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Klick Health Wins Innovation Grand Prix, Triples Cannes Lions Since Day 1

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Klick Health Wins Innovation Grand Prix, Triples Cannes Lions Since Day 1
News

News

Klick Health Wins Innovation Grand Prix, Triples Cannes Lions Since Day 1

2024-06-21 21:43 Last Updated At:21:50

CANNES, France & TORONTO--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Jun 21, 2024--

Klick Health more than tripled the number of Lions it’s picked up over the past couple days at the Cannes Lions Festival of Creativity, earning an Innovation Grand Prix, three Entertainment Lions (a Gold, a Silver, and a Bronze), and a Silver Lion for Digital Craft. After earning a Gold in Pharma and a Bronze in Health & Wellness earlier this week, Klick’s latest honors bring its Cannes tally to seven thus far.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20240621211298/en/

Last night, after receiving the coveted Innovation Grand Prix for ‘Voice 2 Diabetes’, Klick Co-Founder and Chairman Leerom Segal said, “We our incredibly proud of the lifesaving innovations arising from Klick Labs and all our Klicksters who’ve been on this remarkable machine-learning journey. It began over a decade ago, before AI was sexy, and was entirely incubated in our lab against a legitimate market gap. We invested years of effort in this area with clinical trials made even more challenging through the pandemic. By remaining hyper-focused, embracing our hacker roots, and prioritizing outcomes over optics, our team didn’t just make diabetes screening ambient and accessible through a simple app, they invented a practical way to help the millions of people across the globe who have diabetes, but don’t know it.”

‘Voice 2 Diabetes’ is a smartphone app that turns voice samples into an equitable life-saving tool using AI to detect Type 2 diabetes through subtle vocal changes imperceptible to the human ear. Currently in submission with Health Canada as Software as a Medical Device (SaMD), ‘Voice 2 Diabetes’ also took home a Gold Pharma Lion on Monday.

At a press conference yesterday, Innovation Lions Jury President Diego Machado said, “The Innovation category consistently offers a glimpse into the future, transforming ideas into tangible realities...This year, the jury faced an exceptionally competitive range of contenders...In such a competitive year, one particular entry stood out to the Jury. This groundbreaking piece combines years of technological and medical research into a seamless user experience. Its excellence not only earns today’s top award but also paves the way for a new frontier in medical, mobile, and democratic access to healthcare.”

Inspired by culture of experimentation

Agency Chief Creative Officer Rich Levy said, “I joined Klick five years ago because I was looking for new and innovative ways to solve impossible problems in health and help propel creative to new heights. Receiving an Innovation Grand Prix plus Lions in Entertainment and Digital Craft is huge recognition of what makes Klick different. It also pays tribute to the incomparable, world-class team of Klicksters who bring it everyday and never stop believing in the power of creativity.”

On Tuesday, Klick won two Entertainment Lions – a Gold and Silver – for ' American Cancer Story,' the film it created for Change the Ref, an organization founded by the parents of Joaquin Oliver, who was tragically killed in the Parkland school shooting. The shocking coming-of-age short spotlights horrifying CDC statistics attributing cancer and gun violence as the number three and number one killers of children and teens in the U.S. It was co-written and directed by José Padilha, and produced by Taking Over Films, with original score by Maroon 5's James Valentine and VFX by Pierre Buffin.

According to Strategy magazine, Entertainment Jury President Geoffrey Edwards said ‘American Cancer Story’ “was probably the best demonstration of brand collaboration that we saw out of just about every piece of work. The twist at the very end was one that we all loved, and we didn’t see it coming.”

Klick also received a Silver Digital Craft Lion and a Bronze Entertainment Lion for the animated film ' 47.' Produced for Café Joyeux, a global family of cafe-restaurants that hires and trains people with intellectual and developmental disabilities, the film was inspired by the journey of a boy with Down syndrome. Klick co-created the film with Zombie Studio, Canja Audio Culture, and the Down syndrome community. It also won a Bronze Health & Wellness Lion on Monday.

Klick’s Latest Cannes Results

INNOVATION

PHARMA

HEALTH & WELLNESS

ENTERTAINMENT

DIGITAL CRAFT

FILM

FILM CRAFT

On Monday, Klick was also ranked the world’s overall number-two Healthcare Agency and number-two Healthcare Network of the Year for the second consecutive year.

About Klick Health

Klick Health is the world’s largest independent commercialization partner for life sciences, focused on hacking the boundaries of health by developing, launching, and supporting life sciences brands to achieve their full potential. The agency provides best-in-class marketing and advertising, media strategy and purchasing, medical affairs and medical communications, value and market access services, as well as enterprise omnichannel enablement among its specialized offerings. Klick’s client service is rooted in deep medical and scientific understanding, enabled by over 185 post-graduate, in-house medical experts; unrivaled decision sciences capabilities; and innovative, results-driven creative that has made it one of the most-awarded advertising agencies on the planet.

In 2023, Klick won 160 top creative honors and seven agency distinctions from the most respected advertising awards shows, including Clio Health Independent Agency of the Year, London International Awards’ Global and North American Independent Health Agency of the Year; and Cannes Lions’ #2 Healthcare Agency, #2 Healthcare Network, and #10 Independent Agency of the Year. Klick is also consistently ranked a Best Managed Company, Great Place to Work, Best Workplace for Women, Best Workplace for Inclusion, Best Workplace for Professional Services, Most Admired Corporate Culture, and a FORTUNE Best Workplace in Advertising.

Established in 1997, Klick Health (including Klick Katalyst and btwelve) has offices in New York, Philadelphia, Toronto, London, São Paulo, and Singapore. It is part of the Klick Group of companies, which also includes Klick Media Group, Klick Applied Sciences (including Klick Labs), Klick Consulting, Klick Ventures, and Sensei Labs. Follow Klick Health on LinkedIn and for more information on joining Klick, go to careers.klick.com.

Klick Health more than tripled the number of Lions it’s picked up over the past couple days at the Cannes Lions Festival of Creativity, earning an Innovation Grand Prix, three Entertainment Lions (a Gold, a Silver, and a Bronze), and a Silver Lion for Digital Craft. After earning a Gold in Pharma and a Bronze in Health & Wellness earlier this week, Klick’s latest honors bring its Cannes tally to seven thus far. (Photo: Business Wire)

Klick Health more than tripled the number of Lions it’s picked up over the past couple days at the Cannes Lions Festival of Creativity, earning an Innovation Grand Prix, three Entertainment Lions (a Gold, a Silver, and a Bronze), and a Silver Lion for Digital Craft. After earning a Gold in Pharma and a Bronze in Health & Wellness earlier this week, Klick’s latest honors bring its Cannes tally to seven thus far. (Photo: Business Wire)

YEKATERINBURG, Russia (AP) — Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich was convicted Friday of espionage and sentenced to 16 years in a maximum-security prison on charges that his employer and the U.S. government have rejected as fabricated.

The swift conclusion of the secretive trial in Russia’s highly politicized legal system could potentially clear the way for a prisoner swap between Moscow and Washington.

Gershkovich, his head shaved and looking thin, was calm as he stood in a glass defendants’ cage in the Sverdlovsk Regional Court. He listened impassively to the verdict but gave an occasional smile. When Judge Andrei Mineyev asked him if he had any questions about the verdict, he replied “No, your honor.”

After Mineyev finished reading the verdict, someone in the courtroom shouted, “Evan, we love you!”

Closing arguments took place behind closed doors and Gershkovich did not admit any guilt, according to the court’s press service. Prosecutors requested an 18-year sentence, but the judge opted for a shorter term.

“This disgraceful, sham conviction comes after Evan has spent 478 days in prison, wrongfully detained, away from his family and friends, prevented from reporting, all for doing his job as a journalist," Dow Jones CEO and Wall Street Journal Publisher Almar Latour and Editor in Chief Emma Tucker said in a statement.

“We will continue to do everything possible to press for Evan’s release and to support his family. Journalism is not a crime, and we will not rest until he’s released. This must end now,” the statement added.

Gershkovich, 32, was arrested March 29, 2023, while on a reporting trip to the Ural Mountains city of Yekaterinburg. Authorities claimed, without offering any evidence, that he was gathering secret information for the U.S.

He has been behind bars since his arrest, which will be counted as part of his sentence. Much of that was spent in Moscow’s notorious Lefortovo Prison — a czarist-era lockup used during Josef Stalin’s purges, when executions were carried out in its basement. He was transferred to Yekaterinburg for the trial.

Gershkovich was the first U.S. journalist taken into custody on espionage charges since Nicholas Daniloff in 1986, at the height of the Cold War. Foreign journalists in Russia were shocked by Gershkovich’s arrest, even though the country has enacted increasingly repressive laws on freedom of speech after sending troops into Ukraine.

Unlike the trial's opening on June 26 in Yekaterinburg and previous hearings in Moscow in which reporters were allowed to see Gershkovich briefly before sessions began, there was no access to the courtroom on Thursday when the trial resumed, but media was allowed in court on Friday for the verdict. Espionage and treason cases are typically shrouded in secrecy.

Russian courts convict more than 99% of defendants, and prosecutors can appeal sentences that they regard as too lenient. They even can appeal acquittals.

The U.S. State Department has declared Gershkovich “wrongfully detained,” committing the government to assertively seek his release.

Asked Friday about a possible prisoner swap involving Gershkovich, Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov refused to comment.

Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said Wednesday at the United Nations that Moscow and Washington’s “special services” are discussing an exchange involving Gershkovich. Russia has previously signaled the possibility of a swap, but said a verdict would have to come first. Even after a verdict, any such deal could take months or years.

State Department deputy spokesman Vedant Patel on Thursday declined to discuss negotiations about a possible exchange, but said: “We have been clear from the get-go that Evan did nothing wrong and should not have been detained. To date, Russia has provided no evidence of a crime and has failed to justify Evan’s continued detention.”

Russian President Vladimir Putin hinted earlier this year that he would be open to swapping Gershkovich for Vadim Krasikov, a Russian serving a life sentence for the 2019 killing in Berlin of a Georgian citizen of Chechen descent.

Lavrov on Wednesday reaffirmed the Kremlin claim that the government has “irrefutable evidence” against Gershkovich, although neither he nor any other Russian official has ever disclosed it.

Speaking to reporters after the verdict, prosecutor Mikael Ozdoyev reaffirmed that Gershkovich was accused of gathering secret information about production and repair of military equipment at Uralvagonzavod, a huge industrial plant about 150 kilometers (90 miles) north of Yekaterinburg that manufactures tanks. Ozdoyev repeated the claim that Gershkovich was acting on instructions from the CIA and tried to conceal his action.

U.S. officials have dismissed this as bogus.

“Evan has never been employed by the United States government. Evan is not a spy. Journalism is not a crime. And Evan should never have been detained in the first place,” White House national security spokesperson John Kirby said last month.

Russia’s interpretation of what constitutes high crimes like espionage and treason is broad, with authorities often going after people who share publicly available information with foreigners and accusing them of divulging state secrets.

Earlier this month, U.N. human rights experts said Russia violated international law by jailing Gershkovich and should release him “immediately.”

Arrests of Americans are increasingly common in Russia, with nine U.S. citizens known to be detained there as tensions between the two countries have escalated over fighting in Ukraine.

U.S. Ambassador to the U.N., Linda Thomas-Greenfield accused Moscow of treating “human beings as bargaining chips.” She singled out Gershkovich and ex-Marine Paul Whelan, 53, a corporate security director from Michigan, who is serving a 16-year sentence after being convicted on spying charges that he and the U.S. denied.

Since sending troops to Ukraine, Russian authorities have detained several U.S. nationals and other Westerners.

U.S. officials made an offer to swap Gershkovich last year that was rejected by Russia, and the Biden administration has not made public any possible deals since then.

The son of Soviet emigres who settled in New Jersey, Gershkovich was fluent in Russian and moved to the country in 2017 to work for The Moscow Times newspaper before being hired by the Journal in 2022.

Gershkovich had over a dozen closed hearings over the extension of his pretrial detention or appeals for his release. He was brought to the courthouse in handcuffs and appeared in the defendants cage, often smiling for the many cameras.

The periodic hearings gave his family, friends and U.S. officials a glimpse of him, and it was a break from his otherwise monotonous prison routine. But his mother, Ella Milman, said they also were a painful reminder that “he is not with us.”

Friends say that while he was in Lefortovo, Gershkovich was not allowed phone calls and was allowed out of his cell for only an hour a day to exercise. He usually spent the rest of his time reading books in English and Russian and writing letters to friends and family.

He relied on his sense of humor to get through the days, according to those close to him. From behind bars, he organized presents for friends on their birthdays.

As he entered his second year in captivity in March, Milman said he was “telling people not to freak out,” but she admitted the strain for friends and family was “taking a toll.”

The state prosecutor Mikael Ozdoev speaks to journalists after the court session inside the building of "Palace of justice," in Yekaterinburg, Russia, on Friday, July 19, 2024. A Russian court convicted Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich on espionage charges that his employer and the U.S. have rejected as fabricated. He was sentenced to 16 years in prison after a secretive and rapid trial in the country's highly politicized legal system. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

The state prosecutor Mikael Ozdoev speaks to journalists after the court session inside the building of "Palace of justice," in Yekaterinburg, Russia, on Friday, July 19, 2024. A Russian court convicted Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich on espionage charges that his employer and the U.S. have rejected as fabricated. He was sentenced to 16 years in prison after a secretive and rapid trial in the country's highly politicized legal system. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich stands listening to the verdict in a glass cage of a courtroom inside the building of "Palace of justice," in Yekaterinburg, Russia, on Friday, July 19, 2024. A Russian court convicted Gershkovich on espionage charges that his employer and the U.S. have rejected as fabricated. He was sentenced to 16 years in prison after a secretive and rapid trial in the country's highly politicized legal system. (AP Photo)

Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich stands listening to the verdict in a glass cage of a courtroom inside the building of "Palace of justice," in Yekaterinburg, Russia, on Friday, July 19, 2024. A Russian court convicted Gershkovich on espionage charges that his employer and the U.S. have rejected as fabricated. He was sentenced to 16 years in prison after a secretive and rapid trial in the country's highly politicized legal system. (AP Photo)

Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich stands listening to the verdict in a glass cage of a courtroom inside the building of "Palace of justice," in Yekaterinburg, Russia, on Friday, July 19, 2024. A Russian court convicted Gershkovich on espionage charges that his employer and the U.S. have rejected as fabricated. He was sentenced to 16 years in prison after a secretive and rapid trial in the country's highly politicized legal system. (AP Photo)

Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich stands listening to the verdict in a glass cage of a courtroom inside the building of "Palace of justice," in Yekaterinburg, Russia, on Friday, July 19, 2024. A Russian court convicted Gershkovich on espionage charges that his employer and the U.S. have rejected as fabricated. He was sentenced to 16 years in prison after a secretive and rapid trial in the country's highly politicized legal system. (AP Photo)

Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich stands listening to the verdict in a glass cage of a courtroom inside the building of "Palace of justice," in Yekaterinburg, Russia, on Friday, July 19, 2024. A Russian court convicted Gershkovich on espionage charges that his employer and the U.S. have rejected as fabricated. He was sentenced to 16 years in prison after a secretive and rapid trial in the country's highly politicized legal system. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich stands listening to the verdict in a glass cage of a courtroom inside the building of "Palace of justice," in Yekaterinburg, Russia, on Friday, July 19, 2024. A Russian court convicted Gershkovich on espionage charges that his employer and the U.S. have rejected as fabricated. He was sentenced to 16 years in prison after a secretive and rapid trial in the country's highly politicized legal system. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich, second left, stands listening to the verdict in a glass cage of a courtroom inside the building of "Palace of justice," in Yekaterinburg, Russia, on Friday, July 19, 2024. A Russian court convicted Gershkovich on espionage charges that his employer and the U.S. have rejected as fabricated. He was sentenced to 16 years in prison after a secretive and rapid trial in the country's highly politicized legal system. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich, second left, stands listening to the verdict in a glass cage of a courtroom inside the building of "Palace of justice," in Yekaterinburg, Russia, on Friday, July 19, 2024. A Russian court convicted Gershkovich on espionage charges that his employer and the U.S. have rejected as fabricated. He was sentenced to 16 years in prison after a secretive and rapid trial in the country's highly politicized legal system. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

FILE - This combination of photos shows Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich at the Moscow City Court in Moscow and the Sverdlovsk Regional Court in Yekaterinburg, from top left to right, on April 18, 2023, Sept. 19, 2023, Oct. 10, 2023, and from bottom left to right, on Dec. 14, 2023, April 23, 2024, June 26, 2024. (AP Photo, File)

FILE - This combination of photos shows Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich at the Moscow City Court in Moscow and the Sverdlovsk Regional Court in Yekaterinburg, from top left to right, on April 18, 2023, Sept. 19, 2023, Oct. 10, 2023, and from bottom left to right, on Dec. 14, 2023, April 23, 2024, June 26, 2024. (AP Photo, File)

Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich stands listening to the verdict in a glass cage of a courtroom inside the building of "Palace of justice," in Yekaterinburg, Russia, on Friday, July 19, 2024. A Russian court convicted Gershkovich on espionage charges that his employer and the U.S. have rejected as fabricated. He was sentenced to 16 years in prison after a secretive and rapid trial in the country's highly politicized legal system. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich stands listening to the verdict in a glass cage of a courtroom inside the building of "Palace of justice," in Yekaterinburg, Russia, on Friday, July 19, 2024. A Russian court convicted Gershkovich on espionage charges that his employer and the U.S. have rejected as fabricated. He was sentenced to 16 years in prison after a secretive and rapid trial in the country's highly politicized legal system. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich stands listening to the verdict in a glass cage of a courtroom inside the building of "Palace of justice," in Yekaterinburg, Russia, on Friday, July 19, 2024. A Russian court convicted Gershkovich on espionage charges that his employer and the U.S. have rejected as fabricated. He was sentenced to 16 years in prison after a secretive and rapid trial in the country's highly politicized legal system. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich stands listening to the verdict in a glass cage of a courtroom inside the building of "Palace of justice," in Yekaterinburg, Russia, on Friday, July 19, 2024. A Russian court convicted Gershkovich on espionage charges that his employer and the U.S. have rejected as fabricated. He was sentenced to 16 years in prison after a secretive and rapid trial in the country's highly politicized legal system. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich stands listening to the verdict in a glass cage of a courtroom inside the building of "Palace of justice," in Yekaterinburg, Russia, on Friday, July 19, 2024. A Russian court convicted Gershkovich on espionage charges that his employer and the U.S. have rejected as fabricated. He was sentenced to 16 years in prison after a secretive and rapid trial in the country's highly politicized legal system. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich stands listening to the verdict in a glass cage of a courtroom inside the building of "Palace of justice," in Yekaterinburg, Russia, on Friday, July 19, 2024. A Russian court convicted Gershkovich on espionage charges that his employer and the U.S. have rejected as fabricated. He was sentenced to 16 years in prison after a secretive and rapid trial in the country's highly politicized legal system. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich stands listening to the verdict in a glass cage of a courtroom inside the building of "Palace of justice," in Yekaterinburg, Russia, on Friday, July 19, 2024. A Russian court convicted Gershkovich on espionage charges that his employer and the U.S. have rejected as fabricated. He was sentenced to 16 years in prison after a secretive and rapid trial in the country's highly politicized legal system. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich stands listening to the verdict in a glass cage of a courtroom inside the building of "Palace of justice," in Yekaterinburg, Russia, on Friday, July 19, 2024. A Russian court convicted Gershkovich on espionage charges that his employer and the U.S. have rejected as fabricated. He was sentenced to 16 years in prison after a secretive and rapid trial in the country's highly politicized legal system. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

Evan Gershkovich's lawyer Maria Korchagina walks inside the court building of "Palace of justice," in Yekaterinburg, Russia, on Friday, July 19, 2024, during the trial of Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich's suspected spying activities. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

Evan Gershkovich's lawyer Maria Korchagina walks inside the court building of "Palace of justice," in Yekaterinburg, Russia, on Friday, July 19, 2024, during the trial of Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich's suspected spying activities. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

Evan Gershkovich's lawyer Maria Korchagina, foreground, walks inside the court building of "Palace of justice," in Yekaterinburg, Russia, on Friday, July 19, 2024, during the trial of Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich's suspected spying activities. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

Evan Gershkovich's lawyer Maria Korchagina, foreground, walks inside the court building of "Palace of justice," in Yekaterinburg, Russia, on Friday, July 19, 2024, during the trial of Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich's suspected spying activities. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

FILE - Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich stands in a glass cage in a courtroom in Yekaterinburg, Russia, Wednesday, June 26, 2024. Court officials say closing arguments in the espionage trial of U.S. journalist Evan Gershkovich will be held Friday, July 19, 2024, as the proceedings picked up speed in a case that has seen the reporter held in pre-trial custody for over a year. (AP Photo, File)

FILE - Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich stands in a glass cage in a courtroom in Yekaterinburg, Russia, Wednesday, June 26, 2024. Court officials say closing arguments in the espionage trial of U.S. journalist Evan Gershkovich will be held Friday, July 19, 2024, as the proceedings picked up speed in a case that has seen the reporter held in pre-trial custody for over a year. (AP Photo, File)

The Lady Justice statue is seen through a traffic light atop of the court building with the words reading, "Palace of justice," on the front in Yekaterinburg, Russia Friday, July 19, 2024, ahead of the trial of Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich's suspected spying activities. Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

The Lady Justice statue is seen through a traffic light atop of the court building with the words reading, "Palace of justice," on the front in Yekaterinburg, Russia Friday, July 19, 2024, ahead of the trial of Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich's suspected spying activities. Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

People walk past the court building with the words reading, "Palace of justice," on the front in Yekaterinburg, Russia, Friday, July 19, 2024, prior to the trial of Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich's suspected spying activities. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

People walk past the court building with the words reading, "Palace of justice," on the front in Yekaterinburg, Russia, Friday, July 19, 2024, prior to the trial of Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich's suspected spying activities. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

A Russian Federal Bailiffs Service employee patrols around the court building with the words reading, "Palace of justice," on the front in Yekaterinburg, Russia, on Friday, July 19, 2024, ahead of the trial of Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich's suspected spying activities. Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

A Russian Federal Bailiffs Service employee patrols around the court building with the words reading, "Palace of justice," on the front in Yekaterinburg, Russia, on Friday, July 19, 2024, ahead of the trial of Wall Street Journal reporter Evan Gershkovich's suspected spying activities. Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)

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