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Penguin Solutions Expands OriginAI Solution to Accelerate AI Factory Deployment and Optimize Performance

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Penguin Solutions Expands OriginAI Solution to Accelerate AI Factory Deployment and Optimize Performance
News

News

Penguin Solutions Expands OriginAI Solution to Accelerate AI Factory Deployment and Optimize Performance

2024-06-18 23:02 Last Updated At:23:10

FREMONT, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Jun 18, 2024--

Penguin Solutions ™, an SGH ™ brand (Nasdaq: SGH ) that designs, builds, deploys, and manages AI and accelerated computing infrastructures at scale, today announced the expansion of its OriginAI ® solution to include validated, pre-defined AI architectures incorporating NVIDIA technology. Backed by Penguin’s intelligent cluster management software and expert services, OriginAI infrastructure streamlines AI implementation and management, and enables predictable AI cluster performance in support of customer ROI from clusters that can range in size from hundreds to thousands of GPUs.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20240618202845/en/

“Designing, deploying, and operating AI factories is an incredibly complex endeavor. Our OriginAI solution builds on Penguin’s extensive AI infrastructure expertise to reduce this complexity and accelerate return on investment,” said Penguin Solutions President Pete Manca. “Our OriginAI solution is a major step forward in providing CEOs and CIOs the essential and reliable infrastructure they need to deploy and manage demanding AI workloads at scale.”

The OriginAI solution provides assured infrastructure for critical, demanding workloads by combining proven architectures, latest generation hardware, advanced cluster management software, and expert professional services. These architectures are based on 1-pod, 4-pod, and 16-pod configurations which can scale from 256 to more than 16,000 GPUs. The OriginAI solution incorporates NVIDIA H100 GPUs, Penguin’s Scyld ClusterWare ® 12.2 software, and industry-leading networking and storage options – and is supported by Penguin’s full range of managed services.

“Better GPU performance and controlled costs are top of mind for customers today. Validated, scalable OriginAI architectures developed with Penguin Solutions’ hands-on expertise in designing, integrating, installing and provisioning AI infrastructure deliver both,” noted Matt Eastwood, SVP of enterprise infrastructure research at IDC. “Penguin continues to enable AI workloads for the most demanding environments through its innovative high-performance solutions and services.”

Based on proven architectures, the OriginAI solution utilizes Penguin's innovative in-factory burn-in and integration environment to validate AI cluster performance and confirm production readiness prior to shipment, ensuring that customers get the expected performance and return on investment from the moment of deployment. By combining these architectures with Penguin’s Scyld ClusterWare software and its expert managed services that predictively monitor cluster health and manage solution throughput, OriginAI delivers greater than 95% overall cluster efficiency while driving higher GPU throughput than traditional approaches.

Penguin Solutions is an NVIDIA-certified Elite OEM and DGX AI Compute Systems Solution Provider and DGX-Ready Managed Services partner that has been delivering AI factories at scale since 2017. With 25+ years of HPC experience – and more than 75,000 GPUs deployed and managed to date – Penguin is a trusted strategic partner for AI and HPC solutions and services for leading organizations such as Georgia Tech, Meta, Sandia Labs, and the U.S. Navy.

For more information, visit Penguin OriginAI infrastructure solutions at https://www.penguinsolutions.com/solutions/ai/originai.

Penguin Solutions, OriginAI, and Scyld ClusterWare are trademarks of Penguin Computing, Inc., a subsidiary of SMART Global Holdings, Inc. All other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

About Penguin Solutions

The Penguin Solutions ™ portfolio, which includes Penguin Computing ™ and Penguin Edge ™ branded products, accelerates customers’ digital transformation with the power of emerging technologies in HPC, AI, and IoT with solutions and services that span the continuum of edge, core, and cloud. By designing highly-advanced infrastructure, machines, and networked systems we enable the world’s most innovative enterprises and government institutions to build the autonomous future, drive discovery and amplify human potential.

Follow Penguin Solutions on LinkedIn, Twitter, YouTube, and Facebook.

Penguin Solutions is an SGH Brand.

Penguin Solutions announces the expansion of its OriginAI solution to include validated, pre-defined AI architectures backed by Penguin's intelligent cluster management software and expert services. OriginAI infrastructure streamlines AI implementation and management, enabling predictable AI cluster performance. (Graphic: Penguin Solutions)

Penguin Solutions announces the expansion of its OriginAI solution to include validated, pre-defined AI architectures backed by Penguin's intelligent cluster management software and expert services. OriginAI infrastructure streamlines AI implementation and management, enabling predictable AI cluster performance. (Graphic: Penguin Solutions)

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — This year, Ukraine’s largest music festival struck a different chord. Gone were the international headliners, the massive performance halls and the hundreds of thousands of visitors.

Instead, the country’s most beloved local artists graced the stage this past weekend at the Atlas Festival for what remained an ebullient crowd. The stage was erected in a shopping mall parking lot, the only option with a shelter large enough to contain the 25,000 people expected in the event of an air raid.

Carefree youth danced, romanced and sang along, rubbing shoulders with hardened military commanders as famous singers who crooned lyrics imbued with national pride. Music was the main goal, but so was shattering the illusion that the capital is invulnerable to the bloody battles hundreds of miles away.

“Such kind of festivals can’t be separated from the life of the country. The country is at war. The core issues here should relate to the war,” said Vsevolod Kozhemyako, a businessman and one of the founders of the 13th “Khartia” Brigade, now a part of Ukraine’s National Guard and defending the frontline in Kharkiv.

“People who are still young and who don’t join (the fight) should understand that they cannot live in a bubble,” he said.

And yet, a bubble is precisely how it feels to be in Kyiv, as the war approaches its third year. While Ukrainian soldiers are killed and wounded every day along the 1,000-kilometer (620-mile) frontline in the east, the capital is a contrast with its busy bars and clubs.

Every so often, Kyiv comes face to face with the war. Two weeks ago, a barrage of Russian missiles destroyed a children’s hospital and a private clinic, in one of the deadliest attacks since the full-scale invasion. Residents have grappled with power cuts caused by Moscow’s targeted destruction of Ukrainian energy generation at the height of a summer heat wave.

In every corner of the music festival — the first time it was held since Russia’s full-scale invasion of the country in February 2022 — visitors were confronted with the inescapable reality that theirs is a country trapped in a bloody war of attrition. Festival organizers hoped to raise $2.2 million (2 million euros) to help soldiers purchase supplies for the front line.

In the mall’s basement parking lot, various military units, from Khartia to the 3rd Assault, offered interactive games to lure donations and possible recruits. A first-person shooter game offered visitors a chance to improve target practice by gunning down shadowy virtual infantrymen. In another corner, medics brandished severed plastic limbs and offered emergency medical training.

The festival concluded Sunday with a much-anticipated performance from Serhii Zhadan and his band Zhadan and Dogs. Zhadan, a celebrated artist dubbed the poet of the Donbas, recently joined Khartia.

“It’s just a small break, an opportunity to take a breath,” said Zhadan, minutes before he took to the stage for a roaring crowd. “The most important things, they are happening over there, at the frontline.”

On stage, Zhadan started with one of his most beloved songs “Malvi” or “Mallow.” The crowd sang along, word for word. “But what can you do with my hot blood,” they chanted. “Who will come at us.”

18-year old Viktoriia Khalis was excited to see his performance. She had been to the Atlas festival once before in 2021. The difference is stark, she said.

“The main thing that has changed, unfortunately, now the festival is connected with donations,” she said. But she also felt more connected to her homeland. “I feel this entire crowd is related to me. I feel unity.”

She was scared there would be another Russian air attack — a music festival with thousands of attendees would be a prime target — but said she couldn’t miss a chance to see her favorite artists.

For Nadiia Dorofeeva, one of Ukraine’s most famous singers, every concert feels different. “Before, when I entered a stage I was thinking only about if I looked good, sang well and if the people got what they came for. But now, I dream of having no air alarms, I am seeing how people cry at my concerts.”

One of Dorofeeva’s songs, “WhatsApp,” is about a girl waiting for her beloved to return from war. “She washed the phone with tears/Like rainy glass,” often moves listeners to tears.

Among the attendees was Lt. Gen. Serhii Naiev, an assistant deputy chief in Ukraine’s General Staff.

“There are well-known artists on stage, they are performing their concerts and there are a lot of Ukrainians around who are donating their money, much-needed money for the armed forces of Ukraine,” he said.

“We understand that our partners are supporting us, but we also understand that we could do a lot by ourselves, to be stronger,” he said.

Follow AP's coverage at https://apnews.com/hub/russia-ukraine

Serhii Zhadan, well-known Ukrainian writer and poet, leader of music band Zhadan and Dogs, performs at the Atlas Festival in Kyiv, Ukraine, Sunday, July 21, 2024. This year, Ukraine's largest music festival struck a different chord. Gone were the international headliners, the massive performance halls and the hundreds of thousands of visitors. (AP Photo/Anton Shtuka)

Serhii Zhadan, well-known Ukrainian writer and poet, leader of music band Zhadan and Dogs, performs at the Atlas Festival in Kyiv, Ukraine, Sunday, July 21, 2024. This year, Ukraine's largest music festival struck a different chord. Gone were the international headliners, the massive performance halls and the hundreds of thousands of visitors. (AP Photo/Anton Shtuka)

People with painted faces go to the Atlas Festival in Kyiv, Ukraine, Sunday, July 21, 2024. This year, Ukraine's largest music festival struck a different chord. Gone were the international headliners, the massive performance halls and the hundreds of thousands of visitors. (AP Photo/Anton Shtuka)

People with painted faces go to the Atlas Festival in Kyiv, Ukraine, Sunday, July 21, 2024. This year, Ukraine's largest music festival struck a different chord. Gone were the international headliners, the massive performance halls and the hundreds of thousands of visitors. (AP Photo/Anton Shtuka)

People enjoy a concert at the Atlas Festival in Kyiv, Ukraine, Sunday, July 21, 2024. This year, Ukraine's largest music festival struck a different chord. Gone were the international headliners, the massive performance halls and the hundreds of thousands of visitors. (AP Photo/Anton Shtuka)

People enjoy a concert at the Atlas Festival in Kyiv, Ukraine, Sunday, July 21, 2024. This year, Ukraine's largest music festival struck a different chord. Gone were the international headliners, the massive performance halls and the hundreds of thousands of visitors. (AP Photo/Anton Shtuka)

People dance waiting for the start of the Atlas Festival in Kyiv, Ukraine, Sunday, July 21, 2024. This year, Ukraine's largest music festival struck a different chord. Gone were the international headliners, the massive performance halls and the hundreds of thousands of visitors. (AP Photo/Anton Shtuka)

People dance waiting for the start of the Atlas Festival in Kyiv, Ukraine, Sunday, July 21, 2024. This year, Ukraine's largest music festival struck a different chord. Gone were the international headliners, the massive performance halls and the hundreds of thousands of visitors. (AP Photo/Anton Shtuka)

Serhii Zhadan, well-known Ukrainian writer and poet, leader of music band Zhadan and Dogs, performs at the Atlas Festival in Kyiv, Ukraine, Sunday, July 21, 2024. This year, Ukraine's largest music festival struck a different chord. Gone were the international headliners, the massive performance halls and the hundreds of thousands of visitors. (AP Photo/Anton Shtuka)

Serhii Zhadan, well-known Ukrainian writer and poet, leader of music band Zhadan and Dogs, performs at the Atlas Festival in Kyiv, Ukraine, Sunday, July 21, 2024. This year, Ukraine's largest music festival struck a different chord. Gone were the international headliners, the massive performance halls and the hundreds of thousands of visitors. (AP Photo/Anton Shtuka)

People enjoy a concert at the Atlas Festival in Kyiv, Ukraine, Sunday, July 21, 2024. This year, Ukraine's largest music festival struck a different chord. Gone were the international headliners, the massive performance halls and the hundreds of thousands of visitors. (AP Photo/Anton Shtuka)

People enjoy a concert at the Atlas Festival in Kyiv, Ukraine, Sunday, July 21, 2024. This year, Ukraine's largest music festival struck a different chord. Gone were the international headliners, the massive performance halls and the hundreds of thousands of visitors. (AP Photo/Anton Shtuka)

People enjoy a concert at the Atlas Festival in Kyiv, Ukraine, Sunday, July 21, 2024. This year, Ukraine's largest music festival struck a different chord. Gone were the international headliners, the massive performance halls and the hundreds of thousands of visitors. (AP Photo/Anton Shtuka)

People enjoy a concert at the Atlas Festival in Kyiv, Ukraine, Sunday, July 21, 2024. This year, Ukraine's largest music festival struck a different chord. Gone were the international headliners, the massive performance halls and the hundreds of thousands of visitors. (AP Photo/Anton Shtuka)

People enjoy a concert at the Atlas Festival in Kyiv, Ukraine, Sunday, July 21, 2024. This year, Ukraine's largest music festival struck a different chord. Gone were the international headliners, the massive performance halls and the hundreds of thousands of visitors. (AP Photo/Anton Shtuka)

People enjoy a concert at the Atlas Festival in Kyiv, Ukraine, Sunday, July 21, 2024. This year, Ukraine's largest music festival struck a different chord. Gone were the international headliners, the massive performance halls and the hundreds of thousands of visitors. (AP Photo/Anton Shtuka)

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