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Chinese, Yemeni FMs meet in Beijing

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Chinese, Yemeni FMs meet in Beijing

2024-05-28 17:57 Last Updated At:18:57

Chinese Foreign Minister Wang Yi met and talked with Yemeni Foreign Minister Shaya Mohsin Zindani in Beijing on Tuesday.

The meeting took place ahead of the 10th Ministerial Conference of the China-Arab States Cooperation Forum, which will be held in Beijing on Thursday. Wang, also a member of the Political Bureau of the Communist Party of China Central Committee, said Yemen is one of the earliest Arab countries to establish diplomatic relationship with the People's Republic of China, and China supports Yemen's development and will continue to promote healthy and stable bilateral ties.

Wang reiterated that the current Red Sea tensions are a spillover of the Gaza conflict. He said the urgent task now is to end the fighting and avoid a greater humanitarian disaster.

Wang said China hopes all parties to the Yemeni issue will stick to a political settlement, continue to resolve differences through dialog and negotiation, and strive for an early reconciliation.

Zindani said Yemen supports the one-China principle and appreciates China's support in various respects, including Yemen's socio-economic development.

Chinese, Yemeni FMs meet in Beijing

Chinese, Yemeni FMs meet in Beijing

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China, New Zealand can combine resources, expertise toward better future: professor

2024-06-14 20:59 Last Updated At:21:27

Expansion of services trading between China and New Zealand has the potential to bring benefits to the region and create a more sustainable and peaceful world, said a New Zealand scholar on Friday.

Chinese Premier Li Qiang arrived in New Zealand Thursday for an official visit, the first leg of his three-nation tour from June 13 to 20.

This year marks the 10th anniversary of Chinese President Xi Jinping's state visit to the Pacific country and the establishment of a comprehensive strategic partnership between China and New Zealand.

In an interview with the China Global Television Network (CGTN), Alexander Gillespie, a professor of international law at the University of Waikato in New Zealand, said solid trade ties will contribute to the development of positive bilateral relations.

"I think you need to take a step back because there's a lot of disagreement in the world right now. But what this is showing us is that these two countries can come together and find areas of cooperation, and this is finding an area of common ground where we can both grow and hopefully progressively so in foreseeable future," said Gillespie.

China and New Zealand on Thursday agreed to initiate negotiations on service trade negative lists. The decision was made during a meeting between Chinese Premier Li Qiang and New Zealand Prime Minister Christopher Luxon.

Commenting on negotiations on service trade negative lists, Gillespie said that the two sides have good faith in expanding cooperation with a 21st century approach.

"At the moment, services make up about 10 percent of the total trade that is shared between New Zealand and China. This covers areas like communications, transport, travel in areas that we hope to expand. And what this is telling us is that services in the 21st century will be much more important in trade than traditional goods. And so we're seeing now a willingness to go into new areas that hopefully the two countries can both profit from," he said.

The legal scholar also stressed that stronger cross-culture exchanges help bridge differences and enhance mutual understanding.

"You can see this on two levels. Obviously, there's a large focus right now on reestablishing the strong bonds and education between the two countries and that's a very positive aspect. But to my mind, what this is signaling is the importance of people-to-people exchanges. Because the way for a much more sustainable and peaceful future is not necessarily just in goods and services, but making sure that our two peoples can come and visit each other and learn from each other's cultures and histories," he said.

China, New Zealand can combine resources, expertise toward better future: professor

China, New Zealand can combine resources, expertise toward better future: professor

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