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Yemen's children struggle for education amid decade-long conflict

China

China

China

Yemen's children struggle for education amid decade-long conflict

2024-06-20 21:57 Last Updated At:22:57

June 20 marks World Refugee Day, shedding light on Yemen's children who have endured nearly a decade-long conflict that has uprooted millions, depriving them of homes and educational opportunities.

In the southwestern province of Taiz, 11-year-old Muhammad Abdo fled to the south with his family four years ago from escalating conflict in the west, where they have faced hunger and hardship, prioritizing survival over schooling.

"My father suffers from mental illness. I had to work to support my younger brothers. My older brother passed away, leaving behind his children. In this situation, I don't have time to go to school," Abdo told China Central Television (CCTV).

For four years, Abdo had to forsake schooling to work on nearby farms. But hope for education flickered back to life in Abdo's displacement camp, with a makeshift school funded by donations.

"I miss school and the feeling of reading. I had forgotten what that felt like. Now teachers are teaching us again, and I have rediscovered the joy of reading and writing," said Abdo.

According to UNICEF, Yemen has 12 million school-age children, with 4.5 million being out of school, posing a monumental challenge for the country's educational system. Rebuilding schools, rehiring teachers, and ensuring they receive salaries remain critical amid ongoing conflict.

"We are very happy to see them back in school. However, we need more aid. We need to be provided with campuses, books, uniforms, and food to ensure they can continue their educational journey," said Tawfiq Hassan, who is teaching at the makeshift school.

Due to displacement, Abdo missed four years of schooling and is now in fourth grade, significantly older than his classmates.

"My dream is to become a teacher and teach students in school," said Abdo.

Education remains pivotal in reshaping Yemen's future, crucial for the well-being of displaced children and refugees. Addressing political disputes and achieving a ceasefire are essential for improving conditions and upholding their educational rights, fostering stability for Yemen's recovery.

Yemen's children struggle for education amid decade-long conflict

Yemen's children struggle for education amid decade-long conflict

Yemen's children struggle for education amid decade-long conflict

Yemen's children struggle for education amid decade-long conflict

Reforms mapped out in a resolution of the third plenary session of the 20th Central Committee of the Communist Party of China (CPC) lay out a path for China to become a developed country by building on recent policies that have opened the economy to foreign capital, according to Grow Investment's chief economist Hong Hao.

The 20th CPC Central Committee adopted the resolution on further deepening reform comprehensively to advance Chinese modernization at its third plenary session held in Beijing from Monday to Thursday, drawing up a sweeping blueprint that will guide China's reform and opening-up for years to come.

Offering the first glimpse of what nearly 400 officials discussed behind closed doors during the four-day meeting, it outlined the country's aim to build into a "high-level socialist market economy" by 2035.

In his analysis of the readout, Hong underscored the country's transition to an economy centered on innovation.

"I think right now China is going through the process of restructuring its growth engine. So in the past twenty years, it has been exports and also it has been the domestic property market that have been driving Chinese growth. I think going forward, there's a new term that is being mentioned many times in the recent communique (resolution), which is the new [quality] productive forces. So we are hoping in the next stage of growth, we're trying to use technological advancement and other forms of new technology to help China go into a medium-level developed country," said the chief economist.

Financial reform is one of the main focuses of the document, which calls for tax cuts and deepening institutional reform in finance and fiscal policy.

In Hong's view, these reforms will likely be key to enticing more foreign capital into the country's financial sector.

"Since a couple of years ago, we've been allowing foreign capital to increase its stake in many of the financial industries in China, for example, insurance, mutual fund companies. So right now the foreign capital can own a majority at stake in many of these companies. I think going forward, there's also a reform of how the mutual fund industry is being regulated, how financial professionals have been compensated in the financial industry and also how best to use the financial instruments as the instrument to propel Chinese growth," said Hong.

More reforms to unlock "hidden productive forces" of China’s economy: investment economist

More reforms to unlock "hidden productive forces" of China’s economy: investment economist

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