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Supporters of a proposed voter ID amendment in Nevada turn in thousands of signatures for review

News

Supporters of a proposed voter ID amendment in Nevada turn in thousands of signatures for review
News

News

Supporters of a proposed voter ID amendment in Nevada turn in thousands of signatures for review

2024-06-26 05:45 Last Updated At:05:51

RENO, Nev. (AP) — Supporters of a proposed constitutional amendment that would require voters to show photo identification at the polls have turned in signatures as part of an effort to get the proposal on the 2024 ballot.

The Repair the Vote political action committee submitted about 179,000 signatures to state and county election officials for review, the organization said Monday. Just over 100,000 signatures need to be valid for the measure to be eligible for the ballot.

The measure would then have to be approved by voters in November and again in 2026 to amend the Nevada Constitution.

Along with the photo identification requirement, the initiative also calls for an extra layer of verification for mail ballots, such as the last four digits of a driver’s license or Social Security number.

“By requiring voter identification, we aim to strengthen the integrity of our elections and ensure that every vote counts,” said David Gibbs, the chairman of the PAC in a statement.

Voter ID has been a contentious issue in the Western swing state, particularly in its split-party government. Republican Gov. Joe Lombardo outlined it as one of his main priorities last year, but Democrats who control the state Legislature refused to give the issue a hearing.

The Nevada Supreme Court last month ruled unanimously that signatures could be gathered for the ballot initiative. The ruling was in response to a lawsuit filed in December by a member of the progressive immigrant advocacy group Make the Road Nevada that sought to block the initiative. The high court said the proposal would not amount to an unfunded mandate and was descriptive enough to inform voters of its effect.

FILE - Workers and voters are pictured at a polling place in Las Vegas, June 14, 2022. Supporters of a proposed constitutional amendment that would require voters to show photo identification at the polls have submitted signatures in an effort to get the measure on the 2024 ballot. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)

FILE - Workers and voters are pictured at a polling place in Las Vegas, June 14, 2022. Supporters of a proposed constitutional amendment that would require voters to show photo identification at the polls have submitted signatures in an effort to get the measure on the 2024 ballot. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)

JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — A Mississippi judge has removed one of the attorneys representing retired NFL quarterback Brett Favre in a state civil lawsuit that seeks to recover welfare money that was supposed to help some of the poorest residents in the U.S. but went to projects pushed by wealthy and well-connected people.

Favre is still represented by other lawyers in the case that the Mississippi Department of Human Services filed in 2022 against him and more than three dozen other people, groups and companies.

Hinds County Circuit Judge Faye Peterson wrote Thursday in her removal order that one of Favre's New York-based attorneys, Daniel Koevary, had violated rules for Mississippi civil court procedures by repeatedly demanding hearings “for matters unrelated to and not within the jurisdiction of this Court to resolve." Peterson also wrote that she deemed the behavior "an attempt to manufacture discord.”

The Associated Press sent email messages to Koevary on Friday and Monday asking for his reaction to Peterson's decision.

Mississippi Auditor Shad White said in 2020 that Favre, a Pro Football Hall of Fame member who lives in Mississippi, had improperly received $1.1 million in speaking fees from a nonprofit organization that spent welfare money with approval from the Mississippi Department of Human Services. The welfare money was to go toward a volleyball arena at the University of Southern Mississippi. Favre agreed to lead fundraising efforts for the facility at his alma mater, where his daughter started playing on the volleyball team in 2017.

Favre repaid $500,000 to the state in May 2020 and $600,000 in October 2021, White said in a court filing in February that Favre still owes $729,790 because interest caused growth in the original amount he owed.

Favre is not facing any criminal charges. Former Mississippi Department of Human Services director John Davis and others have pleaded guilty to misspending money from the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program.

White has said more than $77 million of welfare money was misspent from 2016 to 2019, including $160,000 for drug rehab for a former pro wrestler and thousands of dollars for airfare and hotel stays for Davis, who led the Department of Human Services during those years.

FILE - Former NFL football quarterback Brett Favre speaks with reporters prior to his induction to the Mississippi Hall of Fame, Aug. 1, 2015, in Jackson, Miss. A Mississippi judge on Thursday, July 11, 2024, removed one of the attorneys representing Favre in a civil lawsuit filed in 2022 by the Mississippi Department of Human Services, which seeks to recover welfare money that the state auditor says was misspent on projects including a university volleyball arena backed by Favre. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File)

FILE - Former NFL football quarterback Brett Favre speaks with reporters prior to his induction to the Mississippi Hall of Fame, Aug. 1, 2015, in Jackson, Miss. A Mississippi judge on Thursday, July 11, 2024, removed one of the attorneys representing Favre in a civil lawsuit filed in 2022 by the Mississippi Department of Human Services, which seeks to recover welfare money that the state auditor says was misspent on projects including a university volleyball arena backed by Favre. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis, File)

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