes,” “estimates,” “projects,” “intends,” “predicts,” “potential,” “continue” or other comparable terminology. Orthofix cautions you that statements included in this news release that are not a description of historical facts are forward-looking statements that are based on the Company’s current expectations and assumptions. Each forward-looking statement contained in this news release is subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from those expressed or implied by such statement. Applicable risks and uncertainties include, among others: the ability of newly launched products to perform as designed and intended and to meet the needs of surgeons and patients, including as a result of the lack of robust clinical validation; and the risks identified under the heading “Risk Factors” in Orthofix Medical Inc.’s Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended December 31, 2023, which was filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) on March 5, 2024. The Company’s public filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission are available at www.sec.gov. You are cautioned not to place undue reliance on forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date when made. Orthofix does not intend to revise or update any forward-looking statement set forth in this news release to reflect events or circumstances arising after the date hereof, except as may be required by law.

Aviva McPherron, President of Global Operations and Quality at Orthofix Medical Inc. (Photo: Business Wire)

Aviva McPherron, President of Global Operations and Quality at Orthofix Medical Inc. (Photo: Business Wire)

Joe Biden's withdrawal from the U.S. presidential race injects greater uncertainty into the world at a time when Western leaders are grappling with wars in Ukraine and Gaza, a more assertive China in Asia and the rise of the far-right in Europe.

During a five-decade career in politics, Biden developed extensive personal relationships with multiple foreign leaders that none of the potential replacements on the Democratic ticket can match. After his announcement, messages of support and gratitude for his years of service poured in from near and far.

The scope of foreign policy challenges facing the next U.S. president makes clear how consequential what happens in Washington is for the rest of the planet. Here's a look at some of them.

With Vice President Kamala Harris being eyed as a potential replacement for Biden, Israelis on Sunday scrambled to understand what her candidacy would mean for their country as it confronts increasing global isolation over its military campaign against Hamas.

Israel’s left-wing Haaretz daily newspaper ran a story scrutinizing Harris’ record of support for Israel, pointing to her reputation as Biden’s “bad cop" who has vocally admonished Israel for its offensive in Gaza. In recent months, she has gone further than Biden in calling for a cease-fire, denouncing Israel's invasion of Rafah and expressing horror over the civilian death toll in Gaza.

“With Biden leaving, Israel has lost perhaps the last Zionist president,” said Alon Pinkas, a former Israeli consul general in New York. “A new Democratic candidate will upend the dynamic.”

Biden's staunch defense of Israel since Hamas' Oct. 7 attack has its roots in his half-century of support for the country as a senator, vice president, then president. Israeli Defense Minister Yoav Gallant thanked Biden for his “unwavering support of Israel over the years.”

“Your steadfast backing, especially during the war, has been invaluable,” Gallant wrote on X.

Israeli President Isaac Herzog praised Biden as a “symbol of the unbreakable bond between our two peoples" and a “true ally of the Jewish people.” There was no immediate reaction from Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, an ally of former President Donald Trump whose history of cordial relations with Biden has come under strain during the Israel-Hamas war.

Any Democratic candidate would likely continue Biden’s legacy of staunch military support for Ukraine. But frustration with the Biden administration has grown in Ukraine and Europe over the slow pace of U.S. aid and restrictions on the use of Western weapons.

“Most Europeans realize that Ukraine is increasingly going to be their burden,” said Sudha David-Wilp, director of the Berlin office of the German Marshall Fund, a research institute. “Everyone is trying to get ready for all the possible outcomes.”

Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy said on X that he respected the “tough but strong decision” by Biden to drop out of the campaign, and he thanked Biden for his help “in preventing (Russian President Vladimir) Putin from occupying our country.”

Trump has promised to end Russia's war on Ukraine in one day if he is elected — a prospect that has raised fears in Ukraine that Russia might be allowed to keep the territory it occupies.

Trump's vice presidential pick, Ohio Sen. JD Vance, is among Congress’ most vocal opponents of U.S. aid for Ukraine and has further raised the stakes for Kyiv.

Russia, meanwhile, dismissed the importance of the race, insisting that no matter what happened, Moscow would press on in Ukraine.

“We need to pay attention,” Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov was quoted as saying by a pro-Russian tabloid. “We need to watch what will happen and do our own thing."

In recent months, both Biden and Trump have tried to show voters who can best stand up to Beijing’s growing military strength and belligerence and protect U.S. businesses and workers from low-priced Chinese imports. Biden has hiked tariffs on electric vehicles from China, and Trump has promised to implement tariffs of 60% on all Chinese products.

Trump’s “America First” doctrine exacerbated tensions with Beijing. But disputes with the geopolitical rival and economic colossus over wars, trade, technology and security continued into Biden's term.

China's official reaction to the U.S. presidential race has been careful. The official Xinhua news agency treated the story of Biden’s decision as relatively minor. The editor of the party-run Global Times newspaper, Hu Xijin, downplayed the impact of Biden's withdrawal.

“Whoever becomes the presidential candidate of the Democratic Party may be the same," he wrote on X. “Voters are divided into two groups, Trump voters and Trump haters.”

With Iran's proxies across the Middle East increasingly entangled in the Israel-Hamas war, the U.S. confronts a region in disarray.

Yemen's Iran-backed Houthis struck Tel Aviv for the first time last week, prompting retaliatory Israeli strikes inside war-torn Yemen. Simmering tensions and cross-border attacks between Lebanon’s Iran-backed Hezbollah militant group and the Israeli military have raised fears of an all-out regional conflagration.

Hamas, which also receives support from Iran, continues to fight Israel even nine months into a war that has killed 38,000 Palestinians and displaced over 80% of Gaza's population.

The U.S. and its allies have accused Iran of expanding its nuclear program and enriching uranium to an unprecedented 60% level, near-weapons-grade levels.

After then-President Trump in 2018 withdrew from Tehran’s landmark nuclear deal with world powers, Biden said he wanted to reverse his predecessor's hawkish anti-Iran stance. But the Biden administration has maintained severe economic sanctions against Iran and overseen failed attempts to renegotiate the agreement.

The sudden death of Ebrahim Raisi — the supreme leader's hard-line protege — in a helicopter crash vaulted a new reformist to the presidency in Iran, generating new opportunities and risks. Masoud Pezeshkian has said he wants to help Iran open up to the world but has maintained a defiant tone against the U.S.

Many Europeans were happy to see Trump go after his years of disparaging the European Union and undermining NATO. Trump's seemingly dismissive attitude toward European allies in last month's presidential debate did nothing to assuage those concerns.

Biden, on the other hand, has supported close American relations with bloc leaders.

That closeness was on stark display after Biden's decision to bow out of the race. Polish Prime Minister Donald Tusk called his choice “probably the most difficult one in your life.” The newly installed British prime minister, Keir Starmer, said he respected Biden’s “decision based on what he believes is in the best interests of the American people.”

There was also an outpouring of affection from Irish Prime Minister Simon Harris, who called Biden a “proud American with an Irish soul."

The question of whether NATO can maintain its momentum in supporting Ukraine and checking the ambitions of other authoritarian states hangs in the balance of this presidential election, analysts say.

“They don't want to see Donald Trump as president. So there's quite a bit of relief but also quite a bit of nervousness" about Biden's decision to drop out, said Jeremy Shapiro, research director of the European Council on Foreign Relations. “Like many in the United States, but perhaps more so, they are really quite confused.”

The close relationship between Mexico and the U.S. has been marked in recent years by disagreements over trade, energy and climate change. Since President Andrés Manuel López Obrador took power in 2018, both countries have found common ground on issue of migration – with Mexico making it more difficult for migrants to cross its country to the U.S. border and the U.S. not pressing on other issues.

The López Obrador administration kept that policy while Trump was president and continued it into Biden's term.

On Friday, Mexico’s president called Trump “a friend” and said he would write to him to warn him against pledging to close the border or blaming migrants for bringing drugs into the United States.

“I am going to prove to him that migrants don’t carry drugs to the United States,” he said, adding that “closing the border won’t solve anything, and anyway, it can’t be done.”

Associated Press writers Jill Lawless in London, Daria Litvinova in Talinn, Estonia, and Josh Goodman in Miami contributed to this report.

FILE - Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese addresses the media at Parliament House in Canberra, Monday, June 17, 2024. As the Asia-Pacific region began to awaken to the news of Biden's withdrawal on Sunday, July 21, from the U.S. presidential race, another staunch U.S. ally, Australian Prime Minister Albanese, thanked Biden for his leadership and “ongoing service,” and noted the countries’ shared commitment to democratic values. (Lukas Coch/Pool Photo via AP, File)

FILE - Australian Prime Minister Anthony Albanese addresses the media at Parliament House in Canberra, Monday, June 17, 2024. As the Asia-Pacific region began to awaken to the news of Biden's withdrawal on Sunday, July 21, from the U.S. presidential race, another staunch U.S. ally, Australian Prime Minister Albanese, thanked Biden for his leadership and “ongoing service,” and noted the countries’ shared commitment to democratic values. (Lukas Coch/Pool Photo via AP, File)

FILE - Ireland's Prime Minister Simon Harris arrives to attend the European Political Community summit at Blenheim Palace in Woodstock, Oxfordshire, England, Thursday, July 18, 2024. U.S. President Joe Biden's withdrawal from the U.S. presidential race injects greater uncertainty into the world. There was an outpouring of affection from Ireland's Prime Minister Harris, who called Biden a "proud American with an Irish soul.” (Jacob King/Pool Photo via AP, File)

FILE - Ireland's Prime Minister Simon Harris arrives to attend the European Political Community summit at Blenheim Palace in Woodstock, Oxfordshire, England, Thursday, July 18, 2024. U.S. President Joe Biden's withdrawal from the U.S. presidential race injects greater uncertainty into the world. There was an outpouring of affection from Ireland's Prime Minister Harris, who called Biden a "proud American with an Irish soul.” (Jacob King/Pool Photo via AP, File)

FILE - Poland's Prime Minister Donald Tusk reacts during a bilateral meeting with Britain's Prime Minister Keir Starmer, at the European Political Community meeting, at Blenheim Palace in Woodstock, southern England, Thursday, July 18, 2024. U.S. President Joe Biden's withdrawal from the U.S. presidential race injects greater uncertainty into the world. (Justin Tallis/Pool Photo via AP, File)

FILE - Poland's Prime Minister Donald Tusk reacts during a bilateral meeting with Britain's Prime Minister Keir Starmer, at the European Political Community meeting, at Blenheim Palace in Woodstock, southern England, Thursday, July 18, 2024. U.S. President Joe Biden's withdrawal from the U.S. presidential race injects greater uncertainty into the world. (Justin Tallis/Pool Photo via AP, File)

FILE - President Joe Biden listens as Australia's Prime Minister Anthony Albanese speaks during a State Dinner at the White House, Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2023, in Washington. As the Asia-Pacific region began to awaken to the news of Biden's withdrawal from the U.S. presidential race, another staunch U.S. ally, Australian Prime Minister Albanese, thanked Biden for his leadership and “ongoing service,” and noted the countries’ shared commitment to democratic values. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

FILE - President Joe Biden listens as Australia's Prime Minister Anthony Albanese speaks during a State Dinner at the White House, Wednesday, Oct. 25, 2023, in Washington. As the Asia-Pacific region began to awaken to the news of Biden's withdrawal from the U.S. presidential race, another staunch U.S. ally, Australian Prime Minister Albanese, thanked Biden for his leadership and “ongoing service,” and noted the countries’ shared commitment to democratic values. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

FILE - President Joe Biden pumps his fist during a family photo at the NATO Summit, Wednesday, July 10, 2024, in Washington. Biden’s withdrawal from the U.S. presidential race on Sunday, July 21, injects greater uncertainty into the world at a time Western leaders are grappling with two complicated wars in Ukraine and Gaza, a more assertive China in Asia and the rise of the far-right in Europe that threatens to erode democratic norms. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

FILE - President Joe Biden pumps his fist during a family photo at the NATO Summit, Wednesday, July 10, 2024, in Washington. Biden’s withdrawal from the U.S. presidential race on Sunday, July 21, injects greater uncertainty into the world at a time Western leaders are grappling with two complicated wars in Ukraine and Gaza, a more assertive China in Asia and the rise of the far-right in Europe that threatens to erode democratic norms. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

FILE - Britain's Prime Minister Keir Starmer, left, looks on as U.S. President Joe Biden speaks, where he introduced Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy during an event on the Ukraine Compact at the NATO Summit at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center, in Washington, Thursday, July 11, 2024. Biden's withdrawal from the U.S. presidential race injects greater uncertainty into the world. (Stefan Rousseau/Pool Photo via AP, File)

FILE - Britain's Prime Minister Keir Starmer, left, looks on as U.S. President Joe Biden speaks, where he introduced Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskyy during an event on the Ukraine Compact at the NATO Summit at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center, in Washington, Thursday, July 11, 2024. Biden's withdrawal from the U.S. presidential race injects greater uncertainty into the world. (Stefan Rousseau/Pool Photo via AP, File)

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