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Thermo Fisher Scientific Introduces the Only Fully Automated Plasmid Purification System to Help Accelerate Discovery and Development of Therapies

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Thermo Fisher Scientific Introduces the Only Fully Automated Plasmid Purification System to Help Accelerate Discovery and Development of Therapies
News

News

Thermo Fisher Scientific Introduces the Only Fully Automated Plasmid Purification System to Help Accelerate Discovery and Development of Therapies

2024-06-25 20:16 Last Updated At:20:20

WALTHAM, Mass.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Jun 25, 2024--

Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc., the world leader in serving science, today introduced the Thermo Scientific™ KingFisher™ PlasmidPro Maxi Processor* (PlasmidPro), the only fully automated maxi-scale plasmid DNA (pDNA) purification system. PlasmidPro enables innovation at scale, providing complete automation across mini and maxi scale purification and delivering high-purity plasmid without manual column preparation and intervention. This is the latest addition to the Thermo Scientific KingFisher instrument portfolio which offers a wide range of plasmid DNA extraction products to help drive efficiency and consistency.

This press release features multimedia. View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20240625551557/en/

Globally, there are approximately 1,700 clinical trials for cell and gene therapies. 1 In recent years, plasmids have been instrumental in the development of cell and gene therapies, monoclonal antibody therapies and mRNA therapies and vaccines. Plasmids are commonly used in a variety of molecular biology applications, including transfection, protein expression, gene therapy, DNA sequencing, and vaccine development. They are a critical laboratory tool that can act as a carrier to deliver desired genes or DNA fragments into target cells.

“With the rapidly growing demand for plasmid DNA purification for emerging therapies, we are proud to accelerate the purification process with a ‘press and go’ solution,” said Amy Butler, president, biosciences, Thermo Fisher Scientific. “By fully automating a critical step in plasmid DNA manufacturing, the PlasmidPro DNA purification system can give time back to our customers to focus on their research and bringing life-saving therapies and vaccines to patients.”

The PlasmidPro purification system requires no set-up, centrifugation or pipetting and completely automates the purification process from culture to plasmid. The product uses a self-contained cartridge pre-filled with all necessary reagents to perform the purification, eliminating the need for additional instrumentation and plastics while minimizing set-up time and contamination risks. Using 100-150 mL of fresh overnight culture, the system is capable of producing up to 1.5 mg DNA yield.

For more information on PlasmidPro, please visit thermofisher.com/plasmidpro.

*For research use only. Not for use in diagnostic procedures.

About Thermo Fisher Scientific

Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc. is the world leader in serving science, with annual revenue over $40 billion. Our Mission is to enable our customers to make the world healthier, cleaner and safer. Whether our customers are accelerating life sciences research, solving complex analytical challenges, increasing productivity in their laboratories, improving patient health through diagnostics or the development and manufacture of life-changing therapies, we are here to support them. Our global team delivers an unrivaled combination of innovative technologies, purchasing convenience and pharmaceutical services through our industry-leading brands, including Thermo Scientific, Applied Biosystems, Invitrogen, Fisher Scientific, Unity Lab Services, Patheon and PPD. For more information, please visit www.thermofisher.com.

1https://alliancerm.org/wp-content/uploads/2024/05/Trials_Final_Q1_2024.pdf

Thermo Scientific™ KingFisher™ PlasmidPro Maxi Processor, the only fully automated maxi-scale plasmid DNA (pDNA) purification system. (Photo: Business Wire)

Thermo Scientific™ KingFisher™ PlasmidPro Maxi Processor, the only fully automated maxi-scale plasmid DNA (pDNA) purification system. (Photo: Business Wire)

THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — The top United Nations court said Friday that Israel’s presence in the occupied Palestinian territories is unlawful and called on it to end, and for settlement construction to stop immediately, issuing an unprecedented, sweeping condemnation of Israel’s rule over the lands it captured 57 years ago.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu quickly denounced the nonbinding opinion issued by the 15-judge panel of the International Court of Justice, saying the territories are part of the Jewish people's historic homeland. But the resounding breadth of the decision could impact international opinion and fuel moves for unilateral recognition of a Palestinian state.

The judges pointed to a wide list of policies, including the building and expansion of Israeli settlements in the West Bank and east Jerusalem, use of the area's natural resources, the annexation and imposition of permanent control over lands and discriminatory policies against Palestinians, all of which it said violated international law.

The court said Israel had no right to sovereignty in the territories, was violating international laws against acquiring territory by force and was impeding Palestinians' right to self-determination. It said other nations were obliged not to “render aid or assistance in maintaining” Israel’s presence in the territories. It said Israel must end settlement construction immediately and that existing settlements must be removed, according to a summary of the more than 80-page opinion read out by court President Nawaf Salam.

Israel’s “abuse of its status as the occupying power” renders its “presence in the occupied Palestinian territory unlawful,” the court said, saying its presence must be ended as “rapidly as possible.”

The court's opinion, sought by the U.N. General Assembly after a Palestinian request, came against the backdrop of Israel’s devastating military assault on Gaza, which was triggered by the Hamas-led attacks in southern Israel on Oct. 7. In a separate case, the International Court of Justice is considering a South African claim that Israel’s campaign in Gaza amounts to genocide, a claim that Israel vehemently denies.

The court said the General Assembly and Security Council — where staunch Israeli ally the United States holds a veto — should consider “the precise modalities” to end Israel's presence in the territories.

U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres will promptly transmit the advisory opinion to the 193-member world body and “it is for the General Assembly to decide how to proceed in the matter,” U.N. deputy spokesperson Farhan Haq said.

The secretary-general reiterates his call for Israel and the Palestinians to engage “on the long-delayed political path towards ending the occupation and resolving the conflict in line with international law, relevant U.N. resolutions and bilateral agreements,” the spokesperson said.

Guterres also stressed that a two-state solution is “the only viable path” to seeing Israel and “a fully independent, democratic, contiguous, viable and sovereign Palestinian state” living side by side in peace and security, Haq said.

Israel, which normally considers the United Nations and international tribunals as unfair and biased, didn't send a legal team to the hearings. Instead, it submitted written comments, saying that the questions put to the court are prejudiced and fail to address Israeli security concerns. Israeli officials have said the court's intervention could undermine the peace process, which has been stagnant for more than a decade.

“The Jewish people are not conquerors in their own land — not in our eternal capital Jerusalem and not in the land of our ancestors in Judea and Samaria,” Netanyahu said in a statement issued by his office, using the biblical terms for the West Bank. “No false decision in The Hague will distort this historical truth and likewise the legality of Israeli settlement in all the territories of our homeland cannot be contested.”

Speaking outside the court, Riad Malki, an adviser to Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas, called the opinion “a watershed moment for Palestine, for justice and for international law.”

He said other nations must now “uphold the clear obligations" outlined by the court. "No actions of any kind … to support Israel’s illegal occupation.”

Hamas welcomed the court's decision and said in a statement that “serious steps on the ground” need to be taken in response.

Israel captured the West Bank, east Jerusalem and Gaza Strip in the 1967 Mideast war. The Palestinians seek all three areas for an independent state.

Israel considers the West Bank to be disputed territory, the future of which should be decided in negotiations, while it has moved populations there in settlements to solidify its hold. It has annexed east Jerusalem in a move that isn't internationally recognized, while it withdrew from Gaza in 2005 but maintained a blockade of the territory after Hamas took power in 2007. The international community generally considers all three areas to be occupied territory.

The court’s decision strikes at the heart of the ambiguity of Israel’s administration of the territories. Israel hasn't annexed the West Bank — though settler groups have pressed it to do so — but it calls it part of its homeland and has effectively treated it as an extension of the nation. Along with the settlements, it has appropriated large swaths of the territory as “state lands.” At the same time, Netanyahu’s government has repeatedly rejected the creation of any Palestinian state. Abbas’ Palestinian Authority has been restricted to control over divided enclaves scattered around the West Bank.

The Palestinians presented arguments at hearings in February, along with 49 other nations and three international organizations. In the hearings, Malki accused Israel of apartheid and urged the United Nations’ top court to declare that Israel’s occupation of lands sought by the Palestinians is illegal and must end immediately and unconditionally for any hope for a two-state future to survive.

Erwin van Veen, a senior research fellow at the Clingendael think tank in The Hague, said before the decision that a ruling that Israel’s policies breach international law would “isolate Israel further internationally, at least from a legal point of view.”

He said such a ruling would remove "any kind of legal, political, philosophical underpinning of the Israeli expansion project.” It could also increase the number of countries that recognize a Palestinian state, in particular in the Western world, following the recent example of Spain, Norway and Ireland, he said.

It's not the first time the ICJ has been asked to give its legal opinion on Israeli policies. Two decades ago, the court ruled that Israel’s West Bank separation barrier was “contrary to international law.” Israel boycotted those proceedings, saying they were politically motivated.

Israel says the barrier is a security measure. Palestinians say the structure amounts to a massive land grab, because it frequently dips into the West Bank.

The court said that Israel's construction of settlements in the West Bank violated international laws prohibiting countries from moving their population into territories they occupy.

Israel has built well over 100 settlements, according to the anti-settlement monitoring group Peace Now. The West Bank settler population has grown by more than 15% in the past five years to more than 500,000 Israelis, according to a pro-settler group. Their residents are Israeli citizens governed by domestic law and served by government ministries, services, banks and other businesses — effectively integrating them into Israel.

Israel also has annexed east Jerusalem and considers the entire city to be its capital. An additional 200,000 Israelis live in settlements built in east Jerusalem that Israel considers to be neighborhoods of its capital. Palestinian residents of the city face systematic discrimination, making it difficult for them to build new homes or expand existing ones.

The international community considers all settlements to be illegal or obstacles to peace since they are built on lands sought by the Palestinians for their state.

Netanyahu’s hard-line government is dominated by settlers and their political supporters. Netanyahu has given his Finance Minister, Bezalel Smotrich, a former settler leader, unprecedented authority over settlement policy. Smotrich has used this position to cement Israel’s control over the West Bank by pushing forward plans to build more settlement homes and to legalize outposts.

Associated Press writer Edith M. Lederer contributed from the United Nations.

Palestinian foreign policy advisor Riad Malki speaks to media at the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday, July 19, 2024. The top U.N. court said Friday that Israel’s presence in the Palestinian occupied territories is “unlawful” and called on it to end and for settlement construction to stop immediately, issuing an unprecedented, sweeping condemnation of Israel’s rule over the lands it captured 57 years ago. (AP Photo/Phil Nijhuis)

Palestinian foreign policy advisor Riad Malki speaks to media at the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday, July 19, 2024. The top U.N. court said Friday that Israel’s presence in the Palestinian occupied territories is “unlawful” and called on it to end and for settlement construction to stop immediately, issuing an unprecedented, sweeping condemnation of Israel’s rule over the lands it captured 57 years ago. (AP Photo/Phil Nijhuis)

Palestinian foreign policy advisor Riad Malki speaks to media at the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday, July 19, 2024. The top U.N. court said Friday that Israel’s presence in the Palestinian occupied territories is “unlawful” and called on it to end and for settlement construction to stop immediately, issuing an unprecedented, sweeping condemnation of Israel’s rule over the lands it captured 57 years ago. (AP Photo/Phil Nijhuis)

Palestinian foreign policy advisor Riad Malki speaks to media at the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday, July 19, 2024. The top U.N. court said Friday that Israel’s presence in the Palestinian occupied territories is “unlawful” and called on it to end and for settlement construction to stop immediately, issuing an unprecedented, sweeping condemnation of Israel’s rule over the lands it captured 57 years ago. (AP Photo/Phil Nijhuis)

Palestinian foreign policy advisor Riad Malki speaks to media at the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday, July 19, 2024. The top U.N. court said Friday that Israel’s presence in the Palestinian occupied territories is “unlawful” and called on it to end and for settlement construction to stop immediately, issuing an unprecedented, sweeping condemnation of Israel’s rule over the lands it captured 57 years ago. (AP Photo/Phil Nijhuis)

Palestinian foreign policy advisor Riad Malki speaks to media at the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday, July 19, 2024. The top U.N. court said Friday that Israel’s presence in the Palestinian occupied territories is “unlawful” and called on it to end and for settlement construction to stop immediately, issuing an unprecedented, sweeping condemnation of Israel’s rule over the lands it captured 57 years ago. (AP Photo/Phil Nijhuis)

Palestinian foreign policy advisor Riad Malki and other members of the legal team take their seats before judges enter the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday July 19, 2024, where the United Nations top court is delivering a nonbinding advisory opinion Friday on the legality of Israel's 57-year occupation of lands sought for a Palestinian state, a ruling that could have more effect on international opinion than it will on Israeli policies. (AP Photo/Phil Nijhuis)

Palestinian foreign policy advisor Riad Malki and other members of the legal team take their seats before judges enter the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday July 19, 2024, where the United Nations top court is delivering a nonbinding advisory opinion Friday on the legality of Israel's 57-year occupation of lands sought for a Palestinian state, a ruling that could have more effect on international opinion than it will on Israeli policies. (AP Photo/Phil Nijhuis)

Palestinian foreign policy advisor Riad Malki and other members of the legal team take their seats before judges enter the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday July 19, 2024, where the United Nations top court is delivering a nonbinding advisory opinion Friday on the legality of Israel's 57-year occupation of lands sought for a Palestinian state, a ruling that could have more effect on international opinion than it will on Israeli policies. (AP Photo/Phil Nijhuis)

Palestinian foreign policy advisor Riad Malki and other members of the legal team take their seats before judges enter the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday July 19, 2024, where the United Nations top court is delivering a nonbinding advisory opinion Friday on the legality of Israel's 57-year occupation of lands sought for a Palestinian state, a ruling that could have more effect on international opinion than it will on Israeli policies. (AP Photo/Phil Nijhuis)

Palestinian foreign policy advisor Riad Malki before judges enter the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday July 19, 2024, where the United Nations top court is delivering a nonbinding advisory opinion Friday on the legality of Israel's 57-year occupation of lands sought for a Palestinian state, a ruling that could have more effect on international opinion than it will on Israeli policies. (AP Photo/Phil Nijhuis)

Palestinian foreign policy advisor Riad Malki before judges enter the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday July 19, 2024, where the United Nations top court is delivering a nonbinding advisory opinion Friday on the legality of Israel's 57-year occupation of lands sought for a Palestinian state, a ruling that could have more effect on international opinion than it will on Israeli policies. (AP Photo/Phil Nijhuis)

Palestinian foreign policy advisor Riad Malki meets one one the Israeli team members before judges enter the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday July 19, 2024, where the United Nations top court is delivering a nonbinding advisory opinion Friday on the legality of Israel's 57-year occupation of lands sought for a Palestinian state, a ruling that could have more effect on international opinion than it will on Israeli policies. (AP Photo/Phil Nijhuis)

Palestinian foreign policy advisor Riad Malki meets one one the Israeli team members before judges enter the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday July 19, 2024, where the United Nations top court is delivering a nonbinding advisory opinion Friday on the legality of Israel's 57-year occupation of lands sought for a Palestinian state, a ruling that could have more effect on international opinion than it will on Israeli policies. (AP Photo/Phil Nijhuis)

Journalists take images of Israel's legal team, before Judges enter the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday July 19, 2024, where the United Nations top court is delivering a nonbinding advisory opinion Friday on the legality of Israel's 57-year occupation of lands sought for a Palestinian state, a ruling that could have more effect on international opinion than it will on Israeli policies. (AP Photo/Phil Nijhuis)

Journalists take images of Israel's legal team, before Judges enter the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday July 19, 2024, where the United Nations top court is delivering a nonbinding advisory opinion Friday on the legality of Israel's 57-year occupation of lands sought for a Palestinian state, a ruling that could have more effect on international opinion than it will on Israeli policies. (AP Photo/Phil Nijhuis)

Palestinian foreign policy advisor Riad Malki meets one one the Israeli team members before judges enter the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday July 19, 2024, where the United Nations top court is delivering a nonbinding advisory opinion Friday on the legality of Israel's 57-year occupation of lands sought for a Palestinian state, a ruling that could have more effect on international opinion than it will on Israeli policies. (AP Photo/Phil Nijhuis)

Palestinian foreign policy advisor Riad Malki meets one one the Israeli team members before judges enter the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday July 19, 2024, where the United Nations top court is delivering a nonbinding advisory opinion Friday on the legality of Israel's 57-year occupation of lands sought for a Palestinian state, a ruling that could have more effect on international opinion than it will on Israeli policies. (AP Photo/Phil Nijhuis)

Palestinian foreign policy advisor Riad Malki meets one one the Israeli team members before judges enter the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday July 19, 2024, where the United Nations top court is delivering a nonbinding advisory opinion Friday on the legality of Israel's 57-year occupation of lands sought for a Palestinian state, a ruling that could have more effect on international opinion than it will on Israeli policies. (AP Photo/Phil Nijhuis)

Palestinian foreign policy advisor Riad Malki meets one one the Israeli team members before judges enter the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday July 19, 2024, where the United Nations top court is delivering a nonbinding advisory opinion Friday on the legality of Israel's 57-year occupation of lands sought for a Palestinian state, a ruling that could have more effect on international opinion than it will on Israeli policies. (AP Photo/Phil Nijhuis)

Journalists take images of Israel's legal team, before Judges enter the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday July 19, 2024, where the United Nations top court is delivering a nonbinding advisory opinion Friday on the legality of Israel's 57-year occupation of lands sought for a Palestinian state, a ruling that could have more effect on international opinion than it will on Israeli policies. (AP Photo/Phil Nijhuis)

Journalists take images of Israel's legal team, before Judges enter the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday July 19, 2024, where the United Nations top court is delivering a nonbinding advisory opinion Friday on the legality of Israel's 57-year occupation of lands sought for a Palestinian state, a ruling that could have more effect on international opinion than it will on Israeli policies. (AP Photo/Phil Nijhuis)

The Judges enter the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday July 19, 2024, where the United Nations top court is delivering a nonbinding advisory opinion Friday on the legality of Israel's 57-year occupation of lands sought for a Palestinian state, a ruling that could have more effect on international opinion than it will on Israeli policies. (AP Photo/Phil Nijhuis)

The Judges enter the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday July 19, 2024, where the United Nations top court is delivering a nonbinding advisory opinion Friday on the legality of Israel's 57-year occupation of lands sought for a Palestinian state, a ruling that could have more effect on international opinion than it will on Israeli policies. (AP Photo/Phil Nijhuis)

Palestinian foreign policy advisor Riad Malki and other members of the legal team take their seats before judges enter the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday July 19, 2024, where the United Nations top court is delivering a nonbinding advisory opinion Friday on the legality of Israel's 57-year occupation of lands sought for a Palestinian state, a ruling that could have more effect on international opinion than it will on Israeli policies. (AP Photo/Phil Nijhuis)

Palestinian foreign policy advisor Riad Malki and other members of the legal team take their seats before judges enter the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday July 19, 2024, where the United Nations top court is delivering a nonbinding advisory opinion Friday on the legality of Israel's 57-year occupation of lands sought for a Palestinian state, a ruling that could have more effect on international opinion than it will on Israeli policies. (AP Photo/Phil Nijhuis)

FILE - A view of the Peace Palace, which houses the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, on Jan. 26, 2024. (AP Photo/Patrick Post, File)

FILE - A view of the Peace Palace, which houses the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, on Jan. 26, 2024. (AP Photo/Patrick Post, File)

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