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Freddy Peralta outduels Tyler Anderson in the Brewers' 2-0 win over the Angels

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Freddy Peralta outduels Tyler Anderson in the Brewers' 2-0 win over the Angels
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Freddy Peralta outduels Tyler Anderson in the Brewers' 2-0 win over the Angels

2024-06-20 12:44 Last Updated At:12:51

ANAHEIM, Calif. (AP) — Freddy Peralta struck out eight over six innings of three-hit ball, outdueling Tyler Anderson in the Milwaukee Brewers' 2-0 victory over the Los Angeles Angels on Wednesday night.

Rhys Hoskins and Willy Adames drove in runs for the Brewers, who took two of three in Anaheim to open their Southern California road trip.

Peralta (5-4) rebounded from a pair of rough outings against Cincinnati and Detroit with a strong effort against the punchless Angels. Although he walked two and wasn’t particularly efficient, Peralta repeatedly escaped trouble.

“Everything was a little clearer for me today because I had the right mindset,” Peralta said. “I worked on that the last four or five days. ... Sometimes I ask for too much of myself, and I put myself in a hard situation. My family tries to help me sometimes, because they know how I am. I just try to relax a little bit.”

Los Angeles got two runners into scoring position in the sixth, but Peralta retired Logan O’Hoppe on a hot grounder up the middle with his final pitch.

“I thought Freddy was terrific,” Brewers manager Pat Murphy said. “His focus was consistent. ... He expects this. He expects six shutout (innings) every time, and it's hard. He's been around a while. Guys know him, and guys are gunning for him and getting up for him. I'm really proud of Freddy battling the way he did tonight.”

Bryan Hudson pitched two innings of relief before Huntington Beach native Trevor Megill finished Milwaukee's four-hitter and its fourth shutout win of the season with his 15th save.

Anderson (6-7) held his opponents to one run for the sixth time in his last seven starts, but lost for the third time in that stretch. The veteran lefty allowed four hits and three walks over seven sharp innings, striking out five.

“That's what it was, a pitchers' duel,” Angels manager Ron Washington said. “(Anderson) really settled down and spotted his fastball. He kept them off the barrel. He was working fast. He was very efficient. I just feel that he didn’t get a chance to win that ballgame.”

The Angels managed only four singles while getting shut out for the third time this season. Los Angeles' offense struggled mightily after the first four innings of this series Monday, scoring runs only once — a three-run rally in the ninth inning Tuesday — in its final 22 innings against the Brewers' pitching staff.

“Peralta is not just some run-of-the-mill-type pitcher,” Washington said. “He's got weapons. It was a great pitching duel. We just came out on the wrong end. We had opportunities.”

Three of Milwaukee's first four batters reached base before Hoskins' flyout in the first inning. Kevin Pillar made a sprinting, sliding catch on Sal Frelick's fly down the right-field line to limit the damage.

Christian Yelich walked, stole second and scored on Adames' soft single off Luis García in the eighth.

TRAINER'S ROOM

Angels: INF Brandon Drury was scratched from the starting lineup two hours before game time due to an illness. The veteran had played two games since returning Monday from a 34-game absence with a hamstring injury.

UP NEXT

Brewers: Bryse Wilson (4-3, 3.84 ERA) takes the mound Thursday in San Diego to begin a four-game series with the Padres.

Angels: Patrick Sandoval (2-8, 5.24 ERA) will take the mound up the road at Dodger Stadium on Friday to begin a two-game Freeway Series with the Los Angeles Dodgers.

AP MLB: https://apnews.com/MLB

Milwaukee Brewers' Christian Yelich, left, reaches second past Los Angeles Angels shortstop Zach Neto after hitting a double during the third inning of a baseball game, Wednesday, June 19, 2024, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Ryan Sun)

Milwaukee Brewers' Christian Yelich, left, reaches second past Los Angeles Angels shortstop Zach Neto after hitting a double during the third inning of a baseball game, Wednesday, June 19, 2024, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Ryan Sun)

Los Angeles Angels starting pitcher Tyler Anderson throws to a Milwaukee Brewers batter during the second inning of a baseball game Wednesday, June 19, 2024, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Ryan Sun)

Los Angeles Angels starting pitcher Tyler Anderson throws to a Milwaukee Brewers batter during the second inning of a baseball game Wednesday, June 19, 2024, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Ryan Sun)

Los Angeles Angels' Taylor Ward runs after hitting a single against the Milwaukee Brewers during the fourth inning of a baseball game Wednesday, June 19, 2024, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Ryan Sun)

Los Angeles Angels' Taylor Ward runs after hitting a single against the Milwaukee Brewers during the fourth inning of a baseball game Wednesday, June 19, 2024, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Ryan Sun)

Milwaukee Brewers starting pitcher Freddy Peralta reacts after Los Angeles Angels' Logan O'Hoppe grounded out to end the sixth inning of a baseball game Wednesday, June 19, 2024, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Ryan Sun)

Milwaukee Brewers starting pitcher Freddy Peralta reacts after Los Angeles Angels' Logan O'Hoppe grounded out to end the sixth inning of a baseball game Wednesday, June 19, 2024, in Anaheim, Calif. (AP Photo/Ryan Sun)

WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — Spade-toothed whales are the world’s rarest, with no live sightings ever recorded. No one knows how many there are, what they eat, or even where they live in the vast expanse of the southern Pacific Ocean. However, scientists in New Zealand may have finally caught a break.

The country's conservation agency said Monday a creature that washed up on a South Island beach this month is believed to be a spade-toothed whale. The five-meter-long creature, a type of beaked whale, was identified after it washed ashore on an Otago beach from its color patterns and the shape of its skull, beak and teeth.

“We know very little, practically nothing” about the creatures, Hannah Hendriks, marine technical adviser for the Department of Conservation, told the Associated Press. “This is going to lead to some amazing science and world-first information.”

If the cetacean is confirmed to be the elusive spade-toothed whale, it would be the first specimen found in a state that would permit scientists to dissect it, allowing them to map the relationship of the whale to the few others of the species found, learn what it eats and perhaps lead to clues about where they live.

Only six other spade-toothed whales have ever been pinpointed, and those found intact on New Zealand’s North Island beaches were buried before DNA testing could verify their identification, Hendriks said, thwarting any chance to study them.

This time, the beached whale was quickly transported to cold storage and researchers will work with local Māori iwi (tribes) to plan how it will be examined, the conservation agency said.

New Zealand’s Indigenous people consider whales a taonga — a sacred treasure — of cultural significance. In April, Pacific Indigenous leaders signed a treaty recognizing whales as “legal persons,” although such a declaration is not reflected in the laws of participating nations.

Nothing is currently known about the whales’ habitat. The creatures deep-dive for food and likely surface so rarely that it has been impossible to narrow their location further than the southern Pacific Ocean, home to some of the world’s deepest ocean trenches, Hendriks said.

“It’s very hard to do research on marine mammals if you don’t see them at sea,” she said. “It’s a bit of a needle in a haystack. You don’t know where to look.”

The conservation agency said the genetic testing to confirm the whale's identification could take months.

It took “many years and a mammoth amount of effort by researchers and local people” to identify the “incredibly cryptic” mammals, Kirsten Young, a senior lecturer at the University of Exeter who has studied spade-toothed whales, said in emailed remarks.

The fresh discovery “makes me wonder — how many are out in the deep ocean and how do they live?” Young said.

The first spade-toothed whale bones were found in 1872 on New Zealand’s Pitt Island. Another discovery was made at an offshore island in the 1950s, and the bones of a third were found on Chile’s Robinson Crusoe Island in 1986. DNA sequencing in 2002 proved that all three specimens were of the same species — and that it was one distinct from other beaked whales.

Researchers studying the mammal couldn’t confirm if the species went extinct. Then in 2010, two whole spade-toothed whales, both dead, washed up on a New Zealand beach. Firstly mistaken for one of New Zealand’s 13 other more common types of beaked whale, tissue samples — taken after they were buried — revealed them as the enigmatic species.

New Zealand is a whale-stranding hotspot, with more than 5,000 episodes recorded since 1840, according to the Department of Conservation.

In this photo provided by the Department of Conservation, rangers inspect what is believed to be a rare spade-toothed whale on July 5, 2024, after it was found washed ashore on a beach near Otago, New Zealand. (Department of Conservation via AP)

In this photo provided by the Department of Conservation, rangers inspect what is believed to be a rare spade-toothed whale on July 5, 2024, after it was found washed ashore on a beach near Otago, New Zealand. (Department of Conservation via AP)

In this photo provided by the Department of Conservation rangers Jim Fyfe and Tūmai Cassidy walk alongside what is believed to be a rare spade-toothed whale, on July 5, 2024, after its was found washed ashore on a beach near Otago, New Zealand. (Department of Conservation via AP)

In this photo provided by the Department of Conservation rangers Jim Fyfe and Tūmai Cassidy walk alongside what is believed to be a rare spade-toothed whale, on July 5, 2024, after its was found washed ashore on a beach near Otago, New Zealand. (Department of Conservation via AP)

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