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Drought reduces Vietnam's coffee output

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China

Drought reduces Vietnam's coffee output

2024-06-15 17:40 Last Updated At:20:57

The El-Nino caused high temperatures and reduced rainfall has severely impacted Vietnam's coffee farming and looms to decrease its output drastically this year.

Coffee farmers of the world's second-largest coffee exporter have expanded their planting areas with rising international coffee prices in recent years. But the extreme weather has dealt them a heavy blow.

In Gia Lai Province, a major coffee producer in Vietnam, numerous local farmers are upset by the ongoing drought.

"Because of the drought and little rain this year, the coffee production is likely to drop by about 30 percent from normal years. My coffee plantation usually produces 6 tons of coffee beans each year, sometimes even eight tons. But this year it might be only four to five tons," said Nguyen Van Hoa, a local farmer.

"The coffee output this year could decline by about 40 percent, possibly even more," said Le Duc Nien, another coffee grower.

Currently, local farmers are only able to increase irrigation to mitigate the impact of extreme weather on the coffee production, with little effect. Meteorologists noted that Vietnamese coffee strains are sensitive to temperatures and highly vulnerable to extreme weather conditions.

"Coffee trees are highly sensitive to temperatures. They grow best only at temperatures ranging from 24 to 28 degrees Celsius. When the temperatures go up, the yields will go down, compromising the quality of coffee flowers and beans. And at higher temperatures, pests and diseases are easy to spread," said Truong Ba Kien, a Vietnamese meteorologist.

"Coffee trees in Vietnam are dominantly Robusta, a type of coffee trees that need a lot of water. The scarcity of water and rain in the recent time has severely impacted Vietnam's coffee industry," said Do Xuan Hien, office director of Vietnam Coffee-Cocoa Association (VICOFA).

The drought in Vietnam has also affected the production of peppers, avocados, and durians in Gia Lai.

Drought reduces Vietnam's coffee output

Drought reduces Vietnam's coffee output

Drought reduces Vietnam's coffee output

Drought reduces Vietnam's coffee output

Drought reduces Vietnam's coffee output

Drought reduces Vietnam's coffee output

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Sewing workshop struggles in ruins to mend clothes for displaced Gaza residents

2024-07-19 22:05 Last Updated At:22:57

A sewing workshop has been operating in ruins to mend worn-out clothes for displaced Palestinians in the war-torn Gaza Strip, as Israel's continuous destruction of the enclave has made new clothes a luxury almost impossible to come by or afford.

The UN humanitarian coordinator for Gaza said in early July that a total of 1.9 million people, around 80 percent of the region's population, were displaced.

However, in a room behind demolished walls in the southern Gaza Strip city of Khan Younis, a sewing workshop has quietly been set up, with some workers using sewing machines recovered from a bombed-out tailoring workshop to provide mending services.

"I opened the workshop after I was able to recover the sewing machines and some fabric from the old factory. I work to serve all the displaced people of the Gaza Strip, such as people from the al-Mawasi area in Khan Younis and the Nuseirat [refugee camp]," said Abu Samer Shaat, the workshop owner.

The prolonged and intense Israel-Hamas conflict has forced a great number of Gazan families to flee from one place to another. Due to the continuous destruction of their homes and shelters, all they left were the clothes they wear.

Shops, markets and factories were turned into rubble as a result of the Israeli bombing, and the surviving trading sites in Gaza also suffer a shortage of clothes and fabrics due to Israel's ban on entry of goods and materials.

"Our clothes became loose. We had to take them to tailors to mend them as they had become worn out. There are no new clothes in the market. If there are a few, the prices will be very high, and we will not be able to buy them because we do not have any source of income. Our entire lives have come to a halt," said Hoda Al-Maghari, a displaced Palestinian.

Sewing workshop struggles in ruins to mend clothes for displaced Gaza residents

Sewing workshop struggles in ruins to mend clothes for displaced Gaza residents

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