Skip to Content Facebook Feature Image

Nelly Korda stumbles again in 1st event since US Women's Open, shooting 76 in Meijer LPGA Classic

News

Nelly Korda stumbles again in 1st event since US Women's Open, shooting 76 in Meijer LPGA Classic
News

News

Nelly Korda stumbles again in 1st event since US Women's Open, shooting 76 in Meijer LPGA Classic

2024-06-14 12:25 Last Updated At:12:30

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (AP) — Nelly Korda stumbled again Thursday in her first event since missing the cut in the U.S. Women's Open, dropping four strokes on the first three holes in a 4-over 76 at the windy Meijer LPGA Classic.

The top-ranked Korda was tied for 133rd in the 144-player field, 11 strokes behind leader Alison Lee at Blythefield Country Club.

More Images
Jiwon Jeon of Korea tees off on the fourth hole during the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (AP) — Nelly Korda stumbled again Thursday in her first event since missing the cut in the U.S. Women's Open, dropping four strokes on the first three holes in a 4-over 76 at the windy Meijer LPGA Classic.

Isabella Fierro, of Mexico, watches her tee shot on the fourth hole during the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

Isabella Fierro, of Mexico, watches her tee shot on the fourth hole during the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

Leona Maguire tees off on the fourth hole during the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

Leona Maguire tees off on the fourth hole during the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

Alena Sharp, of Canada, tees off on the third hole during the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

Alena Sharp, of Canada, tees off on the third hole during the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

Leona Maguire, of Ireland, tees off on the third hole during the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

Leona Maguire, of Ireland, tees off on the third hole during the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

Brooke M. Henderson, of Canada, tees off on the first hole during the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

Brooke M. Henderson, of Canada, tees off on the first hole during the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

Alison Lee, left, and Lilia Vu embrace after finishing the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

Alison Lee, left, and Lilia Vu embrace after finishing the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

Nelly Korda hits out of a bunker on the first hole during the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

Nelly Korda hits out of a bunker on the first hole during the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

Nelly Korda chips onto the third green during the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

Nelly Korda chips onto the third green during the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

Korda shot 80-70 — making a 10 on a hole in the first round — two weeks ago in the U.S. Women’s Open in Pennsylvania. She came into the Women's Open with six victories in her last seven tournaments, including a major that tied an LPGA Tour record for five wins in a row.

On Thursday at Blythefield, where she won in 2021 at a tournament-record 25 under, Korda opened double bogey-bogey-bogey. Playing in the afternoon in a group with fellow past champions Brooke Henderson and Leona Maguire, Korda was even par the rest of the way, offsetting three bogeys with three birdies.

Lee shot 65. Winless on the tour, she eagled the par-5 eighth and had seven birdies and a bogey.

“Definitely really nice to shoot a low one today,” Lee said. “Definitely giving a lot of credit to my putter. Even I made a lot of really, really good par saves, and a lot of good birdies.”

Henderson, the Canadian who the event in 2017 and 2019, was two strokes back at 67 with 2022 champion Jennifer Kupcho, Lizette Salas, Benedetta Moresco, Narin An, Carlota Ciganda, Ssu-Chia Cheng, Lauren Hartlage and Daniela Darquea.

“It was extremely windy,” Henderson said. “It was really tough to judge. I feel like the first few holes I didn’t hit a fairway and was really getting up-and-down, made a lot clutch par saves, which really kept the momentum and the round going.”

Lilia Vu, a former No. 1 player and double major winner last year, opened with a 69 — playing alongside Lee — in her return from a back injury that sidelined her since the Ford Championship in Arizona at the end of March.

“Played with my good friend Alison,” Vu said. “It was fun. She played really well, so kept me in check.”

Lexi Thompson, the 2015 winner, shot 71. She has gone more than five years without winning. Thompson has said this will be her last year playing a full schedule.

Defending champion Maguire eagled the par-5 18th for a 72.

AP golf: https://apnews.com/hub/golf

Jiwon Jeon of Korea tees off on the fourth hole during the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

Jiwon Jeon of Korea tees off on the fourth hole during the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

Isabella Fierro, of Mexico, watches her tee shot on the fourth hole during the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

Isabella Fierro, of Mexico, watches her tee shot on the fourth hole during the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

Leona Maguire tees off on the fourth hole during the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

Leona Maguire tees off on the fourth hole during the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

Alena Sharp, of Canada, tees off on the third hole during the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

Alena Sharp, of Canada, tees off on the third hole during the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

Leona Maguire, of Ireland, tees off on the third hole during the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

Leona Maguire, of Ireland, tees off on the third hole during the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

Brooke M. Henderson, of Canada, tees off on the first hole during the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

Brooke M. Henderson, of Canada, tees off on the first hole during the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

Alison Lee, left, and Lilia Vu embrace after finishing the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

Alison Lee, left, and Lilia Vu embrace after finishing the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

Nelly Korda hits out of a bunker on the first hole during the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

Nelly Korda hits out of a bunker on the first hole during the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

Nelly Korda chips onto the third green during the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

Nelly Korda chips onto the third green during the first round of the Meijer LPGA Classic golf tournament, Thursday, June 13, 2024, in Belmont, Mich. (AP Photo/Al Goldis)

NEW YORK (AP) — The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau said Thursday that apps that allow workers to access their paychecks in advance, often for a fee, are providing loans and therefore subject to the Truth in Lending Act.

If enacted, the proposed rule would provide clarity to a fast-growing industry known as Earned Wage Access, which has been compared to payday lending. The agency wants borrowers to be able to “easily compare products” and to prevent “race-to-the-bottom business practices,” CFPB Director Rohit Chopra said on a call with reporters.

Earned Wage Access apps have been around for more than a decade, but they gained popularity in the years prior to the pandemic and since. The apps extend small short-term loans to workers in between paychecks so they can pay bills and meet everyday needs. On payday, the user repays the money out of their wages, along with any fees. Between 2018 and 2020, transaction volume tripled from $3.2 billion to $9.5 billion, according to Datos Insights.

The CFPB said their research shows the average worker who uses Earned Wage Access takes out 27 of these loans a year, meaning one loan for almost every biweekly paycheck. This can look similar to a revolving credit card balance. But with fees that would equal an average Annual Percentage Rate (APR) of over 100%, the loans have interest rates higher than the most expensive subprime credit card. Most of this interest comes from fees to expedite access to paychecks, the CFPB found.

The typical user of these apps earns also less than $50,000 a year, according to the Government Accountability Office, and has experienced the pinch of two years of high inflation. Many of the apps charge monthly subscription fees and most charge mandatory fees for instant transfers of funds.

Christine Zinner, policy counsel at Americans for Financial Reform, said the paycheck advance products “are nothing more than workplace payday loans, with consumers (being) more easily preyed upon since the money is only a tap away on a cell phone.”

“People can easily become trapped in a cycle of debt by re-borrowing, requesting advances 12 to 120 times each year, just to pay basic household expenses and make ends meet,” she said.

The CFPB also said it is paying close attention to the “tips” many of the apps request when providing advances on paychecks. On the call, Chopra called the practice odd, noting that many paycheck advance companies bring in “substantial revenues” from the so-called tips.

In 2021, the California Department of Financial Protection and Innovation found “users often feel compelled to leave (tips) due to applied pressure tactics like... claiming tips are used to support other vulnerable consumers or for charitable purposes.”

With the interpretive rule, the CFPB is clarifying that “if workers obtain money they are required to repay out of their paychecks, this is a loan under federal law, (and the companies) must disclose an interest rate.”

This means that tips and fees for expedited transfers must be incorporated into the cost of the loan, under the disclosure scheme mandated by the Truth in Lending Act, and those costs may not be treated as “incidental, even if the amount is variable,” Chopra said.

Some Earned Wage Access companies have argued these fees should not be treated as part of the standard APR calculation on the loans. When Connecticut passed a law capping the fees the apps could charge under its state usury limits, at least one Earned Wage Access company, EarnIn, stopped operating in the state. Asked why, EarnIn CEO Ram Palaniappan said it was no longer “economically viable.”

The agency will take comments on the proposed interpretive rule until the end of August.

“Today’s report and rule are important steps for the CFPB to ensure the market is working,” Chopra said. “We want to see the market compete down costs for employees and employers.”

The Associated Press receives support from Charles Schwab Foundation for educational and explanatory reporting to improve financial literacy. The independent foundation is separate from Charles Schwab and Co. Inc. The AP is solely responsible for its journalism.

FILE - Rohit Chopra, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, speaks as President Joe Biden meets with his Competition Council to announce new actions to lower costs for families in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, on March 5, 2024. The CFPB said Thursday July 18, 2024 that apps that allow workers to access their paychecks in advance, often for a fee, are providing loans and should be subject to the Truth in Lending Act. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

FILE - Rohit Chopra, director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, speaks as President Joe Biden meets with his Competition Council to announce new actions to lower costs for families in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, on March 5, 2024. The CFPB said Thursday July 18, 2024 that apps that allow workers to access their paychecks in advance, often for a fee, are providing loans and should be subject to the Truth in Lending Act. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

Recommended Articles