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Navigating through darkness: Ukraine’s emergency blackouts return after Russia pounds infrastructure

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Navigating through darkness: Ukraine’s emergency blackouts return after Russia pounds infrastructure
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Navigating through darkness: Ukraine’s emergency blackouts return after Russia pounds infrastructure

2024-06-21 13:19 Last Updated At:13:31

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — During daytime, entire districts of Ukraine's capital are disconnected from the power grid to save energy. Traffic lights stop, choking traffic, accompanied by the constant rumble of generators installed outside cafes and shops.

Ukraine, including Kyiv, is struggling to cope with a new wave of rolling blackouts after relentless Russian attacks took out half the country’s power generation capacity.

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A general view of the central district of the city is seen during a blackout in Kyiv, Ukraine, Friday, June 7, 2024 (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

KYIV, Ukraine (AP) — During daytime, entire districts of Ukraine's capital are disconnected from the power grid to save energy. Traffic lights stop, choking traffic, accompanied by the constant rumble of generators installed outside cafes and shops.

A man is working on his laptop at a coffee shop, which operates during blackouts in Kyiv, Ukraine, Friday, June 7, 2024. Ukraine is experiencing rolling blackouts as Russia intensified strikes targeting energy infrastructure over the past three months. (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

A man is working on his laptop at a coffee shop, which operates during blackouts in Kyiv, Ukraine, Friday, June 7, 2024. Ukraine is experiencing rolling blackouts as Russia intensified strikes targeting energy infrastructure over the past three months. (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

Oleksandr Solovei, 25, the owner of the coffee shop Informatyka, poses for the portrait during a blackout in Kyiv, Ukraine, Friday, June 7, 2024. Solovei plans to buy a generator, which typically costs around $1,000, to keep his business open during blackouts. (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

Oleksandr Solovei, 25, the owner of the coffee shop Informatyka, poses for the portrait during a blackout in Kyiv, Ukraine, Friday, June 7, 2024. Solovei plans to buy a generator, which typically costs around $1,000, to keep his business open during blackouts. (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

Friends sit in a coffee shop during a blackout in Kyiv, Ukraine, Friday, June 7, 2024. (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

Friends sit in a coffee shop during a blackout in Kyiv, Ukraine, Friday, June 7, 2024. (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

A barman speaks with clients at a coffee shop during power cuts in Kyiv, Ukraine, Friday, June 7, 2024. Ukraine, including Kyiv, is struggling to cope with a new wave of rolling blackouts after relentless Russian attacks took out half the country’s power generation capacity. (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

A barman speaks with clients at a coffee shop during power cuts in Kyiv, Ukraine, Friday, June 7, 2024. Ukraine, including Kyiv, is struggling to cope with a new wave of rolling blackouts after relentless Russian attacks took out half the country’s power generation capacity. (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

Kateryna Barannyk, 30, a sales consultant of the outdoor equipment store "Gorgany" poses for the portrait during a blackout in Kyiv, Ukraine, Friday, June 7, 2024. (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

Kateryna Barannyk, 30, a sales consultant of the outdoor equipment store "Gorgany" poses for the portrait during a blackout in Kyiv, Ukraine, Friday, June 7, 2024. (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

A man looks for a backpack in an outdoor equipment store during blackouts in Kyiv, Ukraine, Friday, June 7, 2024. (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

A man looks for a backpack in an outdoor equipment store during blackouts in Kyiv, Ukraine, Friday, June 7, 2024. (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

People walk along a road during a blackout in central Kyiv, Ukraine, Thursday, June 6, 2024. (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

People walk along a road during a blackout in central Kyiv, Ukraine, Thursday, June 6, 2024. (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

A barman is seen working through the window of a coffee shop during power cuts in Kyiv, Ukraine, Friday, June 7, 2024. Ukraine, including Kyiv, is struggling to cope with a new wave of rolling blackouts after relentless Russian attacks took out half the country’s power generation capacity. (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

A barman is seen working through the window of a coffee shop during power cuts in Kyiv, Ukraine, Friday, June 7, 2024. Ukraine, including Kyiv, is struggling to cope with a new wave of rolling blackouts after relentless Russian attacks took out half the country’s power generation capacity. (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

Residents and businesses of Kyiv are adapting to the absence of electricity using generators, power banks, and flashlights and even recalculating their bathroom visits. Heavy damage inflicted to the country’s power system has left millions feeling uncertain about Ukraine’s ability to meet the national electricity demand after the warm weather months are over and the weather turns cold.

“I light my apartment as our grandparents used to — with candles and small flashlights,” said Rudoy, a 40-year-old insurance agent from Israel who relocated from Tel Aviv to Kyiv in 2023 after Russia launched its full-scale invasion of Ukraine on Feb. 24, 2022.

He said that he wanted a new life despite the war — to live side-by-side with old friends and reside in a milder climate — but he hadn't foreseen the inconveniences of living without power. Rudoy bought an apartment on the seventh floor of a newly built 25-story high rise with no gas system or water supply that's wholly dependent on electricity.

“I have to adjust my life to the blackout schedules, otherwise it is impossible to live normally — not even to use a toilet at times,” Rudoy told The Associated Press.

A friend in a nearby district typically has power when he doesn’t, which makes his life easier. Work often gets done at a cafe that has a generator, but there’s a catch.

“Even if you find a free table at a cafe nearby, working generators are very noisy and spread diesel fumes," he said. "That’s why not many cafes that operate during blackouts are actually good to work in.”

Ukraine is struggling to meet electricity demand as systematic attacks on its power infrastructure have intensified since March, forcing utilities to ration household supplies over the last three months. The country’s top officials repeatedly called on allied countries to provide more air defense systems to protect its power plants from Russian missiles and drones, but tangible damage had already been inflicted.

The blackouts in Kyiv are the worse since the early months of the war when Russian strikes on the country’s power grid led to major winter-time blackouts that led to authorities setting up communal heating areas and hundreds of emergency points where residents could drink tea, recharge their phones and get help.

“As of today, due to missile and drone attacks, we have lost 9.2 gigawatt of electricity (generating capabilities),” Ukrainian Prime Minister Denys Shmyhal said in early June. Despite having the capacity to import 2.2 gigawatts of electricity from European countries, Ukraine is importing 1.7 gigawatts, Shmyhal said.

Apart from direct imports, Ukraine is working to attract foreign investment to its private energy sector. At a summit in Berlin this month, Ukraine presented investment projects that could enable additional capacity of 1 gigawatt, said Volodymyr Kudrytskyi, the head of power utility Ukrenergo.

But in the short-term, Ukraine’s readiness before next winter looks highly uncertain considering the damages to its energy system, the feasible outlook for reconstruction, and electricity demand.

Constant blackouts bring disruption to many city residents’ daily rituals. Official power outage schedules published regularly by Ukrainian energy operators make it easier to plan the day. But energy companies often resort to unscheduled emergency blackouts when the city overconsumes electricity at the peak hours.

The circumstances force businesses and households to rely on alternative sources of electricity and light to get through a day as the summer heat makes more and more people use air conditioners. And many are worried the situation could get even worse.

Small businesses don’t always keep up, with the energy situation rapidly changing every week.

Oleksandr Solovei, the 25-year-old owner of Informatyka coffee shop in Kyiv, just plans to buy a generator, which typically costs around $1,000, to keep his business open during blackouts.

In the meantime, he must improvise. “We prepare hot water in advance, to cook matcha and teas. Cooking coffee at times like this is impossible. The coffee machine consumes too much energy,” Solovei told the AP.

A fiber-optic internet cable and a power bank that keeps the router on attract patrons to Informatyka, where they can work on their laptops. Still, customers have thinned out since the blackouts began.

“We think the situation will get worse (by winter),” Solovei said. “We already plan to buy a generator, powerful enough to brew coffee, light the space, and charge the devices of our visitors. We are preparing for a hard winter.”

Follow the AP’s coverage of the war at https://apnews.com/hub/russia-ukraine

A general view of the central district of the city is seen during a blackout in Kyiv, Ukraine, Friday, June 7, 2024 (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

A general view of the central district of the city is seen during a blackout in Kyiv, Ukraine, Friday, June 7, 2024 (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

A man is working on his laptop at a coffee shop, which operates during blackouts in Kyiv, Ukraine, Friday, June 7, 2024. Ukraine is experiencing rolling blackouts as Russia intensified strikes targeting energy infrastructure over the past three months. (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

A man is working on his laptop at a coffee shop, which operates during blackouts in Kyiv, Ukraine, Friday, June 7, 2024. Ukraine is experiencing rolling blackouts as Russia intensified strikes targeting energy infrastructure over the past three months. (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

Oleksandr Solovei, 25, the owner of the coffee shop Informatyka, poses for the portrait during a blackout in Kyiv, Ukraine, Friday, June 7, 2024. Solovei plans to buy a generator, which typically costs around $1,000, to keep his business open during blackouts. (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

Oleksandr Solovei, 25, the owner of the coffee shop Informatyka, poses for the portrait during a blackout in Kyiv, Ukraine, Friday, June 7, 2024. Solovei plans to buy a generator, which typically costs around $1,000, to keep his business open during blackouts. (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

Friends sit in a coffee shop during a blackout in Kyiv, Ukraine, Friday, June 7, 2024. (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

Friends sit in a coffee shop during a blackout in Kyiv, Ukraine, Friday, June 7, 2024. (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

A barman speaks with clients at a coffee shop during power cuts in Kyiv, Ukraine, Friday, June 7, 2024. Ukraine, including Kyiv, is struggling to cope with a new wave of rolling blackouts after relentless Russian attacks took out half the country’s power generation capacity. (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

A barman speaks with clients at a coffee shop during power cuts in Kyiv, Ukraine, Friday, June 7, 2024. Ukraine, including Kyiv, is struggling to cope with a new wave of rolling blackouts after relentless Russian attacks took out half the country’s power generation capacity. (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

Kateryna Barannyk, 30, a sales consultant of the outdoor equipment store "Gorgany" poses for the portrait during a blackout in Kyiv, Ukraine, Friday, June 7, 2024. (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

Kateryna Barannyk, 30, a sales consultant of the outdoor equipment store "Gorgany" poses for the portrait during a blackout in Kyiv, Ukraine, Friday, June 7, 2024. (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

A man looks for a backpack in an outdoor equipment store during blackouts in Kyiv, Ukraine, Friday, June 7, 2024. (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

A man looks for a backpack in an outdoor equipment store during blackouts in Kyiv, Ukraine, Friday, June 7, 2024. (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

People walk along a road during a blackout in central Kyiv, Ukraine, Thursday, June 6, 2024. (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

People walk along a road during a blackout in central Kyiv, Ukraine, Thursday, June 6, 2024. (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

A barman is seen working through the window of a coffee shop during power cuts in Kyiv, Ukraine, Friday, June 7, 2024. Ukraine, including Kyiv, is struggling to cope with a new wave of rolling blackouts after relentless Russian attacks took out half the country’s power generation capacity. (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

A barman is seen working through the window of a coffee shop during power cuts in Kyiv, Ukraine, Friday, June 7, 2024. Ukraine, including Kyiv, is struggling to cope with a new wave of rolling blackouts after relentless Russian attacks took out half the country’s power generation capacity. (AP Photo/Alex Babenko)

The Republican National Convention culminates Thursday with former President Donald Trump expected to accept the party’s presidential nomination, achieving a comeback four years in the making and anticipated even more in the past week in light of Saturday’s assassination attempt.

He is expected to accept his third consecutive party nod in prime time before thousands of supporters at Fiserv Forum in Milwaukee. Trump's running mate JD Vance addressed the same crowd on Wednesday.

Trump’s election opponent, President Joe Biden, tested positive for COVID-19 while traveling Wednesday in Las Vegas and is experiencing “mild symptoms” including “general malaise” from the infection, the White House said.

Follow the AP’s Election-2024 coverage at: https://apnews.com/hub/election-2024

Here's the Latest:

The Republican National Convention culminates Thursday with former President Donald Trump expected to accept the party’s presidential nomination, achieving a comeback four years in the making and anticipated even more in the past week in light of Saturday’s assassination attempt.

Trump is expected to accept his third consecutive party nod in prime time before thousands of supporters at Fiserv Forum in Milwaukee.

How he approaches the speech in light of his injury at a rally in Butler, Pennsylvania, will be closely watched.

▶ Here’s what to know about Trump’s speech and the final day of the convention

Hundreds of people who gathered to remember the former fire chief fatally shot at a weekend rally for former President Donald Trump were urged to find “unity” as the area in rural Pennsylvania sought to recover from the assassination attempt.

Wednesday’s public event was the first of two organized to memorialize and celebrate Corey Comperatore’s life. The second, a visitation for friends, was planned for Thursday at Laube Hall in Freeport.

Outside Lernerville Speedway in Sarver, where the vigil was held for Comperatore, a sign read: “Rest in Peace Corey, Thank You For Your Service,” with the logo of his fire company.

On the rural road to the auto racing track — lined with cornfields, churches and industrial plants — a sign outside a local credit union read: “Our thoughts and prayers are with the Comperatore family.”

▶ Read more about the vigil for Corey Comperatore

A former president is shot, the gunman quickly neutralized, and all of it is caught on camera. But for those who don’t believe their eyes, that’s just the start of the story.

For some supporters of former President Donald Trump, the failure of the Secret Service to prevent the attempted assassination points to a conspiracy orchestrated by President Joe Biden. For some of Trump’s critics, however, the details of the shooting don’t add up. They wonder if Trump somehow staged the whole thing.

Two dueling conspiracy theories are taking root online following Trump’s attempted assassination, one for each end of America’s polarized political spectrum. In this split-screen republic, Americans are increasingly choosing their own reality, at the expense of a shared understanding of the facts.

“One screen, two movies,” is how Ron Bassilian describes the online reaction to Saturday’s shooting. Bassilian is a prolific user of social media and has used X to broadcast his conjecture about the shooting. “People have their beliefs, and they’re going to come up with theories that fit their beliefs.”

▶ Read more about the conspiracy theories surrounding the Trump shooting

Relatives of some of the 13 American service members killed during the chaotic withdrawal from Afghanistan appeared on stage at the Republican National Convention Wednesday in an emotional moment that revived one of the low points of President Joe Biden’s presidency.

Many of the Gold Star families have criticized Biden for never publicly naming their loved ones. On stage Wednesday, one of the family members named each of the 13 service members, and the crowd echoed back each name as it was read aloud.

“Joe Biden has refused to recognize their sacrifice,” Christy Shamblin, the mother-in-law of Marine Sgt. Nicole Gee, told the crowd. “Donald Trump knew all of our children’s names. He knew all of their stories.”

The crowd chanted “Never forget!” and “U.S.A.!” as Trump and the entire convention hall stood.

▶ Read more about the Gold Star families featured at the RNC

JD Vance introduced himself to a national audience Wednesday after being chosen as Donald Trump’s running mate, sharing the story of his hardscrabble upbringing and making the case that his party best understands the challenges facing struggling Americans.

Speaking to a packed arena at the Republican National Convention, the Ohio senator cast himself as a fighter for a forgotten working class, making a direct appeal to the Rust Belt voters who helped drive Trump’s surprise 2016 victory and voicing their anger and frustration.

The 39-year-old Ohio senator is a relative political unknown, having served in the Senate for less than two years. He rapidly morphed in recent years from a bitter critic of the former president to an aggressive defender and is now positioned to become the future leader of the party and the torch-bearer of Trump’s “Make America Great Again” political movement.

The first millennial to join the top of a major party ticket, Vance enters the race as questions about the age of the men at the top — 78-year-old Trump and 81-year-old President Joe Biden — have been high on the list of voters’ concerns. He also joins Trump after an assassination attempt against the former president — in which Trump came perhaps millimeters from death or serious injury — underscoring the importance of a potential successor.

▶ Read more about Vance’s RNC speech

The third nights of conventions are traditionally about the running mate and how they round out a presidential ticket. Certainly, Vance has become a presence at the convention — mentions from the podium, his name now on signs together with Trump, appearances with the former president on the first two nights of the convention.

But Trump is a dominant figure — even when measured against other U.S. presidents and world leaders. Pick any speaker Wednesday and their most passionate pitches were not about “Donald Trump and JD Vance.” They were about Trump.

“This is a man I know and the president we need for four more years,” said Kellyanne Conway, a former Trump adviser. “He will always stand up for you.”

Trump’s former White House physician, Rep. Ronny Jackson of Texas, called Trump “the greatest president this country has ever had” and “a president who even took a bullet for our country.”

It’s Trump’s party and his alone. No running mate can change that, especially not a freshman senator who has yet to celebrate his 40th birthday.

▶ Read the AP’s takeaways from night 3 of the RNC.

The convention is gaveling out after a benediction from Rev. Packy Thompson of Houma, Lousiana.

Thompson thanked God for Trump. “I also thank you for protecting him from the evil that was perpetrated last Saturday,” he said.

And the gathering is adjourned until Thursday.

“Tonight, J.D. Vance, the poster boy for Project 2025, took center stage. But it’s working families and the middle class who will suffer if he’s allowed to stay there,” Michael Tyler, Biden campaign communication director, said.

“Backed by Silicon Valley and the billionaires who bought his vice presidential selection, Vance is Project 2025 in human form – an agenda that puts extremism and the ultra wealthy over our democracy.”

Vance made a pledge to voters: “I pledge to every American, no matter your party, I will give you everything I have.”

He added, “To serve you and to make this country a place where every dream you have for yourself, your family and your country will be possible once again.”

After the speech, Vance’s extended family flooded the stage to an unusual song for a Republican convention – Fleetwood Mac’s “Don’t Stop Thinking About Tomorrow.”

The song became a political staple in 1992 when a very different young politician from a humble background ran for national office. That was Bill Clinton, who is, of course, a Democrat.

Law enforcement officers gather at campaign rally site for Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump is empty Saturday, July 13, 2024, in Butler, Pa. Trump's campaign said in a statement that the former president was "fine" after a shooting at his rally in Butler (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Law enforcement officers gather at campaign rally site for Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump is empty Saturday, July 13, 2024, in Butler, Pa. Trump's campaign said in a statement that the former president was "fine" after a shooting at his rally in Butler (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump is covered by U.S. Secret Service agents at a campaign rally, Saturday, July 13, 2024, in Butler, Pa. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump is covered by U.S. Secret Service agents at a campaign rally, Saturday, July 13, 2024, in Butler, Pa. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump is surround by U.S. Secret Service agents at a campaign rally, Saturday, July 13, 2024, in Butler, Pa. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump is surround by U.S. Secret Service agents at a campaign rally, Saturday, July 13, 2024, in Butler, Pa. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump is helped off the stage at a campaign event in Butler, Pa., Saturday, July 13, 2024. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump is helped off the stage at a campaign event in Butler, Pa., Saturday, July 13, 2024. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump pumps his fist as he is helped off the stage at a campaign event in Butler, Pa., on Saturday, July 13, 2024. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump pumps his fist as he is helped off the stage at a campaign event in Butler, Pa., on Saturday, July 13, 2024. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar)

Wisconsin Carlos Jimenez dresses up as Captain America at the Republican National Convention Wednesday, July 17, 2024, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

Wisconsin Carlos Jimenez dresses up as Captain America at the Republican National Convention Wednesday, July 17, 2024, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

Republican vice presidential candidate Sen. JD Vance, R-Ohio, speaks during the Republican National Convention Wednesday, July 17, 2024, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

Republican vice presidential candidate Sen. JD Vance, R-Ohio, speaks during the Republican National Convention Wednesday, July 17, 2024, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump's shadow is seen as he departs the Republican National Convention Wednesday, July 17, 2024, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump's shadow is seen as he departs the Republican National Convention Wednesday, July 17, 2024, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

Vice Presidential Nominee Sen. JD Vance speaks during the Republican National Convention Wednesday, July 17, 2024, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

Vice Presidential Nominee Sen. JD Vance speaks during the Republican National Convention Wednesday, July 17, 2024, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump departs after the third day of the Republican National Convention at the Fiserv Forum, Wednesday, July 17, 2024, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump departs after the third day of the Republican National Convention at the Fiserv Forum, Wednesday, July 17, 2024, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

A general view during rehearsals at the 2024 Republican National Convention at the Fiserv Forum, Sunday, July 14, 2024, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

A general view during rehearsals at the 2024 Republican National Convention at the Fiserv Forum, Sunday, July 14, 2024, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Republican vice presidential candidate Sen. JD Vance, R-Ohio, gestures to the crowd after speaking at the 2024 Republican National Convention at the Fiserv Forum, Wednesday, July 17, 2024, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Republican vice presidential candidate Sen. JD Vance, R-Ohio, gestures to the crowd after speaking at the 2024 Republican National Convention at the Fiserv Forum, Wednesday, July 17, 2024, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Republican vice presidential candidate Sen. JD Vance, R-Ohio, speaks at the 2024 Republican National Convention at the Fiserv Forum, Wednesday, July 17, 2024, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Republican vice presidential candidate Sen. JD Vance, R-Ohio, speaks at the 2024 Republican National Convention at the Fiserv Forum, Wednesday, July 17, 2024, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Vice Presidential Nominee Sen. JD Vance and wife Usha Chilukuri Vance acknowledge the crowd during the Republican National Convention Wednesday, July 17, 2024, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Vice Presidential Nominee Sen. JD Vance and wife Usha Chilukuri Vance acknowledge the crowd during the Republican National Convention Wednesday, July 17, 2024, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

President Joe Biden and Maritza Rodriguez, Biden for President Latina adviser, greets patrons at Linda Michoacan Mexican Restaurant, during a stop in Las Vegas, Wednesday, July 17, 2024. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

President Joe Biden and Maritza Rodriguez, Biden for President Latina adviser, greets patrons at Linda Michoacan Mexican Restaurant, during a stop in Las Vegas, Wednesday, July 17, 2024. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

President Joe Biden walks up the steps of Air Force One at Harry Reid International Airport in Las Vegas, Wednesday, July 17, 2024. Biden has tested positive for the coronavirus, according to a speaker at the UnidosUS annual conference broadcast on the White House's YouTube channel. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

President Joe Biden walks up the steps of Air Force One at Harry Reid International Airport in Las Vegas, Wednesday, July 17, 2024. Biden has tested positive for the coronavirus, according to a speaker at the UnidosUS annual conference broadcast on the White House's YouTube channel. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump reacts during the Republican National Convention Wednesday, July 17, 2024, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump reacts during the Republican National Convention Wednesday, July 17, 2024, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke)

Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump talks to Sen. Marco Rubio during the Republican National Convention Wednesday, July 17, 2024, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

Republican presidential candidate former President Donald Trump talks to Sen. Marco Rubio during the Republican National Convention Wednesday, July 17, 2024, in Milwaukee. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

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