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Aaron Judge out of Yankees' lineup against Orioles, one night after getting hit on hand by pitch

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Aaron Judge out of Yankees' lineup against Orioles, one night after getting hit on hand by pitch
News

News

Aaron Judge out of Yankees' lineup against Orioles, one night after getting hit on hand by pitch

2024-06-20 13:18 Last Updated At:13:20

NEW YORK (AP) — Aaron Judge was out of the New York Yankees' lineup Wednesday against the Baltimore Orioles, one night after he was hit on the left hand by a pitch.

Yankees manager Aaron Boone said Judge was feeling better, though, and even took a few swings in the indoor batting cage.

“I think it's day to day,” Boone said before the game. “It was probably close today."

“But definitely is still pretty sore in there, so I don’t want him to go out there and kind of compromise anything just to fight through it, just start a bad habit or something," he added. "So hopefully continue to get improvements today and we’ll see about tomorrow.”

Trent Grisham replaced Judge in center field and batted ninth as New York lost 7-6 in 10 innings. Yankees ace Gerrit Cole pitched four-plus innings in his season debut after recovering from a right elbow injury.

Judge was struck by a 94.1 mph fastball from Baltimore starter Albert Suárez during New York's 4-2 win Tuesday night. The slugger left the game an inning later, but X-rays and a CT scan were negative, so it appears he avoided serious injury.

“I think we both kind of came in a little bit open to (playing Wednesday). And then ultimately I just kind of said, 'I think we should take the day. It doesn’t hurt, grand scheme of things,'" Boone said. “Hopefully serves him well total body as well.”

Judge is batting .302 and leads the major leagues with 26 homers and 64 RBIs. The 32-year-old outfielder is a five-time All-Star and was the 2022 AL MVP after hitting 62 home runs to break the AL record of 61 by Roger Maris set in 1961.

Judge missed 45 games with a broken right wrist after he was hit by a 93.4 mph pitch from Kansas City’s Jakob Junis on July 26, 2018.

“Feeling better after I got some good news,” Judge said Tuesday night after returning to Yankee Stadium from New York–Presbyterian Hospital. “A big relief. Just being hit there before a couple of years ago and breaking the wrist, you never know what’s going to happen. So finding out that it’s not fractured, not broken, is definitely a sigh of relief.”

Another big star, the Los Angeles Dodgers' Mookie Betts, broke his left hand Sunday when hit by a pitch from Dan Altavilla of the Kansas City Royals and is expected to miss six to eight weeks.

“Anytime you get hit by 94, 95 up and in like that and especially in the hands where there’s so many small bones,” Judge said, “you just never know what’s going to happen and what it’s going to be.”

AP Baseball Writer Ronald Blum contributed to this report.

AP MLB: https://apnews.com/hub/mlb

Aaron Judge out of Yankees' lineup against Orioles, one night after getting hit on hand by pitch

Aaron Judge out of Yankees' lineup against Orioles, one night after getting hit on hand by pitch

Aaron Judge out of Yankees' lineup against Orioles, one night after getting hit on hand by pitch

Aaron Judge out of Yankees' lineup against Orioles, one night after getting hit on hand by pitch

New York Yankees' Aaron Judge reacts to getting hit by a pitch from Baltimore Orioles' Albert Suárez during the third inning of a baseball game Tuesday, June 18, 2024, in New York. (AP Photo/Pamela Smith)

New York Yankees' Aaron Judge reacts to getting hit by a pitch from Baltimore Orioles' Albert Suárez during the third inning of a baseball game Tuesday, June 18, 2024, in New York. (AP Photo/Pamela Smith)

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What to know about Evan Gershkovich's conviction for espionage in Russia

2024-07-19 22:38 Last Updated At:22:40

The trial of Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich ended Friday with his conviction on espionage charges that he, his employer and the U.S. government have dismissed as fabricated. He was sentenced to 16 years in prison.

Here’s what we know about the secretive process.

It took place in the Sverdlovsk Regional Court in the city of Yekaterinburg, about 880 miles (1,416 kilometers) east of Moscow. That's the city where Gershkovich was arrested in March 2023, while on a reporting trip.

The session was closed. Gershkovich was in court for the verdict and stood in the glass defendants' cage wearing a dark colored T-shirt. His head was shaved, just as it was at the start of his trial in June. It is not known whether he chose to shave it or whether he was forced to.

The judge sentenced Gershkovich to 16 years in a maximum security penal colony. The judge asked Gershkovich if he understood the verdict and he replied in Russian, “yes, your honor.” The judge asked if he had any questions and Gershkovich replied “no, your honor.”

As the press cameras were leaving court, someone shouted out “we love you Evan."

Gershkovich, the American-born son of immigrants from the USSR, is the first Western journalist arrested on espionage charges in post-Soviet Russia. Russian authorities, without presenting evidence, claimed he was gathering secret information for the U.S.

The State Department has declared him “wrongfully detained,” thereby committing the government to assertively seek his release.

The Journal's publisher, Almar Latour, and Emma Tucker, its top editor, called it a “disgraceful, sham conviction,” in a statement after the verdict. “Journalism is not a crime, and we will not rest until he’s released. This must end now,” Latour and Tucker said.

A top White House spokesman also called the proceedings “nothing more than a sham trial.”

“Evan has never been employed by the United States government. Evan is not a spy. Journalism is not a crime. And Evan should never have been detained in the first place,” White House national security spokesman John Kirby said Wednesday. “Russia has failed to justify Evan’s continued detention. He, like fellow American Paul Whelan, is simply being used as a bargaining chip.”

Gershkovich’s arrest came about a year after President Vladimir Putin pushed through laws that chilled journalists, criminalizing criticism of Russia’s war in Ukraine and statements seen as discrediting the military. Foreign journalists largely left the country after the laws’ passage, but some have trickled back in. There are concerns about whether Russian authorities would target them as animosity between Moscow and Washington grows.

After the verdict, Gershkovich is expected to be taken back to the detention facility in Yekaterinburg where he was held during the trial. Both the prosecution and defense have 15 days to appeal the sentence. If there’s no appeal, Gershkovich will be transferred back to prison.

If there is an appeal, Gershkovich will probably stay in Yekaterinburg until there is another hearing.

The process of transferring him can last days or even months, and it may only be clear where Gershkovich will serve his sentence once his lawyers are told that he has arrived at a prison.

Although Russia-U.S. relations are at their lowest point since the Cold War, the countries negotiated a swap in 2022 that freed WNBA star Brittney Griner, who had been serving a 9 1/2-year sentence for cannabis possession. Griner was exchanged for arms dealer Viktor Bout, who was imprisoned in the U.S.

The countries also traded Marine veteran Trevor Reed, who serving nine years in Russia for assaulting a police officer, and Russian pilot Konstantin Yaroshenko, who’d been serving a 20-year prison sentence for conspiring to smuggle cocaine.

Putin hinted that he would be open to swapping Gershkovich for Vadim Krasikov, a Russian serving a life sentence in Germany for the 2019 killing in Berlin of a Georgian citizen of Chechen descent. However, Germany’s willingness to cooperate is uncertain.

It could be months or years. Russian officials previously said a swap can only happen after a verdict, but it depends on when Moscow and Washington can reach a deal. Past experiences differ drastically.

Griner was exchanged about four months after her verdict. Reed was released in a swap 21 months after his. Whelan, convicted of espionage in 2020 and sentenced to 16 years in prison, is still waiting.

Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich stands listening to the verdict in a glass cage of a courtroom inside the building of "Palace of justice," in Yekaterinburg, Russia, on Friday, July 19, 2024. A Russian court convicted Gershkovich on espionage charges that his employer and the U.S. have rejected as fabricated. He was sentenced to 16 years in prison after a secretive and rapid trial in the country's highly politicized legal system. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich stands listening to the verdict in a glass cage of a courtroom inside the building of "Palace of justice," in Yekaterinburg, Russia, on Friday, July 19, 2024. A Russian court convicted Gershkovich on espionage charges that his employer and the U.S. have rejected as fabricated. He was sentenced to 16 years in prison after a secretive and rapid trial in the country's highly politicized legal system. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich, second left, stands listening to the verdict in a glass cage of a courtroom inside the building of "Palace of justice," in Yekaterinburg, Russia, on Friday, July 19, 2024. A Russian court convicted Gershkovich on espionage charges that his employer and the U.S. have rejected as fabricated. He was sentenced to 16 years in prison after a secretive and rapid trial in the country's highly politicized legal system. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich, second left, stands listening to the verdict in a glass cage of a courtroom inside the building of "Palace of justice," in Yekaterinburg, Russia, on Friday, July 19, 2024. A Russian court convicted Gershkovich on espionage charges that his employer and the U.S. have rejected as fabricated. He was sentenced to 16 years in prison after a secretive and rapid trial in the country's highly politicized legal system. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

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