Skip to Content Facebook Feature Image

China-Kyrgyzstan-Uzbekistan railway to make landlocked Kyrgyzstan unblocked: Kyrgyz PM

China

China

China

China-Kyrgyzstan-Uzbekistan railway to make landlocked Kyrgyzstan unblocked: Kyrgyz PM

2024-06-22 14:18 Last Updated At:20:47

The China-Kyrgyzstan-Uzbekistan railway is expected to transform Kyrgyzstan from a landlocked country into one with huge transit potential and make Central Asia a cultural crossroads and trade and logistics hub, said Kyrgyz Prime Minister Akylbek Japarov in a recent interview with China Central Television (CCTV).

On June 6, Chinese President Xi Jinping, Kyrgyz President Sadyr Japarov and Uzbek President Shavkat Mirziyoyev congratulated via video link the signing of a trilateral intergovernmental agreement in Beijing on the China-Kyrgyzstan-Uzbekistan railway project.

The railway will begin in Kashgar, northwest China's Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, and enter the territory of Uzbekistan through Kyrgyzstan. In the future, it will reach West Asia and South Asia.

It is estimated that the railway will shorten the route between China and Europe by about 900 kilometers and reduce freight transit time by eight days.

"Regrettably, Kyrgyzstan has not constructed any new railways in over 30 years since gaining independence. But now, the China-Kyrgyzstan-Uzbekistan railway is poised to transform Kyrgyzstan from a landlocked country into one with huge transit potential. On June 6, in the presence of Chinese President Xi Jinping, Kyrgyz President Sadyr Japarov and Uzbek President Shavkat Mirziyoyev, the relevant ministries of the three countries signed an intergovernmental agreement on the China-Kyrgyzstan-Uzbekistan railway project. This railway, known as the 'Middle Corridor,' will be the shortest route between Shanghai and Paris. It will turn the entire Central Asia, not just Kyrgyzstan, into a land route between two major economies, China and the European Union," Japarov said.

Japarov emphasized that this project is crucial for Kyrgyzstan's global connectivity, allowing his landlocked country to connect with the rest of the world.

"The construction and operation of this railway will not only make Central Asia a cultural crossroads but also a trade and logistics hub. With the help of this railway, Kyrgyzstan will be able to construct railways within the territory and build the first transit station along the China-Kyrgyzstan-Uzbekistan railway through its own efforts. In the future, goods transported via this railway will have two destinations: one through the central highways of Uzbekistan and the other northward through Kazakhstan, reaching Russia. As a result, Kyrgyzstan will fully leverage its transit potential and convert itself from a landlocked country into one with access to the sea through the support of the China-Kyrgyzstan-Uzbekistan railway. This represents a significant implementation of the Belt and Road Initiative proposed by Chinese President Xi Jinping," Japarov said.

As an important passage along the ancient Silk Road, the development of Central Asia has long been constrained due to its geographical location deep within the Asian continent and the lack of ports.

Therefore, for landlocked countries such as Kyrgyzstan and Uzbekistan, the construction of cross-border railways enables these countries to overcome geographical limitations and provide them with a significant boost for their social and economic progress.

Over the nearly three decades, China, Kyrgyzstan, and Uzbekistan have engaged in multiple rounds of consultations and negotiations regarding the cross-border railway project.

Last May, the feasibility study of the railway project was basically completed, which put the implementation of the project on a fast track.

In just one year, the three countries have worked closely together to press ahead with consultation on the details and managed to narrow the gaps on major issues and accumulate common understandings, and finally signed a trilateral agreement on the project on June 6, which signifies the transformation of the China-Kyrgyzstan-Uzbekistan railway from a mere concept into a tangible reality.

China-Kyrgyzstan-Uzbekistan railway to make landlocked Kyrgyzstan unblocked: Kyrgyz PM

China-Kyrgyzstan-Uzbekistan railway to make landlocked Kyrgyzstan unblocked: Kyrgyz PM

China-Kyrgyzstan-Uzbekistan railway to make landlocked Kyrgyzstan unblocked: Kyrgyz PM

China-Kyrgyzstan-Uzbekistan railway to make landlocked Kyrgyzstan unblocked: Kyrgyz PM

China-Kyrgyzstan-Uzbekistan railway to make landlocked Kyrgyzstan unblocked: Kyrgyz PM

China-Kyrgyzstan-Uzbekistan railway to make landlocked Kyrgyzstan unblocked: Kyrgyz PM

Next Article

Sewing workshop struggles in ruins to mend clothes for displaced Gaza residents

2024-07-19 22:05 Last Updated At:22:57

A sewing workshop has been operating in ruins to mend worn-out clothes for displaced Palestinians in the war-torn Gaza Strip, as Israel's continuous destruction of the enclave has made new clothes a luxury almost impossible to come by or afford.

The UN humanitarian coordinator for Gaza said in early July that a total of 1.9 million people, around 80 percent of the region's population, were displaced.

However, in a room behind demolished walls in the southern Gaza Strip city of Khan Younis, a sewing workshop has quietly been set up, with some workers using sewing machines recovered from a bombed-out tailoring workshop to provide mending services.

"I opened the workshop after I was able to recover the sewing machines and some fabric from the old factory. I work to serve all the displaced people of the Gaza Strip, such as people from the al-Mawasi area in Khan Younis and the Nuseirat [refugee camp]," said Abu Samer Shaat, the workshop owner.

The prolonged and intense Israel-Hamas conflict has forced a great number of Gazan families to flee from one place to another. Due to the continuous destruction of their homes and shelters, all they left were the clothes they wear.

Shops, markets and factories were turned into rubble as a result of the Israeli bombing, and the surviving trading sites in Gaza also suffer a shortage of clothes and fabrics due to Israel's ban on entry of goods and materials.

"Our clothes became loose. We had to take them to tailors to mend them as they had become worn out. There are no new clothes in the market. If there are a few, the prices will be very high, and we will not be able to buy them because we do not have any source of income. Our entire lives have come to a halt," said Hoda Al-Maghari, a displaced Palestinian.

Sewing workshop struggles in ruins to mend clothes for displaced Gaza residents

Sewing workshop struggles in ruins to mend clothes for displaced Gaza residents

Recommended Articles