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Denver Broncos introduce new uniforms for first time since 1997

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Denver Broncos introduce new uniforms for first time since 1997
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Denver Broncos introduce new uniforms for first time since 1997

2024-04-23 08:54 Last Updated At:19:31

DENVER (AP) — The Denver Broncos unveiled new uniforms Monday with their first major changes since 1997. The “ Mile High Collection ” maintains the current helmet logo and features a total of 10 uniform combinations, four jerseys and three helmets.

The collection integrates elements of Colorado's landscapes, features a new dark blue helmet — a color the team calls “metallic satin” — and introduces a throwback orange uniform that includes the legacy blue “D” helmet, paying tribute to the Orange Crush era and the Broncos' first Super Bowl appearance in 1977.

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New uniforms that the Denver Broncos NFL football team will wear starting in the upcoming season hang on display in the team store before a news conference at Empower Field at Mile High, Monday, April 22, 2024, in Denver. The update is the first major change to the team's uniforms since 1997. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

DENVER (AP) — The Denver Broncos unveiled new uniforms Monday with their first major changes since 1997. The “ Mile High Collection ” maintains the current helmet logo and features a total of 10 uniform combinations, four jerseys and three helmets.

Denver Broncos president Damani Leech stands amid the four new uniforms that the NFL football team will wear starting in the upcoming season during a news conference at Empower Field at Mile High, Monday, April 22, 2024, in Denver. The update is the first major change to the team's uniforms since 1997. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Denver Broncos president Damani Leech stands amid the four new uniforms that the NFL football team will wear starting in the upcoming season during a news conference at Empower Field at Mile High, Monday, April 22, 2024, in Denver. The update is the first major change to the team's uniforms since 1997. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Denver Broncos president Damani Leech stands amid the four new uniforms that the NFL football team will wear starting in the upcoming season during a news conference at Empower Field at Mile High, Monday, April 22, 2024, in Denver. The update is the first major change to the team's uniforms since 1997. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Denver Broncos president Damani Leech stands amid the four new uniforms that the NFL football team will wear starting in the upcoming season during a news conference at Empower Field at Mile High, Monday, April 22, 2024, in Denver. The update is the first major change to the team's uniforms since 1997. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Denver Broncos president Damani Leech stands next to two of the four new uniforms that the NFL football team will wear starting in the upcoming season during a news conference at Empower Field at Mile High, Monday, April 22, 2024, in Denver. The update is the first major change to the team's uniforms since 1997. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Denver Broncos president Damani Leech stands next to two of the four new uniforms that the NFL football team will wear starting in the upcoming season during a news conference at Empower Field at Mile High, Monday, April 22, 2024, in Denver. The update is the first major change to the team's uniforms since 1997. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

An employee looks at two of the four new uniforms that the Denver Broncos NFL football team will wear starting in the upcoming season during a news conference at Empower Field at Mile High, Monday, April 22, 2024, in Denver. The update is the first major change to the team's uniforms since 1997. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

An employee looks at two of the four new uniforms that the Denver Broncos NFL football team will wear starting in the upcoming season during a news conference at Empower Field at Mile High, Monday, April 22, 2024, in Denver. The update is the first major change to the team's uniforms since 1997. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Denver Broncos senior director of executive operations Zohere Tabrez, center, stands amid the four new uniforms that the football team will wear starting in the upcoming season during a news conference at Empower Field at Mile High, Monday, April 22, 2024, in Denver. The update is the first major change to the team's uniforms since 1997. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Denver Broncos senior director of executive operations Zohere Tabrez, center, stands amid the four new uniforms that the football team will wear starting in the upcoming season during a news conference at Empower Field at Mile High, Monday, April 22, 2024, in Denver. The update is the first major change to the team's uniforms since 1997. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Two of the four new uniforms that the Denver Broncos NFL football team will wear starting in the upcoming season are on display during a news conference at Empower Field at Mile High, Monday, April 22, 2024, in Denver. The update is the first major change to the team's uniforms since 1997. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Two of the four new uniforms that the Denver Broncos NFL football team will wear starting in the upcoming season are on display during a news conference at Empower Field at Mile High, Monday, April 22, 2024, in Denver. The update is the first major change to the team's uniforms since 1997. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

The number 5280 to mark the elevation of the city of Denver is displayed on the bumper of one of the helmets to go with the four new uniforms that the Denver Broncos NFL football team will wear starting in the upcoming season during a news conference at Empower Field at Mile High, Monday, April 22, 2024, in Denver. The update is the first major change to the team's uniforms since 1997. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

The number 5280 to mark the elevation of the city of Denver is displayed on the bumper of one of the helmets to go with the four new uniforms that the Denver Broncos NFL football team will wear starting in the upcoming season during a news conference at Empower Field at Mile High, Monday, April 22, 2024, in Denver. The update is the first major change to the team's uniforms since 1997. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Former linebacker Randy Gradishar will become the first member of the Orange Crush enshrined in Canton when he's inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame in July.

Gradishar was featured in a video alongside star cornerback Patrick Surtain II introducing the collection.

The rest of the collection uses the Broncos' current helmet logo and colors — sunset orange (home), summit white (away) and midnight navy (alternate) — along with metallic satin helmets in navy for both home and away games and white (alternate).

“As we honor the championship tradition of the Broncos, we’re also committed to innovation and growth during such a transformative time in franchise history,” team president Damani Leech said. “Our new uniforms — the Mile High Collection — boldly integrate elements of our past, present and future while paying tribute to Colorado and the Rocky Mountain Region we proudly call home.”

After getting feedback from more than 10,000 fans, team co-owner Carre Walton Penner led a contingent that included Leech and chief marketing officer Hailey Sullivan to Nike headquarters in Beaverton, Oregon, to meet with designers.

Among the changes:

— The front helmet bumpers display an orange “5280” to mark Denver’s mile-high elevation.

— The font featured on the back nameplates is a nod to national parks signage located around Colorado.

— The outer neck tag is now a triangle label inspired by the iconography of summit markers found throughout the Rocky Mountain region. The inner neck tag has “Broncos Country” emblazoned across the back along with “5280” embroidered vertically.

AP NFL: https://apnews.com/hub/nfl

New uniforms that the Denver Broncos NFL football team will wear starting in the upcoming season hang on display in the team store before a news conference at Empower Field at Mile High, Monday, April 22, 2024, in Denver. The update is the first major change to the team's uniforms since 1997. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

New uniforms that the Denver Broncos NFL football team will wear starting in the upcoming season hang on display in the team store before a news conference at Empower Field at Mile High, Monday, April 22, 2024, in Denver. The update is the first major change to the team's uniforms since 1997. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Denver Broncos president Damani Leech stands amid the four new uniforms that the NFL football team will wear starting in the upcoming season during a news conference at Empower Field at Mile High, Monday, April 22, 2024, in Denver. The update is the first major change to the team's uniforms since 1997. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Denver Broncos president Damani Leech stands amid the four new uniforms that the NFL football team will wear starting in the upcoming season during a news conference at Empower Field at Mile High, Monday, April 22, 2024, in Denver. The update is the first major change to the team's uniforms since 1997. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Denver Broncos president Damani Leech stands amid the four new uniforms that the NFL football team will wear starting in the upcoming season during a news conference at Empower Field at Mile High, Monday, April 22, 2024, in Denver. The update is the first major change to the team's uniforms since 1997. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Denver Broncos president Damani Leech stands amid the four new uniforms that the NFL football team will wear starting in the upcoming season during a news conference at Empower Field at Mile High, Monday, April 22, 2024, in Denver. The update is the first major change to the team's uniforms since 1997. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Denver Broncos president Damani Leech stands next to two of the four new uniforms that the NFL football team will wear starting in the upcoming season during a news conference at Empower Field at Mile High, Monday, April 22, 2024, in Denver. The update is the first major change to the team's uniforms since 1997. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Denver Broncos president Damani Leech stands next to two of the four new uniforms that the NFL football team will wear starting in the upcoming season during a news conference at Empower Field at Mile High, Monday, April 22, 2024, in Denver. The update is the first major change to the team's uniforms since 1997. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

An employee looks at two of the four new uniforms that the Denver Broncos NFL football team will wear starting in the upcoming season during a news conference at Empower Field at Mile High, Monday, April 22, 2024, in Denver. The update is the first major change to the team's uniforms since 1997. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

An employee looks at two of the four new uniforms that the Denver Broncos NFL football team will wear starting in the upcoming season during a news conference at Empower Field at Mile High, Monday, April 22, 2024, in Denver. The update is the first major change to the team's uniforms since 1997. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Denver Broncos senior director of executive operations Zohere Tabrez, center, stands amid the four new uniforms that the football team will wear starting in the upcoming season during a news conference at Empower Field at Mile High, Monday, April 22, 2024, in Denver. The update is the first major change to the team's uniforms since 1997. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Denver Broncos senior director of executive operations Zohere Tabrez, center, stands amid the four new uniforms that the football team will wear starting in the upcoming season during a news conference at Empower Field at Mile High, Monday, April 22, 2024, in Denver. The update is the first major change to the team's uniforms since 1997. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Two of the four new uniforms that the Denver Broncos NFL football team will wear starting in the upcoming season are on display during a news conference at Empower Field at Mile High, Monday, April 22, 2024, in Denver. The update is the first major change to the team's uniforms since 1997. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

Two of the four new uniforms that the Denver Broncos NFL football team will wear starting in the upcoming season are on display during a news conference at Empower Field at Mile High, Monday, April 22, 2024, in Denver. The update is the first major change to the team's uniforms since 1997. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

The number 5280 to mark the elevation of the city of Denver is displayed on the bumper of one of the helmets to go with the four new uniforms that the Denver Broncos NFL football team will wear starting in the upcoming season during a news conference at Empower Field at Mile High, Monday, April 22, 2024, in Denver. The update is the first major change to the team's uniforms since 1997. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

The number 5280 to mark the elevation of the city of Denver is displayed on the bumper of one of the helmets to go with the four new uniforms that the Denver Broncos NFL football team will wear starting in the upcoming season during a news conference at Empower Field at Mile High, Monday, April 22, 2024, in Denver. The update is the first major change to the team's uniforms since 1997. (AP Photo/David Zalubowski)

THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — The top United Nations court ordered Israel on Friday to immediately halt its military offensive in the southern Gaza city of Rafah, but stopped short of ordering a cease-fire for the enclave. Although Israel is unlikely to comply with the order, it will ratchet up the pressure on the increasingly isolated country.

Criticism of Israel's conduct in the war in Gaza has been growing, particularly since it turned its focus to Rafah. This week alone, three European countries announced they would recognize a Palestinian state, and the chief prosecutor for another international court requested arrest warrants for Israeli leaders, along with Hamas officials.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is also under some pressure at home to end the war, which was triggered when Hamas-led militants stormed into Israel, killing 1,200 people, most civilians, and taking some 250 hostage. Thousands of Israelis have joined weekly demonstrations calling on the government to reach a deal to bring the hostages home, fearing time is running out.

Although the ruling by the International Court of Justice is a blow to Israel's international standing, the court doesn't have a police force to enforce its orders. In another case on its docket, Russia has ignored the court's 2022 order to halt its full-scale invasion of Ukraine.

The sharply focused decision sent a clear, three-pronged message to Israel, ordering a halt to the Rafah offensive, access to Gaza for war crimes investigators, and a big and immediate increase of humanitarian aid to the region, parts of which are enduring famine.

“This legally binding and very specific ruling leaves Israel with very little wiggle room,” said Reed Brody, a veteran human rights lawyer and prosecutor.

Benny Gantz, a popular centrist member of the war cabinet, appeared to indicate that Israel would not change its course regarding Rafah.

“The State of Israel is committed to continue fighting to return its hostages and promise the security of its citizens — wherever and whenever necessary — including in Rafah,” he said.

"We will continue operating in accordance with international law wherever we might operate, while safeguarding to the best extent possible the civilian population. Not because of the ICJ, but because of who we are and the values we stand for.”

Immediately after the ruling, Netanyahu announced that he would hold a special ministerial meeting to decide how to respond. Yair Lapid, the leader of the opposition, derided the decision.

“The fact that the ICJ did not even directly connect the end of the military operation in Rafah to the release of the hostages and to Israel’s right to defend itself against terror is an abject moral failure,” he said.

Balkees Jarrah, associate international justice director at Human Rights Watch, said the court’s order underscored the perilous situation of Palestinians in Gaza, but warned that it could be ignored if the international community doesn't use whatever leverage it can on Israel.

“The ICJ’s decision opens up the possibility for relief, but only if governments use their leverage, including through arms embargoes and targeted sanctions, to press Israel to urgently enforce the court’s measures,” Jarrah said.

The court’s president, Nawaf Salam, read out the ruling as a small group of pro-Palestinian protesters demonstrated outside.

Fears the court expressed earlier this year about an operation in Rafah have “materialized,” the ruling said, and Israel must “immediately halt its military offensive” in the city and anything else that might result in conditions that could cause the “physical destruction in whole or in part” of Palestinians there.

Rafah is in the southernmost part of the Gaza Strip, on the border with Egypt, and over 1 million people sought refuge there in recent months after fleeing fighting elsewhere, with many of them living in teeming tent camps. Israel has been vowing for months to invade Rafah, saying it was Hamas’ last major stronghold, even as several allies warned that an all-out assault would spell disaster.

Israel started issuing evacuation orders about two weeks ago as it began operations on the edge of the city. Since then, the army says an estimated 1 million people have left as forces press deeper inside.

Rafah is also home to a critical crossing for aid, and the U.N. says the flow of aid reaching it has plunged since the incursion began, though commercial trucking has continued to enter Gaza.

The court ordered Israel to keep the Rafah crossing open, saying "the humanitarian situation is now to be characterized as disastrous.”

But it did not call for a full cease-fire throughout Gaza, as South Africa, which has historic ties to the Palestinian people and brought the case, requested last week.

South Africa's foreign minister, Naledi Pandor, said the country's allegation that a genocide is underway is getting “stronger and stronger by the day.”

“We are really pleased that the court has given very serious consideration to the matters that we put before it and has affirmed that an urgent decision is needed from the court to pause this onslaught against innocent Palestinian people,” she told South African state broadcaster SABC, adding that it's now up to the U.N. Security Council to determine how to protect the Palestinians.

The cease-fire request is part of a case accusing Israel of committing genocide during its Gaza campaign. Israel vehemently denies the allegations. The case will take years to resolve, but South Africa wants interim orders to protect Palestinians while the legal wrangling continues.

The court ruled Friday that Israel must ensure access for any fact-finding or investigative mission sent by the U.N. to investigate the genocide allegations.

At public hearings last week at the International Court of Justice, South Africa's ambassador to the Netherlands, Vusimuzi Madonsela, urged the panel of 15 international judges to order Israel to “totally and unconditionally withdraw” from the Gaza Strip.

The court has already found that Israel's military operations pose a “real and imminent risk” to the Palestinian people.

Israel’s offensive has killed more than 35,000 Palestinians, according to Gaza’s Health Ministry, which doesn't distinguish between combatants and civilians. The operation has obliterated entire neighborhoods, sent hundreds of thousands of people fleeing their homes, and pushed parts of the territory into famine.

“This may well be the last chance for the court to act,” Irish lawyer Blinne Ní Ghrálaigh, who is part of South Africa’s legal team, told judges last week.

In January, ICJ judges ordered Israel to do all it could to prevent death, destruction and any acts of genocide in Gaza, but the panel stopped short of ordering an end to the military offensive. In a second order in March, the court said Israel must take measures to improve the humanitarian situation.

The ICJ rules in disputes between nations. A few kilometers (miles) away, the International Criminal Court files charges against individuals it considers most responsible for war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide.

On Monday, the ICC's chief prosecutor, Karim Khan, said he has asked ICC judges to approve arrest warrants for Netanyahu, Defense Minister Yoav Gallant and three top Hamas leaders — Yahya Sinwar, Mohammed Deif and Ismail Haniyeh — of war crimes and crimes against humanity in the Gaza Strip and Israel.

Israel is not an ICC member, so even if the arrest warrants are issued, Netanyahu and Gallant do not face any immediate risk of prosecution. But the threat of arrest could make it difficult for the Israeli leaders to travel abroad.

Rights lawyer Brody said the that ICJ decision together with the ICC prosecutor's request for warrants "are a 1-2 legal punch to the conduct of Israel’s war in Gaza.”

This story was updated to correct that the International Criminal Court is not a U.N. court.

Find more AP coverage at https://apnews.com/hub/israel-hamas-war

Ambassador of the Republic of South Africa to the Netherlands, Vusimuzi Madonsela, wait for judges to enter the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday, May 24, 2024, where the top United Nations court was to rule on an urgent plea by South Africa for judges to order Israel to halt its military operations in Gaza and withdraw from the enclave. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

Ambassador of the Republic of South Africa to the Netherlands, Vusimuzi Madonsela, wait for judges to enter the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday, May 24, 2024, where the top United Nations court was to rule on an urgent plea by South Africa for judges to order Israel to halt its military operations in Gaza and withdraw from the enclave. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

Israel legal team, with Yaron Wax, Malcolm Shaw and Avigail Frisch Ben Avraham, from left, wait for judges to enter the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday, May 24, 2024, where the top United Nations court was to rule on an urgent plea by South Africa for judges to order Israel to halt its military operations in Gaza and withdraw from the enclave. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

Israel legal team, with Yaron Wax, Malcolm Shaw and Avigail Frisch Ben Avraham, from left, wait for judges to enter the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday, May 24, 2024, where the top United Nations court was to rule on an urgent plea by South Africa for judges to order Israel to halt its military operations in Gaza and withdraw from the enclave. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

Journalists take images of Israel's legal team, with Yaron Wax, Malcolm Shaw and Avigail Frisch Ben Avraham, from left, before Judges enter the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday, May 24, 2024, where the top United Nations court ordered Israel on Friday to immediately halt its military operations in the southern Gaza city of Rafah. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

Journalists take images of Israel's legal team, with Yaron Wax, Malcolm Shaw and Avigail Frisch Ben Avraham, from left, before Judges enter the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday, May 24, 2024, where the top United Nations court ordered Israel on Friday to immediately halt its military operations in the southern Gaza city of Rafah. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

Journalists take images of Israel legal team before Judges enter the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday, May 24, 2024, where the top United Nations court ruled on an urgent plea by South Africa for judges to order Israel to halt its military operations in Gaza and withdraw from the enclave. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

Journalists take images of Israel legal team before Judges enter the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday, May 24, 2024, where the top United Nations court ruled on an urgent plea by South Africa for judges to order Israel to halt its military operations in Gaza and withdraw from the enclave. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

Journalists took images of South Africa's legal team, with Ambassador of the Republic of South Africa to the Netherlands, Vusimuzi Madonsela, right, as they waited for judges to enter the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday, May 24, 2024, where the top United Nations court was to rule on an urgent plea by South Africa for judges to order Israel to halt its military operations in Gaza and withdraw from the enclave. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

Journalists took images of South Africa's legal team, with Ambassador of the Republic of South Africa to the Netherlands, Vusimuzi Madonsela, right, as they waited for judges to enter the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday, May 24, 2024, where the top United Nations court was to rule on an urgent plea by South Africa for judges to order Israel to halt its military operations in Gaza and withdraw from the enclave. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

Presiding Judge Nawaf Salam reads the ruling of the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday, May 24, 2024, where the top United Nations court ruled on an urgent plea by South Africa for judges to order Israel to halt its military operations in Gaza and withdraw from the enclave. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

Presiding Judge Nawaf Salam reads the ruling of the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday, May 24, 2024, where the top United Nations court ruled on an urgent plea by South Africa for judges to order Israel to halt its military operations in Gaza and withdraw from the enclave. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

A lone demonstrator holds Palestinian flag outside the Peace Palace, background, housing the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday, May 24, 2024. The top United Nations court was to rule on an urgent plea by South Africa for judges to order Israel to halt its military operations in Gaza and withdraw from the enclave. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

A lone demonstrator holds Palestinian flag outside the Peace Palace, background, housing the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday, May 24, 2024. The top United Nations court was to rule on an urgent plea by South Africa for judges to order Israel to halt its military operations in Gaza and withdraw from the enclave. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

A lone demonstrator waves the Palestinian flag outside the Peace Palace, rear, housing the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday, May 24, 2024. The top United Nations court was to rule on an urgent plea by South Africa for judges to order Israel to halt its military operations in Gaza and withdraw from the enclave. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

A lone demonstrator waves the Palestinian flag outside the Peace Palace, rear, housing the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday, May 24, 2024. The top United Nations court was to rule on an urgent plea by South Africa for judges to order Israel to halt its military operations in Gaza and withdraw from the enclave. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

A lone demonstrator waves the Palestinian flag outside the Peace Palace, rear, housing the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday, May 24, 2024. The top United Nations court was to rule on an urgent plea by South Africa for judges to order Israel to halt its military operations in Gaza and withdraw from the enclave. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

A lone demonstrator waves the Palestinian flag outside the Peace Palace, rear, housing the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday, May 24, 2024. The top United Nations court was to rule on an urgent plea by South Africa for judges to order Israel to halt its military operations in Gaza and withdraw from the enclave. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

Placards reading "Nobody is Free till Palestine is Free" were laid out for demonstrators outside the Peace Palace, rear, housing the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday, May 24, 2024. The top United Nations court was to rule on an urgent plea by South Africa for judges to order Israel to halt its military operations in Gaza and withdraw from the enclave. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

Placards reading "Nobody is Free till Palestine is Free" were laid out for demonstrators outside the Peace Palace, rear, housing the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday, May 24, 2024. The top United Nations court was to rule on an urgent plea by South Africa for judges to order Israel to halt its military operations in Gaza and withdraw from the enclave. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

Judges enter the International Court of Justice, in The Hague, Netherlands, Thursday, May 16, 2024. The U.N.'s top court opened two days of hearings in a case brought by South Africa to see whether Israel needs to take additional measures to alleviate the suffering in war-ravaged Gaza. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

Judges enter the International Court of Justice, in The Hague, Netherlands, Thursday, May 16, 2024. The U.N.'s top court opened two days of hearings in a case brought by South Africa to see whether Israel needs to take additional measures to alleviate the suffering in war-ravaged Gaza. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

Exterior view of the Peace Palace, office of the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Thursday, May 16, 2024. The U.N.'s top court opened two days of hearings in a case brought by South Africa to see whether Israel needs to take additional measures to alleviate the suffering in war-ravaged Gaza. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

Exterior view of the Peace Palace, office of the International Court of Justice, or World Court, in The Hague, Netherlands, Thursday, May 16, 2024. The U.N.'s top court opened two days of hearings in a case brought by South Africa to see whether Israel needs to take additional measures to alleviate the suffering in war-ravaged Gaza. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

A Peace Sign is laid out with flowers outside the Peace Palace, office of the International Court of Justice, in The Hague, Netherlands, Thursday, May 16, 2024. The U.N.'s top court opened two days of hearings in a case brought by South Africa to see whether Israel needs to take additional measures to alleviate the suffering in war-ravaged Gaza. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

A Peace Sign is laid out with flowers outside the Peace Palace, office of the International Court of Justice, in The Hague, Netherlands, Thursday, May 16, 2024. The U.N.'s top court opened two days of hearings in a case brought by South Africa to see whether Israel needs to take additional measures to alleviate the suffering in war-ravaged Gaza. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

The top UN court is set to rule on a request for it to order Israel to halt its offensive in Gaza

The top UN court is set to rule on a request for it to order Israel to halt its offensive in Gaza

Front row from left, South Africa's agents Cornelius Scholtz, Vusimuzi Madonsela and Israel's agents Gilad Naom, Tamar Kaplan Tourgeman and co-agent Avigail Frisch Ben Avraham wait for the start of hearings at the International Court of Justice, in The Hague, Netherlands, Thursday, May 16, 2024. The U.N.'s top court opened two days of hearings in a case brought by South Africa to see whether Israel needs to take additional measures to alleviate the suffering in war-ravaged Gaza. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

Front row from left, South Africa's agents Cornelius Scholtz, Vusimuzi Madonsela and Israel's agents Gilad Naom, Tamar Kaplan Tourgeman and co-agent Avigail Frisch Ben Avraham wait for the start of hearings at the International Court of Justice, in The Hague, Netherlands, Thursday, May 16, 2024. The U.N.'s top court opened two days of hearings in a case brought by South Africa to see whether Israel needs to take additional measures to alleviate the suffering in war-ravaged Gaza. (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

The top UN court is set to rule on a request for it to order Israel to halt its offensive in Gaza

The top UN court is set to rule on a request for it to order Israel to halt its offensive in Gaza

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