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Roenick gets into Hockey Hall of Fame after a lengthy wait. 2024 class includes 2 US women's players

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Roenick gets into Hockey Hall of Fame after a lengthy wait. 2024 class includes 2 US women's players
Sport

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Roenick gets into Hockey Hall of Fame after a lengthy wait. 2024 class includes 2 US women's players

2024-06-26 06:07 Last Updated At:06:11

Jeremy Roenick was getting a coffee when he got the call he once hoped for but some time ago stopped expecting when the Hockey Hall of Fame selection committee meets typically in late June.

Tears welled up in his eyes and then down his face as he was rendered unable to pay, to hold the cup or to speak. It was to him an embarrassing but also a wonderful moment to get the word that he'll be inducted into the hall this November.

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FILE - Olympic medalist Krissy Wendell speaks with members of the media before being inducted into the U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame, Thursday, Dec. 12, 2019, in Washington. Wendell is part of the Hall of Fame class of 2024. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

Jeremy Roenick was getting a coffee when he got the call he once hoped for but some time ago stopped expecting when the Hockey Hall of Fame selection committee meets typically in late June.

FILE - Russian forward Pavel Datsyuk is in action during the exhibition ice hockey game between Russia and Belarus in Moscow, Russia, Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018. Datsyuk is part of the Hall of Fame class of 2024. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko, File)

FILE - Russian forward Pavel Datsyuk is in action during the exhibition ice hockey game between Russia and Belarus in Moscow, Russia, Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018. Datsyuk is part of the Hall of Fame class of 2024. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko, File)

FILE - Montreal Canadiens' Shea Weber (6) celebrates his goal during the first period in Game 6 of an NHL hockey Stanley Cup semifinal playoff series against the Vegas Golden Knights Thursday, June 24, 2021 in Montreal. Weber is park of the Hall of Fame class of 2024. (Paul Chiasson/The Canadian Press via AP, File)

FILE - Montreal Canadiens' Shea Weber (6) celebrates his goal during the first period in Game 6 of an NHL hockey Stanley Cup semifinal playoff series against the Vegas Golden Knights Thursday, June 24, 2021 in Montreal. Weber is park of the Hall of Fame class of 2024. (Paul Chiasson/The Canadian Press via AP, File)

FILE - Natalie Darwitz of the USA women's ice hockey is seen during a press conference in Vancouver, British Columbia, Thursday, Feb. 11, 2010. Darwitz is part of the Hall of Fame class of 2024. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)

FILE - Natalie Darwitz of the USA women's ice hockey is seen during a press conference in Vancouver, British Columbia, Thursday, Feb. 11, 2010. Darwitz is part of the Hall of Fame class of 2024. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)

FILE - Former Chicago Blackhawks player Jeremy Roenick acknowledges the crowd after being honored before an NHL hockey game between the Vancouver Canucks and the Blackhawks, Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017, in Chicago. Roenick has been elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame after being eligible for more than a decade. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

FILE - Former Chicago Blackhawks player Jeremy Roenick acknowledges the crowd after being honored before an NHL hockey game between the Vancouver Canucks and the Blackhawks, Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017, in Chicago. Roenick has been elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame after being eligible for more than a decade. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

“I still can’t believe it,” Roenick said. “I’m sitting here in shock. I’m shaking. I’m sweating. ... This means the world to me.”

His lengthy wait is over after more than a decade, as Roenick was unveiled Tuesday as part of the seven-member class of 2024, the first to include two women’s players since 2010. It’s the first class with two U.S. women’s players in the hall’s history: Natalie Darwitz and Krissy Wendell-Pohl.

“Hopefully this is a regular occurrence from here on out,” Darwitz said. “There’s so many players of our generation and past generations that have paved the way to get women’s hockey to be where it is today, so hopefully we’re the starting line of that happening every single year, that two female hockey players can get into the Hall of Fame.”

Two-time Detroit Red Wings Stanley Cup-winning winger Pavel Datsyuk and former Nashville Predators defenseman Shea Weber were elected in their first year of eligibility. Longtime executives Colin Campbell and David Poile were chosen in the builder category.

Roenick’s 1,216 points with Chicago, Phoenix, Philadelphia, Los Angeles and San Jose are fourth most of any U.S.-born player. He has been a candidate since 2012 and passed over each year since.

"I actually did not think it was going to happen," Roenick said on a conference call with reporters. “Having something when you wait for it, and like I waited for it, never knowing if it would happen, it feels like it means more because it hit me really, really hard.”

Datsyuk and Weber were slam dunks to be first-ballot Hall of Famers. Datsyuk dazzled as “the Magic Man” throughout a 14-year career with Detroit in which he excelled offensively and defensively and afterward won also won Olympic gold with Russia in 2018 when NHL players did not participate.

“Of course I’m pumped,” Datsyuk said. “Now I’m a lucky boy. I’m happy.”

Weber, only 38, is still under contract — his rights are owned by the Utah Hockey Club that relocated from Arizona and used to be called the Coyotes — but was eligible because injuries ended his playing career in 2021 after helping Montreal reach the final. A two-time Olympic gold medal winner for Canada in 2010 and ‘14, he said he screened the hall’s call a couple of times not recognizing the number or expecting the news.

“My career obviously it was a great career,” said Weber, who played 11 of his 16 NHL seasons with Nashville and served as captain there from 2010-16. “I wish it could’ve gone longer and something that the body kind of tells you it’s time and unfortunately it was a tough time because mentally I still felt like I could compete and contribute but physically I just had nothing left to give.”

Poile, who drafted and then later traded Weber, has the most victories of any general manager in league history from his stints running the Washington Capitals and the Predators. He follows his late father, fellow exec Bud Poile, into the hall.

“I wish I could have a little conversation with him today,” he said.

Campbell, who spent more than a decade on the selection committee, has been working high up in the NHL office for more than 20 years since a stint coaching the New York Rangers. He said it was “kind of shocking” to get the call.

Darwitz and Wendell-Pohl were teammates at the University of Minnesota and on the U.S. national team, reaching the Olympic final in Salt Lake City in 2002 and leaving with silver medals. Wendell-Pohl got emotional when she found out they'd also be going into the hall together, especially as another sign of the growth and appreciation of women's hockey.

“It’s crazy,” she said. “To think of how far the game has come in such a short amount of time but yet feels so long ago when you think of where it was back when we kind of started playing on boys (teams) and the opportunities now that girls have to play.”

AP NHL: https://apnews.com/hub/nhl

FILE - Olympic medalist Krissy Wendell speaks with members of the media before being inducted into the U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame, Thursday, Dec. 12, 2019, in Washington. Wendell is part of the Hall of Fame class of 2024. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

FILE - Olympic medalist Krissy Wendell speaks with members of the media before being inducted into the U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame, Thursday, Dec. 12, 2019, in Washington. Wendell is part of the Hall of Fame class of 2024. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

FILE - Russian forward Pavel Datsyuk is in action during the exhibition ice hockey game between Russia and Belarus in Moscow, Russia, Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018. Datsyuk is part of the Hall of Fame class of 2024. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko, File)

FILE - Russian forward Pavel Datsyuk is in action during the exhibition ice hockey game between Russia and Belarus in Moscow, Russia, Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018. Datsyuk is part of the Hall of Fame class of 2024. (AP Photo/Alexander Zemlianichenko, File)

FILE - Montreal Canadiens' Shea Weber (6) celebrates his goal during the first period in Game 6 of an NHL hockey Stanley Cup semifinal playoff series against the Vegas Golden Knights Thursday, June 24, 2021 in Montreal. Weber is park of the Hall of Fame class of 2024. (Paul Chiasson/The Canadian Press via AP, File)

FILE - Montreal Canadiens' Shea Weber (6) celebrates his goal during the first period in Game 6 of an NHL hockey Stanley Cup semifinal playoff series against the Vegas Golden Knights Thursday, June 24, 2021 in Montreal. Weber is park of the Hall of Fame class of 2024. (Paul Chiasson/The Canadian Press via AP, File)

FILE - Natalie Darwitz of the USA women's ice hockey is seen during a press conference in Vancouver, British Columbia, Thursday, Feb. 11, 2010. Darwitz is part of the Hall of Fame class of 2024. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)

FILE - Natalie Darwitz of the USA women's ice hockey is seen during a press conference in Vancouver, British Columbia, Thursday, Feb. 11, 2010. Darwitz is part of the Hall of Fame class of 2024. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)

FILE - Former Chicago Blackhawks player Jeremy Roenick acknowledges the crowd after being honored before an NHL hockey game between the Vancouver Canucks and the Blackhawks, Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017, in Chicago. Roenick has been elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame after being eligible for more than a decade. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

FILE - Former Chicago Blackhawks player Jeremy Roenick acknowledges the crowd after being honored before an NHL hockey game between the Vancouver Canucks and the Blackhawks, Sunday, Jan. 22, 2017, in Chicago. Roenick has been elected to the Hockey Hall of Fame after being eligible for more than a decade. (AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh)

Next Article

Second phase of NRA civil trial over nonprofit’s spending begins in NYC

2024-07-15 22:07 Last Updated At:22:10

NEW YORK (AP) — The second phase of the civil trial against the National Rifle Association and its top executives began Monday in Manhattan, with New York Attorney General Letitia James seeking an independent monitor to oversee the powerful gun rights group.

The Democrat also is seeking to ban Wayne LaPierre, the organization’s former CEO, from serving in leadership positions for or collecting funds on behalf of charitable organizations conducting business in New York.

Judge Joel Cohen also will decide whether ex-general counsel John Frazer should be barred from charitable organizations in the state.

During the first phase of trial earlier this year, a jury in February found LaPierre misspent millions of dollars of NRA money in order to fund an extravagant lifestyle that included exotic getaways and trips on private planes and superyachts.

Jurors also found the NRA failed to properly manage its assets, omitted or misrepresented information in its tax filings and violated whistleblower protections under New York law.

The second phase of proceedings in Manhattan state court is a bench trial, meaning there is no jury and the judge will hand down the verdict.

The NRA, through its lawyer, called the request for a court-appointed monitor to oversee administration of the organization's charitable assets "unwarranted.”

William Brewer, a lawyer for the NRA, said Friday that the organization was the victim in the case and has since taken a “course correction” to make sure it is fully complaint with the state's nonprofit laws.

“The focal point for ‘phase two’ is the NYAG’s burden to show that any violation of any law is ‘continuing’ and persistent at the NRA," he said in an email. “This is a burden the NYAG cannot meet.”

Spokespersons for James declined to comment ahead of Monday's proceedings, as did a lawyer for LaPierre, who said his client isn't required to appear in person but would attend Monday. An email also was sent to Frazer’s lawyer.

The bench trial is expected to last about two weeks, with both sides launching into witness testimony Monday, according to James' office. Charles Cotton, a former NRA president, is expected to take the stand first.

Bob Barr, the organization's president and a former congressman, and Douglas Hamlin, the NRA's CEO, are among the current employees and board members also listed as potential witnesses, according to James' office.

The trial cast a spotlight on the leadership, organizational culture and finances of the lobbying group, which was founded more than 150 years ago in New York City to promote rifle skills and grew into a political juggernaut that influenced federal law and presidential elections.

The jury ordered LaPierre to repay almost $4.4 million to the organization he led for three decades, while the NRA’s retired finance chief, Wilson “Woody” Phillips, was ordered to pay back $2 million.

Last week, James’ office announced details of a settlement it reached with Phillips.

Under the agreement, he agreed to be banned for 10 years from serving as a fiduciary of a not-for-profit organization in New York. He also agreed to attend training before returning to any such position.

The deal means Phillips, now retired, doesn’t have to take part in the proceeding that started Monday, but he is still on the hook for $2 million in damages from the initial verdict.

Follow Philip Marcelo at twitter.com/philmarcelo.

FILE - Wayne LaPierre arrives at court, Jan. 24, 2024, in New York. The second phase of the civil trial against the National Rifle Association and its top executives opens Monday, July 15, in Manhattan, with New York Attorney General Letitia James seeking an independent monitor to oversee the powerful gun rights group. (AP Photo/Yuki Iwamura, File)

FILE - Wayne LaPierre arrives at court, Jan. 24, 2024, in New York. The second phase of the civil trial against the National Rifle Association and its top executives opens Monday, July 15, in Manhattan, with New York Attorney General Letitia James seeking an independent monitor to oversee the powerful gun rights group. (AP Photo/Yuki Iwamura, File)

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